E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Causes, Consequences and Control of Cyanobacterial Blooms in a Changing World"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine and Freshwater Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2017

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Miquel Lürling

Aquatic Ecology & Water Quality Management Group, Department of Environmental Sciences, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: controlling cyanobacteria blooms; cyanobacteria ecology; cyanobacteria toxins; managing eutrophication; plankton interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cyanobacteria are common and in evolutionary context the oldest inhabitants of aquatic systems. Massive occurrences or cyanobacterial blooms, due to accumulation of buoyant cells and/or strong proliferation as a consequence of eutrophication, present a serious threat to the environment and health of wildlife, cattle and humans, because several cyanobacteria can produce very potent toxins that constitute one of the most high-risk categories of waterborne toxic substances.

There is broad consensus that the incidence and intensity of cyanobacterial blooms are on the rise worldwide. Eutrophication, climatic changes (precipitation, drought, heat waves), elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, higher salinity and direct and indirect temperature effects are all expected to further aggravate the frequency, intensity and spreading of cyanobacterial blooms. As these blooms are in direct conflict with the safe and aesthetically acceptable water needed in a modern society, extenuating nuisance is considered a key challenge to water quality managers now and in the upcoming decades. Global changes, however, confront water managers, decision makers and scientists with new unforeseen uncertainties. Insight in mechanisms that influence bloom development, composition and most importantly their toxicity is needed for changing world scenarios –what to expect?– and for the development of promising mitigation tools—how to control?

This Special Issue invites manuscripts on all aspects dealing with cyanobacterial blooms in a changing world: from warming, eutrophication, carbon dioxide, salinity, brownification effects on cyanobacteria and/or their toxins via biotic interactions such as competition, predation, parasitism, and so on, to techniques mitigating cyanobacterial biomass and controlling toxins. Contributions from areas of the planet underrepresented in the scientific literature are particularly welcome.

Prof. Dr. Miquel Lürling
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change

  • cyanotoxins

  • eutrophication

  • mitigation

  • warming

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Responses of Microcystis Colonies of Different Sizes to Hydrogen Peroxide Stress
Toxins 2017, 9(10), 306; doi:10.3390/toxins9100306
Received: 29 August 2017 / Revised: 18 September 2017 / Accepted: 23 September 2017 / Published: 27 September 2017
PDF Full-text (1361 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Microcystis blooms have become a ubiquitous phenomenon in freshwater ecosystems, and the size of Microcystis colonies varies widely throughout the year. In the present study, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was applied to test the effect of this algaecide on Microcystis
[...] Read more.
Microcystis blooms have become a ubiquitous phenomenon in freshwater ecosystems, and the size of Microcystis colonies varies widely throughout the year. In the present study, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was applied to test the effect of this algaecide on Microcystis colonies of different sizes and to evaluate the colonies' antioxidant strategy. The results showed that Microcystis populations collapsed under treatment with 5 mg/L H2O2 at colony sizes smaller than 25 μm. A dosage of 20 mg/L H2O2 was necessary to efficiently control Microcystis colonies larger than 25 μm. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems of different colonies exhibited various strategies to mitigate oxidative stress. In small colonies, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was readily stimulated and operated with catalase (CAT) activity to eliminate reactive oxygen species (ROS). In colonies larger than 25 μm, the antioxidant enzyme CAT and antioxidant substance glutathione (GSH) played major roles in mitigating oxidative stress at H2O2 concentrations below 20 mg/L. In addition, application of the algaecide led to the release of intracellular-microcystins (MCs), and oxidatively-driven MCs reached high concentrations when colony size was larger than 100 μm. Algaecide control measures should be implemented before the formation of large colonies to limit the algaecide dosage and MC release. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Benthic Archives Reveal Recurrence and Dominance of Toxigenic Cyanobacteria in a Eutrophic Lake over the Last 220 Years
Toxins 2017, 9(9), 271; doi:10.3390/toxins9090271
Received: 3 August 2017 / Revised: 25 August 2017 / Accepted: 1 September 2017 / Published: 4 September 2017
PDF Full-text (2274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Akinetes are resistant cells which have the ability to persist in sediment for several decades. We have investigated the temporal distribution of akinetes of two species, Dolichospermum macrosporum and Dolichospermum flos-aquae, in a sediment core sampled in Lake Aydat (France), which covers
[...] Read more.
Akinetes are resistant cells which have the ability to persist in sediment for several decades. We have investigated the temporal distribution of akinetes of two species, Dolichospermum macrosporum and Dolichospermum flos-aquae, in a sediment core sampled in Lake Aydat (France), which covers 220 years. The upper part, from 1907 to 2016, the number of akinetes fluctuated but stayed at high concentrations, especially for D. macrosporum in surface sediment (with the maximal value close to 6.105 akinetes g DW−1 of sediment), suggesting a recurrence of blooms of this species which was probably closely related to anthropic eutrophication since the 1960s. Before 1907, the abundance of akinetes of both species was very low, suggesting only a modest presence of these cyanobacteria. In addition, the percentage of intact akinetes was different for each species, suggesting different ecological processes in the water column. This percentage also decreased with depth, revealing a reduction in germination potential over time. In addition, biosynthetic genes of anatoxin-a (anaC) and microcystin (mcyA) were detected. First results show a high occurrence of mcyA all down the core. In contrast, anaC gene was mostly detected in the surface sediment (since the 1980s), revealing a potentially more recent occurrence of this cyanotoxin in Lake Aydat which may be associated with the recurrence of blooms of D. macrosporum and thus with anthropic activities. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top