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Special Issue "Public Health Outreach to Prevention of Aquatic Toxin Exposure"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine and Freshwater Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Natalia Vilariño

Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Veterinaria Campus Universitario, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Prof. M Carmen Louzao

Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Veterinaria Campus Universitario, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Algae and cyanobacteria are phytoplankton present in all aquatic environments. Some of them produce natural toxins to which human beings and animals may be exposed to through air, food, drinking water, or recreational activities. However, people are unaware of the threat of toxin exposure, and the potential effects, on their health.

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), caused by the massive growth of toxic phytoplankton, have increased in frequency and severity, suggesting a worldwide environmental and public health risk. In addition, occasionally, HAB events require restrictions on fisheries and recreational and drinking water causing serious economic consequences.

This Special Issue deals with scientific knowledge of the interrelationships between aquatic toxins associated with harmful algal blooms events and adverse human health effects, in order to improve public understanding.

The scope is multidisciplinary, with articles from wide range of subjects encompassing basic research, in vivo animal experiments, epidemiologic studies, risk assessment, and even relevant social and environmental topics.

The Guest Editors encourage integrative approaches with applications in toxin monitoring, promotion of safe environments and implementation of outreach activities to control, prevent or reduce further toxin exposures and to ensure public health.

Prof. Natalia Vilariño
Prof. M Carmen Louzao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cyanobacteria

  • harmful algae

  • marine toxins

  • freshwater toxins

  • disease surveillance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Management of Ciguatoxin Risk in Eastern Australia
Toxins 2017, 9(11), 367; doi:10.3390/toxins9110367
Received: 19 October 2017 / Revised: 8 November 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 14 November 2017
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Abstract
Between 2014 and 2016, five cases of ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), involving twenty four individuals, were linked to Spanish Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson) caught in the coastal waters of the state of New South Wales (NSW) on the east coast of Australia.
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Between 2014 and 2016, five cases of ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), involving twenty four individuals, were linked to Spanish Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson) caught in the coastal waters of the state of New South Wales (NSW) on the east coast of Australia. Previously, documented cases of CFP in NSW were few, and primarily linked to fish imported from other regions. Since 2015, thirteen individuals were affected across four additional CFP cases in NSW, linked to fish imported from tropical locations. The apparent increase in CFP in NSW from locally sourced catch, combined with the risk of CFP from imported fish, has highlighted several considerations that should be incorporated into risk management strategies to minimize CFP exposure for seafood consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Health Outreach to Prevention of Aquatic Toxin Exposure)
Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle Prevalence, Variability and Bioconcentration of Saxitoxin-Group in Different Marine Species Present in the Food Chain
Toxins 2017, 9(6), 190; doi:10.3390/toxins9060190
Received: 17 May 2017 / Revised: 7 June 2017 / Accepted: 8 June 2017 / Published: 12 June 2017
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Abstract
The saxitoxin-group (STX-group) corresponds to toxic metabolites produced by cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates of the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium, and Pyrodinium. Over the last decade, it has been possible to extrapolate the areas contaminated with the STX-group worldwide, including Chile, a phenomenon that
[...] Read more.
The saxitoxin-group (STX-group) corresponds to toxic metabolites produced by cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates of the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium, and Pyrodinium. Over the last decade, it has been possible to extrapolate the areas contaminated with the STX-group worldwide, including Chile, a phenomenon that has affected ≈35% of the Southern Pacific coast territory, generating a high economic impact. The objective of this research was to study the toxicity of the STX-group in all aquatic organisms (bivalves, algae, echinoderms, crustaceans, tunicates, cephalopods, gastropods, and fish) present in areas with a variable presence of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Then, the toxic profiles of each species and dose of STX equivalents ingested by a 60 kg person from 400 g of shellfish were determined to establish the health risk assessment. The toxins with the highest prevalence detected were gonyautoxin-4/1 (GTX4/GTX1), gonyautoxin-3/2 (GTX3/GTX2), neosaxitoxin (neoSTX), decarbamoylsaxitoxin (dcSTX), and saxitoxin (STX), with average concentrations of 400, 2800, 280, 200, and 2000 µg kg−1 respectively, a species-specific variability, dependent on the evaluated tissue, which demonstrates the biotransformation of the analogues in the trophic transfer with a predominance of α-epimers in all toxic profiles. The identification in multiple vectors, as well as in unregulated species, suggests that a risk assessment and risk management update are required; also, chemical and specific analyses for the detection of all analogues associated with the STX-group need to be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Health Outreach to Prevention of Aquatic Toxin Exposure)
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