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Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 2017 Venoms to Drugs Conference"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Venoms".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Bryan Grieg Fry

Venom Evolution Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, 4072, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: venom molecular evolution; phylogenetics and structure-function relationships; toxins

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 2017 Venoms to Drugs meeting will be held at the Peppers Noosa Resort, Queensland, 9–14 October, 2017. The conference will focus on venom from cone snails, scorpions, spiders, snakes, and other species continue to provide an immense reservoir of potent bioactive peptides that target specific enzymes, ion channels, and receptors. As such, they represent major sources of lead compounds for both the development of pharmacological tools and novel drugs. This Special Issue aims to bring together active scholars and researchers to present their current scholarly work in venoms to drugs.

For additional links to the conference that you may find useful, please visit the following link: http://venomstodrugs.com/welcome-venoms-drugs

Prof. Dr. Bryan Grieg Fry
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessFeature PaperEditor’s ChoiceReview Sea Anemones: Quiet Achievers in the Field of Peptide Toxins
Received: 18 December 2017 / Revised: 4 January 2018 / Accepted: 4 January 2018 / Published: 8 January 2018
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (2935 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sea anemones have been understudied as a source of peptide and protein toxins, with relatively few examined as a source of new pharmacological tools or therapeutic leads. This is surprising given the success of some anemone peptides that have been tested, such as
[...] Read more.
Sea anemones have been understudied as a source of peptide and protein toxins, with relatively few examined as a source of new pharmacological tools or therapeutic leads. This is surprising given the success of some anemone peptides that have been tested, such as the potassium channel blocker from Stichodactyla helianthus known as ShK. An analogue of this peptide, ShK-186, which is now known as dalazatide, has successfully completed Phase 1 clinical trials and is about to enter Phase 2 trials for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. One of the impediments to the exploitation of sea anemone toxins in the pharmaceutical industry has been the difficulty associated with their high-throughput discovery and isolation. Recent developments in multiple ‘omic’ technologies, including genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, coupled with advanced bioinformatics, have opened the way for large-scale discovery of novel sea anemone toxins from a range of species. Many of these toxins will be useful pharmacological tools and some will hopefully prove to be valuable therapeutic leads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 2017 Venoms to Drugs Conference)
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