E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Effects of Mycotoxins on the Intestine"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Mycotoxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Isabelle P. Oswald

INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, 180 chemin de tournefeuille F-31027 Toulouse, France
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Dr. Philippe Pinton

Toxalim (Research Centre in Food Toxicology), Université de Toulouse, INRA, ENVT, INP-Purpan, UPS, 180 Chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse, Cedex, France
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Dr. Imourana Alassane-Kpembi

Toxalim (Research Centre in Food Toxicology), Université de Toulouse, INRA, ENVT, INP-Purpan, UPS, 180 Chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse, Cedex, France
E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The intestine is the first target when ingesting mycotoxin-contaminated food or feed. The focus of this Special Issue of Toxins is to gather the most recent advances related to the effects of mycotoxins on the intestine. Even though the mucosa is a major functional element of the intestinal integrity, increasing evidence suggests that other constituents, such as mucus and microbiota are involved. This Special Issue will, thus, not only take into consideration the effect of mycotoxins on the intestinal tissue, but will also address the most recent advances related to effect of these contaminants on mucus and microbiota. Papers dealing with animal models, intestinal explants, as well as cellular systems, are welcome. In this context, the omics data are encouraged. Both research papers and review articles proposing novelties or overviews, respectively, are welcome.

Dr. Isabelle P. Oswald
Dr. Philippe Pinton
Dr Imourana Alassane-Kpembi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mycotoxin

  • intestine

  • cells

  • mucus

  • microbiota

  • human

  • animals

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Effects of Adding Clostridium sp. WJ06 on Intestinal Morphology and Microbial Diversity of Growing Pigs Fed with Natural Deoxynivalenol Contaminated Wheat
Toxins 2017, 9(12), 383; doi:10.3390/toxins9120383
Received: 3 October 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 27 November 2017
PDF Full-text (5187 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Deoxynivalenol (DON) is commonly detected in cereals, and is a threat to human and animal health. The effects of microbiological detoxification are now being widely studied. A total of 24 pigs (over four months) were randomly divided into three treatments. Treatment A was
[...] Read more.
Deoxynivalenol (DON) is commonly detected in cereals, and is a threat to human and animal health. The effects of microbiological detoxification are now being widely studied. A total of 24 pigs (over four months) were randomly divided into three treatments. Treatment A was fed with a basal diet as the control group. Treatment B was fed with naturally DON-contaminated wheat as a negative control group. Treatment C was fed with a contaminated diet that also had Clostridium sp. WJ06, which was used as a detoxicant. Growth performance, relative organ weight, intestinal morphology, and the intestinal flora of bacteria and fungi were examined. The results showed that after consuming a DON-contaminated diet, the growth performance of the pigs decreased significantly (p < 0.05), the relative organ weight of the liver and kidney increased significantly (p < 0.05), and the integrity of the intestinal barrier was also impaired, though the toxic effects of the contaminated diets on growing pigs were relieved after adding Clostridium sp. WJ06. The data from MiSeq sequencing of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) gene suggested that the abundance of intestinal flora was significantly different across the three treatments. In conclusion, the application of Clostridium sp. WJ06 can reduce the toxic effects of DON and adjust the intestinal microecosystem of growing pigs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Mycotoxins on the Intestine)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Response of Intestinal Bacterial Flora to the Long-term Feeding of Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in Mice
Toxins 2017, 9(10), 317; doi:10.3390/toxins9100317
Received: 9 August 2017 / Revised: 28 September 2017 / Accepted: 30 September 2017 / Published: 12 October 2017
PDF Full-text (2209 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In order to investigate the influence of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on intestinal bacterial flora, 24 Kunming mice (KM mice) were randomly placed into four groups, which were labeled as control, low-dose, medium-dose, and high-dose groups. They were fed intragastrically with 0.4 mL of
[...] Read more.
In order to investigate the influence of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on intestinal bacterial flora, 24 Kunming mice (KM mice) were randomly placed into four groups, which were labeled as control, low-dose, medium-dose, and high-dose groups. They were fed intragastrically with 0.4 mL of 0 mg/L, 2.5 mg/L, 4 mg/L, or 10 mg/L of AFB1 solutions, twice a day for 2 months. The hypervariable region V3 + V4 on 16S rDNA of intestinal bacterial flora was sequenced by the use of a high-flux sequencing system on a Miseq Illumina platform; then, the obtained sequences were analyzed. The results showed that, when compared with the control group, both genera and phyla of intestinal bacteria in the three treatment groups decreased. About one third of the total genera and one half of the total phyla remained in the high-dose group. The dominant flora were Lactobacillus and Bacteroides in all groups. There were significant differences in the relative abundance of intestinal bacterial flora among groups. Most bacteria decreased as a whole from the control to the high-dose groups, but several beneficial and pathogenic bacterial species increased significantly with increasing dose of AFB1. Thus, the conclusion was that intragastric feeding with 2.5~10 mg/mL AFB1 for 2 months could decrease the majority of intestinal bacterial flora and induce the proliferation of some intestinal bacteria flora. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Mycotoxins on the Intestine)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top