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Special Issue "Intelligent Environments and Planning for Urban Renewal"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Nicos Komninos

Urban and Regional Innovation Research (URENIO) Faculty of Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +30 2310 995581
Fax: +30 2310 995583
Interests: smart cities; intelligent cities; innovation systems; innovation strategy; urban and regional planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental, social, and economic sustainability of cities are widely accepted objectives of urban development and planning. Urban renewal, in particular, gives priority to objectives of economic revitalization, improvement of the physical space of cities, and a lower environmental footprint. Now, the wide spread of broadband networks, the web, smart devices, sensors, and other ICTs is generating a wave of innovations which radically change the way urban planning, renewal, and sustainability can be achieved in cities.

The digital and intelligent environments we create affect the design of new cities and greenfield urban developments, but mostly the renewal of existing cities. Software applications and embedded systems offer new opportunities for economic development, behavioral change in the use of urban infrastructure, near-zero energy districts, better quality of life, security and health, more transparent and participatory government. The city becomes a measurable system allowing optimization, as its digital components create streams of big data generated by sensors, social media, webpages, smartphones, GPS, intelligent mobility and tracking systems. On the other hand, urban planning and urban renewal lose their centralized character and open to bottom-up initiatives and people-driven solutions. This trend in particular, the user-driven innovation, has a pivotal impact as intelligent environments enable innovation-for-all and citizens can freely shape the digital life of cities.

Within the new landscape of intelligent environments for cities, this Special Issue of Sustainability focuses on planning for urban renewal, and how the digital and intelligent environments change strategic planning, urban renewal, and urban sustainability methods, solutions, and strategies. We welcome papers dealing with case studies, literature review, and empirical survey findings. Topics to be addressed may include, but are not limited to, the following :

  • Planning of digitally-led urban renewal
  • Urban renewal by large-scale user-involvement
  • User-driven co-design for urban renewal
  • Participatory design of smart city districts and hubs
  • Experimental development of smart near-zero energy districts
  • Experimental development of smart eco-districts
  • Urban sustainability within sensor-based environments
  • Adaptation of urban renewal rating systems to digital conditions of sustainability.

Prof. Dr. Nicos Komninos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Some Related Literature:

Anttiroiko, A.V. (2012). “Urban planning 2.0”. International Journal of E-Planning Research, 1(1). http://www.academia.edu/2161282/Urban_Planning_2.0
Green, J. (2011). Digital Urban Renewal. OVUM Consulting. http://www.cisco.com/web/strategy/docs/scc/Digital_Urban_Renewal.pdf
Kingston, R., Babicki, D., and Ravetz, J. (2005). “Urban regeneration in the intelligent city”. 9th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management. http://www.ppgis.manchester.ac.uk/downloads/kingston_paper_CUPUM_2005.pdf
Komninos, N. (2014). The Age of Intelligent Cities: Smart Environments and Innovation-for-all Strategies. London and New York. Routledge. http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138782198/
Marsh, J. et al. (2015). Citizen-Driven Innovation: A guidebook for city mayors and public administrators. World Bank and ENOLL. http://www.urenio.org/2015/06/20/citizen-driven-innovation-and-smart-cities/
Sidawi, B., Deakin, M. and Al Waer, H. (2013). "Development in the Gulf: sustainable, intelligent and smart". Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, 2(3). http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/SASBE-10-2013-0053

Keywords

  • intelligent cities
  • smart cities
  • intelligent environments
  • urban sensor networks
  • urban innovation ecosystems
  • user-driven innovation
  • urban sustainability
  • urban renewal
  • strategic planning
  • planning paradigm

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Identification and Prediction of Large Pedestrian Flow in Urban Areas Based on a Hybrid Detection Approach
Sustainability 2017, 9(1), 36; doi:10.3390/su9010036
Received: 8 November 2016 / Revised: 10 December 2016 / Accepted: 19 December 2016 / Published: 28 December 2016
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Abstract
Recently, population density has grown quickly with the increasing acceleration of urbanization. At the same time, overcrowded situations are more likely to occur in populous urban areas, increasing the risk of accidents. This paper proposes a synthetic approach to recognize and identify the
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Recently, population density has grown quickly with the increasing acceleration of urbanization. At the same time, overcrowded situations are more likely to occur in populous urban areas, increasing the risk of accidents. This paper proposes a synthetic approach to recognize and identify the large pedestrian flow. In particular, a hybrid pedestrian flow detection model was constructed by analyzing real data from major mobile phone operators in China, including information from smartphones and base stations (BS). With the hybrid model, the Log Distance Path Loss (LDPL) model was used to estimate the pedestrian density from raw network data, and retrieve information with the Gaussian Progress (GP) through supervised learning. Temporal-spatial prediction of the pedestrian data was carried out with Machine Learning (ML) approaches. Finally, a case study of a real Central Business District (CBD) scenario in Shanghai, China using records of millions of cell phone users was conducted. The results showed that the new approach significantly increases the utility and capacity of the mobile network. A more reasonable overcrowding detection and alert system can be developed to improve safety in subway lines and other hotspot landmark areas, such as the Bundle, People’s Square or Disneyland, where a large passenger flow generally exists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligent Environments and Planning for Urban Renewal)
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Open AccessArticle City-as-a-Platform: The Rise of Participatory Innovation Platforms in Finnish Cities
Sustainability 2016, 8(9), 922; doi:10.3390/su8090922
Received: 5 July 2016 / Revised: 29 August 2016 / Accepted: 5 September 2016 / Published: 10 September 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (753 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article discusses the idea of city as a platform. The analysis focuses on the forms and implications of citizen involvement in publicly-supported participatory innovation platforms that facilitate urban economic development in the welfare society context. The discussion opens with a review of
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This article discusses the idea of city as a platform. The analysis focuses on the forms and implications of citizen involvement in publicly-supported participatory innovation platforms that facilitate urban economic development in the welfare society context. The discussion opens with a review of the smart city discourse, which in the context of economic development policy translates into cities’ need to support innovativeness by creating smart environments. Participatory innovation platform is a prime example of such an environment. The empirical section discusses three cases, those of the Finnish cities of Helsinki, Tampere, and Oulu. The analysis shows that platformization in the first half of the 2010s became a strategic focal area supported by national and EU programs. Platforms are used to support both urban revitalization and economic development, of which the former is based on representative and the latter on instrumental modes of participation. Platforms are well integrated with city governments, even though they vary greatly in terms of organizational forms and scopes. Democratic culture, welfarism, and redistributive policy provide contextual support for platformization by strengthening social inclusion, taming the growth machine, and easing the tensions between pro-growth and anti-growth coalitions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligent Environments and Planning for Urban Renewal)
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Open AccessArticle Impact of the Smart City Industry on the Korean National Economy: Input-Output Analysis
Sustainability 2016, 8(7), 649; doi:10.3390/su8070649
Received: 10 May 2016 / Revised: 27 June 2016 / Accepted: 4 July 2016 / Published: 8 July 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1023 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The characteristics of the smart city industry and its effects on the national economy of Korea are investigated using input-output analysis. The definition and industrial classification of a smart city are established using the Delphi technique for experts in various fields, from information
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The characteristics of the smart city industry and its effects on the national economy of Korea are investigated using input-output analysis. The definition and industrial classification of a smart city are established using the Delphi technique for experts in various fields, from information and communication technologies (ICT) to governmental policies for urban matters. The results of the analysis, including the production, value added and employment induction effects, show that the smart city industry has intermediate characteristics between ICT and urban construction industries, indicating that acquisition of the competitive edge of both the ICT and construction industries is the key to the success of the smart city industry. The crucial industries related to the smart city industry are identified based on an analysis of the forward and backward linkage effects, the results of which suggest the importance of the relevant service industries. The economic effects on the national economy induced by the governmental program for smart city demonstration are estimated using input-output analysis results. Overall, the results of this study indicate that facilitation of the smart city industry plays a key role not only in the sustainable city, but also in the growth of the national economy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligent Environments and Planning for Urban Renewal)
Open AccessArticle Temporal Variations of Citizens’ Demands on Flood Damage Mitigation, Streamflow Quantity and Quality in the Korean Urban Watershed
Sustainability 2016, 8(4), 370; doi:10.3390/su8040370
Received: 16 February 2016 / Revised: 13 March 2016 / Accepted: 16 March 2016 / Published: 13 April 2016
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Abstract
Sustainable watershed management (SWM) can be achieved through recognition and reflection upon the values of citizens. Collaborative governance consisting of citizens is crucial for successful SWM. Collaborative governance definitely requires an active participatory decision-making process that reflects citizens’ preferences. Citizen preference also tends
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Sustainable watershed management (SWM) can be achieved through recognition and reflection upon the values of citizens. Collaborative governance consisting of citizens is crucial for successful SWM. Collaborative governance definitely requires an active participatory decision-making process that reflects citizens’ preferences. Citizen preference also tends to substantially change with life pattern and life quality. These shifts can be caused by slight variations in both social priorities and personal preferences for SWM. Therefore, collaborative water governance must be frequently renewed in response to citizens’ values through the participatory framework. The An’yang Stream in South Korea is generally regarded as a representative urban stream restoration case that has been successfully led by collaborative governance. By conducting individual surveys with citizens on-site, this study addresses how citizens’ preferences of the stream’s management have changed between 2005 and 2015. In addition, this study used three quantitative hydrologic vulnerability indices: potential flood damage (PFD), potential streamflow depletion (PSD), and potential water quality deterioration (PWQD). They can spatially quantify citizen preference using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), which can systematically derive citizens’ subjective relative-weighted preferences. In the end, this study identified critical differences in priorities in regard to vulnerable areas between in 2005 and in 2015. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligent Environments and Planning for Urban Renewal)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Reconsidering the Geddesian Concepts of Community and Space through the Paradigm of Smart Cities
Sustainability 2016, 8(10), 985; doi:10.3390/su8100985
Received: 21 July 2016 / Revised: 22 September 2016 / Accepted: 23 September 2016 / Published: 30 September 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The 100th anniversary of Geddes’ book “Cities in Evolution” has just passed, and the authors of this paper present a contribution towards understanding “how” Geddes might address the paradigm of the “smart city”. Geddesian concepts have greatly revolutionized the design and building of
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The 100th anniversary of Geddes’ book “Cities in Evolution” has just passed, and the authors of this paper present a contribution towards understanding “how” Geddes might address the paradigm of the “smart city”. Geddesian concepts have greatly revolutionized the design and building of modern cities around the world. As a botanist and a scientist, Geddes incorporated the concept of the appearance of gardens when designing towns. His success in pioneering the planning of his city of residence in Scotland inspired further involvement in designing towns and the renovation of old structures and buildings. His concepts regarding the planning and development of towns and cities have created a foundation of interest in research, professionalism, and educational development. This study analyses the concepts of space, communities, and smart cities, and repositions Geddesian ideas in contemporary learning strategies in relation to the wider political spectrum associated with the paradigm of smart cities. The authors explore the relevance of his thoughts and perspectives in the current design environment geared towards the creation of smart cities. The study also evaluates the challenges of developing smart cities in relation to Patrick Geddes’s ideas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligent Environments and Planning for Urban Renewal)

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