Special Issue "Neurotoxins of Biological Origin"

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A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2010)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Anthony T. Tu
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO 80523, USA
E-Mail: atu@lamar.colostate.edu
Phone: +1 970 491 1591
Fax: +1 970 491 6313
Interests: snake venoms; sea snake neurotoxins; Raman spectroscopy; structure-function relations of toxins; chemical weapons defense; NBCR anti-terrorism

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hideyuki Nakagawa
Department of Environmental Symbiosis, Institute of Scio-Arts and Sciences, The Universityof Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8502, Japan
E-Mail: sea-hide@ias.tokushima-u.ac.jp
Phone: +81 88-656-7259
Fax: +81 88-656-7259
Interests: marine toxins and venoms; lectin; motogenic activity; cytotoxic activity; diferentiation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The word “neurotoxins” attracts the interest if scientists and laymen alike. Neutoroxins can be of many different types with diverse origins, including both synthetic and naturally derived toxins. DDT, organophosphate insecticides, and nerve gases such as sarin, tabun, and VX are all neurotoxic, but the mechanisms of action can be different. Likewise, biological neurotoxins are also very complex and each toxin differs in binding site, source, and mechanism of toxic action. They may act on the axon, presynaptic site, or the postsynaptic site of the acetylcholine receptor. Some toxins even affect the axon’s sodium channel with different binding sites. Tetradotoxin (Fugu toxin) blocks the entrance of the sodium gate, while scorpion toxin binds to the interior portion of the sodium channel. Tetanus toxin enters the peripheral nervous system from the neuromuscular junction, travels through the inside of the axon, and stops at the place where the peripheral and central nerves connect. Because each toxin differs in action and binding site, this specificity can be used to study individual sites of the nervous system. For this reason, neurotoxins are considered good tools for the understanding of this complex system. In this special review, I asked experts of biological neurotoxins to contribute chapters to increase the understanding of different aspects of neurotoxins.

Prof. Dr. Anthony T. Tu
Prof. Dr. Hideyuki Nakagawa
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • natural poisons
  • neurotoxins of natural origin
  • neurotoxins of biological origin
  • botulinum toxin
  • phospholipase A2 snake neurotoxin
  • spider neurotoxin

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Displaying article 1-8
p. 43-62
by , , , , ,  and
Toxins 2011, 3(1), 43-62; doi:10.3390/toxins3010043
Received: 26 November 2010; in revised form: 30 December 2010 / Accepted: 4 January 2011 / Published: 7 January 2011
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxins of Biological Origin)
p. 17-42
by , ,  and
Toxins 2011, 3(1), 17-42; doi:10.3390/toxins3010017
Received: 14 October 2010; in revised form: 23 December 2010 / Accepted: 30 December 2010 / Published: 4 January 2011
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (483 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxins of Biological Origin)
p. 2663-2679
by , ,  and
Toxins 2010, 2(11), 2663-2679; doi:10.3390/toxins2112663
Received: 29 September 2010; in revised form: 28 October 2010 / Accepted: 1 November 2010 / Published: 3 November 2010
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (609 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxins of Biological Origin)
abstract graphic
p. 683-737
by  and
Toxins 2010, 2(4), 683-737; doi:10.3390/toxins2040683
Received: 21 February 2010; in revised form: 18 March 2010 / Accepted: 7 April 2010 / Published: 15 April 2010
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (997 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxins of Biological Origin)
p. 24-53
by  and
Toxins 2010, 2(1), 24-53; doi:10.3390/toxins2010024
Received: 1 December 2009; in revised form: 17 December 2009 / Accepted: 22 December 2009 / Published: 7 January 2010
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (1534 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-textCorrection | Supplementary Files
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxins of Biological Origin)
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p. 1-9
by ,  and
Toxins 2010, 2(1), 1-9; doi:10.3390/toxins2010001
Received: 2 December 2009; in revised form: 23 December 2009 / Accepted: 23 December 2009 / Published: 24 December 2009
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxins of Biological Origin)
p. 162-172
by , , ,  and
Toxins 2009, 1(2), 162-172; doi:10.3390/toxins1020162
Received: 28 October 2009; in revised form: 2 December 2009 / Accepted: 7 December 2009 / Published: 8 December 2009
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxins of Biological Origin)
p. 151-161
by , , ,  and
Toxins 2009, 1(2), 151-161; doi:10.3390/toxins1020151
Received: 28 October 2009; in revised form: 19 November 2009 / Accepted: 23 November 2009 / Published: 3 December 2009
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotoxins of Biological Origin)
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Last update: 5 March 2014

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