Special Issue "Challenges for Marketers in Sustainable Production and Consumption"

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A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2015

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Panayiota Alevizou
Management School, University of Sheffield, Conduit Rd, Sheffield, S10 1FL, UK
Website: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/management/staff/alevizou
E-Mail: p.j.alevizou@sheffield.ac.uk
Phone: +44(0)1142223423
Fax: +44(0)1142223423
Interests: marketing sustainability; sustainable consumer behavior; sustainable production; eco labelling and certification

Guest Editor
Dr. Caroline J. Oates
Management School, University of Sheffield, Conduit Rd, Sheffield, S10 1FL, UK
Website: https://www.shef.ac.uk/management/staff/oates
E-Mail: c.j.oates@sheffield.ac.uk
Phone: +44(0)1142223448
Fax: +44(0)1142223348
Interests: marketing sustainability; sustainable consumption; children and sustainable consumption

Guest Editor
Prof. Seonaidh McDonald
Aberdeen Business School, Institute of Management, Governance and Society, Robert Gordon University, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen, Scotland, AB10 7QE
Website: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/dmstaff/mcdonald-seonaidh
E-Mail: s.mcdonald@rgu.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0)1224263896
Interests: sustainable consumption; green consumer behavior; qualitative research methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability cuts across all areas of production and consumption. This indicates a need to address sustainability holistically so as to understand the challenges we face today in attempting to decrease our environmental impact on society. Evidence suggests that there is increasing pressure from stakeholders about the social and environmental responsibilities of companies (for example, those responsibilities concerning how products are manufactured and marketed to consumers). Recent catastrophic events, such as the factory collapse in Bangladesh, have highlighted unacceptable and unethical practices in production, thus prompting, at the very least, a media backlash against the companies involved. Therefore, one of the many challenges for consumers choosing between different brands is to inform and possibly educate buyers about brands’ sustainable production practices, so as to convey potential advantages for sustainable brands over similar but less sustainable ones.

The interface between companies and consumers in promoting sustainable production and consumption is reflected in contact points, such as advertising, packaging, and labeling. Such points are key providers of information concerning how products are sourced, manufactured, and used.

However, consumers themselves are faced with a bewildering range of product choices and increasing information, which raises questions about the links between sustainability in production and consumption.

We invite papers that examine the relationship between how organizations attempt to produce and market sustainable products/services, and how these are understood and consumed by the target audience. Topics might include, but are not limited to, issues around transparency of information, consumer knowledge, regulation of environmental claims, packaging design, product labeling, eco labeling, and sustainable consumption.

Dr. Panayiota Alevizou
Dr. Caroline J. Oates
Prof. Seonaidh McDonald
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • marketing of sustainable products
  • sustainable production
  • sustainability marketing
  • consumer knowledge
  • eco labeling
  • regulation of environmental claims

Published Papers (2 papers)

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p. 8808-8826
by  and
Sustainability 2014, 6(12), 8808-8826; doi:10.3390/su6128808
Received: 11 September 2014 / Revised: 3 November 2014 / Accepted: 19 November 2014 / Published: 2 December 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges for Marketers in Sustainable Production and Consumption)
p. 7768-7786
by
Sustainability 2014, 6(11), 7768-7786; doi:10.3390/su6117768
Received: 12 September 2014 / Revised: 27 October 2014 / Accepted: 3 November 2014 / Published: 5 November 2014
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Communicating Sustainable Shoes to Mainstream Consumers: The Impact of Advertisement Design on Buying Intention
Authors:
Mirjam Visser 1,*, Valentin Gattol 2 and Rosan van der Helm 3
Affiliations:
1 Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Dept. of Design Engineering, Landbergstraat 15, 2628 CE Delft, the Netherlands; m.c.visser@tudelft.nl
2
Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Dept. of Product Innovation Management, Landbergstraat 15, 2628 CE Delft, the Netherlands; v.gattol@tudelft.nl; Austrian Institute of Technology, Dept. of Innovation Systems, Donau-City-Str. 1, 1220 Vienna, Austria
3
Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Dept. of Design Engineering, Landbergstraat 15, 2628 CE Delft, the Netherlands; rosanvanderhelm@gmail.com
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: m.c.visser@tudelft.nl;
Tel.: +49-151 425 46164; Fax: +1-111-111-112.
Abstract:
Traditionally marketing of sustainable products addresses green buyers, thus staying a niche market and missing out on the mainstream consumers and volume necessary to cover the potentially higher cost of more sustainable materials. However, how to effectively communicate more sustainable products to mainstream consumers and to increase their buying intention is still underexplored. Combining personal and environmental benefits, called double benefit theory, is promoted as an effective green marketing strategy but so far not supported by quantitative research as being effective to reach mainstream consumers. We studied the effect of advertisement elements (layout colour, benefit type, and heritage) on the products’ perceived sustainability, quality and fashion image, and buying intentions of young mainstream consumers. Two hundred young adults participated in a study that was based on a 2 (red vs. green layout) × 2 (personal vs. environmental benefit) × 2 (local vs. global heritage) between-subjects factorial design of a sustainable shoe advertisement. The impact of these independent variables on the perceived product image as well as on buying intention was analysed by means of three-way ANOVAs. In line with the double benefit theory, combining a personal benefit with a green layout led to the highest buying intention. Moreover, a mediation analysis revealed the positive effect of emphasizing a personal benefit on buying intention was mediated by fashion image but not by sustainability. Sustainability, however, did have a positive effect on buying intentions independent of benefit type.
Keywords:
marketing; sustainability; double filter; buying decision; linked benefit; willingness to pay; buying intention; brand image; product image

Last update: 22 December 2014

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