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Special Issue "Modern Statistical Techniques and Sustainability Studies: Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on PLS and Related Methods (PLS'17)"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ivan K. W. Lai

Caritas Institute of Higher Education, Hong Kong 999077, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: tourism and consumption; information technology and management; carbon reduction and transportation
Guest Editor
Dr. Yide Liu

Macau University of Science and Technology, Macau 999078, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainable cities; competitive and sustainable strategy; information systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

By comparing with first-generation statistical techniques (e.g., linear regression, ANOVA, MANOVA), second-generation techniques can provide a more rigorous analysis by assessing the structural model and the measurement model at the same time. With the proliferation of second-generation statistical techniques in nutrition, technology, energy, economics, sustainable cities, management, consumption and other sustainability disciplines, it is time to have a a dearth of understanding regarding the role that second-generation statistical techniques can play toward achiving social and environmental sustainability studies.

This Special Issue will address wide-ranging topics on modern statistical techniques and sustainability studies, espeically the original methodological contributions in modern statistical techniques with application in areas and disciplines related to management, social sciences, chemometrics, sensory analysis, industry, tourism and life sciences including genomics. It is hoped that the broad scope of this Special Issue will encourage submissions from across several disciplines.

Dr. Ivan K. W. Lai
Dr. Yide Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Environmental sustainability
  • Social sustainability
  • Applied statistics
  • Sustainable development index and index research
  • Partial least squares
  • Structural equation modeling
  • Tourism and consumption
  • Information technology and management
  • Sensory analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Voice Behavior, Supervisor Attribution and Employee Performance Appraisal
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1829; doi:10.3390/su9101829
Received: 21 August 2017 / Revised: 8 October 2017 / Accepted: 9 October 2017 / Published: 12 October 2017
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Abstract
Employees contribute to the sustainability of organizations in many ways, yet the specific impact of employee voice on employee performance appraisal, as an element of organization sustainability, is not clear. Based on the attribution theory, we present a model to investigate the relationship
[...] Read more.
Employees contribute to the sustainability of organizations in many ways, yet the specific impact of employee voice on employee performance appraisal, as an element of organization sustainability, is not clear. Based on the attribution theory, we present a model to investigate the relationship between employee voice and employee performance appraisal. Using the PLS (Partial Least Squares) method, we test our model’s hypotheses with 273 dyads of supervisor-employee questionnaires administered on a branch of a state-owned enterprise in China. The results show that promotive voice is positively attributed to prosocial motives and constructive motives, while prohibitive voice is not significantly attributed to prosocial motives and constructive motives. The attribution of prosocial motives and constructive motives has a significant and positive effect on employees’ performance appraisal. Moreover, the attribution of prosocial motives and constructive motives fully mediates the relationship between promotive voice and performance appraisal, but has no mediating effects on the relationship between prohibitive voice and performance appraisal. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Do National Cultural Traits Affect Comparative Advantage in Cultural Goods?
Sustainability 2017, 9(7), 1153; doi:10.3390/su9071153
Received: 30 May 2017 / Revised: 23 June 2017 / Accepted: 26 June 2017 / Published: 1 July 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (417 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Trade in cultural goods is making an increasingly significant contribution to international trade, but its flows are very uneven across regions, which has raised concerns over cultural homogenization. This paper considers various aspects of national culture as possible explanations for comparative advantage in
[...] Read more.
Trade in cultural goods is making an increasingly significant contribution to international trade, but its flows are very uneven across regions, which has raised concerns over cultural homogenization. This paper considers various aspects of national culture as possible explanations for comparative advantage in cultural goods. Using data from 98 countries over the period 2004 to 2014, and employing Hofstede’s multidimensional approach to culture, we test the relationship between the dimensions of national culture and comparative advantage in cultural goods. We find that the cultural dimensions of individualism, masculinity, long-term orientation, and indulgence are positively associated, whereas the cultural dimensions of power distance and uncertainty avoidance are negatively associated with comparative advantage in cultural goods. Full article
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