Special Issue "Dendritic Cell Vaccine"

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A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Brian J. Czerniecki (Website)

Department of Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3 Perelman Center 3400 Civic Center Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
Interests: dendritic cells, toll like receptors, tumor immunology, innate immunity, T cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the FDA approval of Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer dendritic cell vaccines have moved into the forefront of cancer vaccines. There are many controversies surrounding the use of dendritic cell vaccines for therapy such as the phenotype, cytokine and chemokine production, sites and modes of delivery, and best way to load and target antigens to these cells. There continue to be many clinical trials using various types of activated dendritic cells for the treatment and prevention of numerous diseases especially cancer and some infectious diseases. We would like in this special issue on dendritic cell vaccines to point out some of the specific uses of dendritic cells and opportunities to improve dendritic cell vaccines in combinations with other therapies, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, chemokines and cytokines to alter the tumor microenvironment, antibodies, and reagents that are in trial that release “brakes” from the immune response. We would also use this forum to discuss the role of dendritic cell vaccines in secondary prevention of cancer: targeting stem cells, circulating tumor cells, dormant tumor cells, and senescent tumor cells.  Lastly factors that affect the accumulation of subtypes of dendritic cells in the tumor environment and factors that can change dendritic cells in the tumor environment would be welcome discussions. The book will include original research, review articles, commentaries and editorials discussing the use of dendritic cell vaccines in therapy.

Dr. Brian J. Czerniecki
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • dendritic cells
  • tumor immunology
  • tumor microenvironment
  • chemokines
  • cytokines
  • immature myeloid cells
  • lymphocytes
  • toll like receptors
  • pathogens

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Whole Tumor Antigen Vaccines: Where Are We?
Vaccines 2015, 3(2), 344-372; doi:10.3390/vaccines3020344
Received: 8 January 2015 / Revised: 13 April 2015 / Accepted: 16 April 2015 / Published: 23 April 2015
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (444 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With its vast amount of uncharacterized and characterized T cell epitopes available for activating CD4+ T helper and CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes simultaneously, whole tumor antigen represents an attractive alternative source of antigens as compared to tumor-derived peptides and full-length recombinant [...] Read more.
With its vast amount of uncharacterized and characterized T cell epitopes available for activating CD4+ T helper and CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes simultaneously, whole tumor antigen represents an attractive alternative source of antigens as compared to tumor-derived peptides and full-length recombinant tumor proteins for dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy. Unlike defined tumor-derived peptides and proteins, whole tumor lysate therapy is applicable to all patients regardless of their HLA type. DCs are essentially the master regulators of immune response, and are the most potent antigen-presenting cell population for priming and activating naïve T cells to target tumors. Because of these unique properties, numerous DC-based immunotherapies have been initiated in the clinics. In this review, we describe the different types of whole tumor antigens that we could use to pulse DCs ex vivo and in vivo. We also discuss the different routes of delivering whole tumor antigens to DCs in vivo and activating them with toll-like receptor agonists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dendritic Cell Vaccine)
Open AccessReview Dendritic Cell-Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell Differentiation for Cancer Therapy
Vaccines 2013, 1(4), 527-549; doi:10.3390/vaccines1040527
Received: 7 August 2013 / Revised: 18 October 2013 / Accepted: 7 November 2013 / Published: 21 November 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (695 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The success of cellular immunotherapies against cancer requires the generation of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. The type of T-cell response generated (e.g., Th1 or Th2) will determine the efficacy of the therapy, and it is generally assumed that a [...] Read more.
The success of cellular immunotherapies against cancer requires the generation of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. The type of T-cell response generated (e.g., Th1 or Th2) will determine the efficacy of the therapy, and it is generally assumed that a type-1 response is needed for optimal cancer treatment. IL-17 producing T-cells (Th17/Tc17) play an important role in autoimmune diseases, but their function in cancer is more controversial. While some studies have shown a pro-cancerous role for IL-17, other studies have shown an anti-tumor function. The induction of polarized T-cell responses can be regulated by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are key regulators of the immune system with the ability to affect both innate and adaptive immune responses. These properties have led many researchers to study the use of ex vivo manipulated DCs for the treatment of various diseases, such as cancer and autoimmune diseases. While Th1/Tc1 cells are traditionally used for their potent anti-tumor responses, mounting evidence suggests Th17/Tc17 cells should be utilized by themselves or for the induction of optimal Th1 responses. It is therefore important to understand the factors involved in the induction of both type-1 and type-17 T-cell responses by DCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dendritic Cell Vaccine)
Open AccessReview Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants
Vaccines 2013, 1(4), 444-462; doi:10.3390/vaccines1040444
Received: 22 July 2013 / Revised: 31 August 2013 / Accepted: 26 September 2013 / Published: 16 October 2013
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (1109 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the [...] Read more.
We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dendritic Cell Vaccine)

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