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Special Issue "Nuclear Waste Management and Sustainability of Nuclear Systems"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Michael I. Ojovan

Faculty of Engineering, Department of Materials, Imperial College London, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 747 828 9098
Interests: materials science applied to nuclear waste management and Earth investigation (nuclear waste processing; metallic, glass, glass composite, ceramics and cements, long term performance)
Guest Editor
Mr. Zoran Drace

European Union Project for Chernobyl, Ukraine (Director) and International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), IAEA (Former Head)
E-Mail
Phone: +43 664 391 8231
Interests: sustainability of nuclear energy systems; nuclear waste predisposal management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nuclear energy is clean, reliable, and competitive with its most important application in power generation, where it can gradually replace fossil fuels and avoid massive pollution of the environment. A useless byproduct, resulting from utilization of nuclear energy in both power generation and other useful applications, such as in medicine, industry, and research, is nuclear waste. To be sustainable in the long term, nuclear energy systems should avoid undue burdens on future generations caused by nuclear waste. This is achieved by reducing the generation of waste and by safe and effective management of radioactive legacy waste and of the waste unavoidable generated during utilization of nuclear energy.

This Special Issue aims to analyze the nuclear waste management activities pursuing to provide environmentally safe utilization of nuclear energy in a sustainable manner. It will focus on assessment of nuclear energy systems in regard of their long-term sustainability and adequate pre-disposal waste management activities aiming to provide environmental safe and sustainable development.

Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a rigorous peer review procedure with the aim of their rapid and wide dissemination.

Prof. Dr. Michael I. Ojovan
Mr. Zoran Drace
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Nuclear waste management for sustainable development
  • Nuclear waste from current and future uses of nuclear energy
  • Sustainability evaluation of nuclear energy systems
  • Methodology of sustainability assessment of nuclear energy systems
  • Pre-disposal activities to address sustainable development
  • Material aspects of sustainable development

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Comparison and Screening of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options in View of Sustainable Performance and Waste Management
Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1623; doi:10.3390/su9091623
Received: 30 August 2017 / Revised: 7 September 2017 / Accepted: 10 September 2017 / Published: 13 September 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5582 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Is it true that a nuclear technology approach to generate electric energy offers a clean, safe, reliable and affordable, i.e., sustainable option? In principle yes, however a technology impact on the environment strongly depends on the actual implementation bearing residual risks due to
[...] Read more.
Is it true that a nuclear technology approach to generate electric energy offers a clean, safe, reliable and affordable, i.e., sustainable option? In principle yes, however a technology impact on the environment strongly depends on the actual implementation bearing residual risks due to technical failures, human factors, or natural catastrophes. A full response is thus difficult and can be given first when the wicked multi-disciplinary issues get well formulated and “resolved”. These problems are lying at the interface between: the necessary R&D effort, the industrial deployment and the technology impact in view of the environmental sustainability including the management of produced hazardous waste. As such, this problem is clearly of multi-dimensional nature. This enormous complexity indicates that just a description of the problem might cause a dilemma. The paper proposes a novel holistic approach applying Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis to assess the potential of nuclear energy systems with respect to a sustainable performance. It shows how to establish a multi-level criteria structure tree and examines the trading-off techniques for scoring and ranking of options. The presented framework allows multi-criteria and multi-group treatment. The methodology can be applied to support any pre-decisional process launched in a country to find the best nuclear and/or non-nuclear option according to national preferences and priorities. The approach addresses major aspects of the environmental footprint of nuclear energy systems. As a case study, advanced nuclear fuel cycles are analyzed, which were previously investigated by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA/OECD) expert group WASTEMAN. Sustainability facets of waste management, resource utilization and economics are in focus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuclear Waste Management and Sustainability of Nuclear Systems)
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Open AccessArticle Nuclear Power and Resource Efficiency—A Proposal for a Revised Primary Energy Factor
Sustainability 2017, 9(6), 1063; doi:10.3390/su9061063
Received: 13 March 2017 / Revised: 14 June 2017 / Accepted: 14 June 2017 / Published: 20 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (528 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Measuring resource efficiency can be achieved using different methods, of which primary energy demand is commonly used. The primary energy factor (PEF) is a figure describing how much energy from primary resources is being used per unit of energy delivered. The PEF for
[...] Read more.
Measuring resource efficiency can be achieved using different methods, of which primary energy demand is commonly used. The primary energy factor (PEF) is a figure describing how much energy from primary resources is being used per unit of energy delivered. The PEF for nuclear power is typically 3, which refers to thermal energy released from fission in relation to electricity generated. Fuel losses are not accounted for. However; nuclear waste represents an energy loss, as current plans for nuclear waste management mostly include final disposal. Based on a literature review and mathematical calculations of the power-to-fuel ratio for nuclear power, PEF values for the open nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) option of nuclear power and different power mixes are calculated. These calculations indicate that a more correct PEF for nuclear power would be 60 (range 32–88); for electricity in Sweden (41% nuclear power) PEF would change from 1.8 to 25.5, and the average PEF for electricity in the European Union (EU) would change from 2.5 to 18. The results illustrate the poor resource efficiency of nuclear power, which paves the way for the fourth generation of nuclear power and illustrates the policy implication of using PEFs which are inconsistent with current waste management plans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuclear Waste Management and Sustainability of Nuclear Systems)
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