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Special Issue "Toward Sustainability: Supply Chain Collaboration and Governance"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chwen Sheu

College of Business, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainability; supply chain governance; supply chain relationship; supply chain analytics; innovation
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Fei Ye

School of Business Administration, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainability; supply chain coordination; supply chain optimization; service operations
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yuyin Yi

School of Management, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: green supply chain; sustainability; closed-loop supply chain with product remanufacturing; low-carbon supply chain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In practice, manufacturing sustainability is achieved through communication, coordination, and cooperation from the entire supply chain. Different terms have been used to describe the efforts of an extended supply chain, such as sustainable supply chain or green supply chain. Firms have gradually recognized the need for linking boundary-spanning activities (product stewardship, reverse logistics, collaborative planning) with supply chain partners, to address economic, environmental and social issues. The scholarly and managerial literature has offered constructive suggestions for developing and implementing supply chain management to improve operational and financial performance. What is less clear and requires more research is: What can firms do, and how, to improve environmental and social performance within their supply chains?

This Special Issue aims at contributing to the sustainability literature by answering this research question. In particular, we are interested in manuscripts that focus on the development, management, and governance of inter-organizational collaborative programs aimed at achieving the goals of sustainability. Covered topics include, but are not limited to, the effectiveness of various collaborative activities (e.g., supplier investment/training, co-process/product innovations, performance incentives), the effectiveness of control/governance mechanisms (contract, relationship) adopted to guide and monitor sustainable supply chain collaboration, the cross-country/culture comparison of sustainable supply chain collaboration and governance, the effects of organizational culture on sustainability collaboration and governance, the contingency factors of implementing sustainability collaboration and governance, etc.

Manuscripts that present novel discussion on recent developments, applications, and methodologies in the relevant areas are invited. Preference will be given to those studies that investigate multiple-tier, extending beyond dyadic, supply chain  and global sustainability collaboration and governance.

Prof. Dr. Chwen Sheu
Prof. Dr. Fei Ye
Prof. Dr. Yuyin Yi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • Corporate social responsibility
  • Supply chain governance
  • Supply chain collaboration
  • Supplier management
  • Green supply chain
  • Sustainable supply chain
  • Triple bottom line

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Low-Carbon Supply Chain Management Considering Free Emission Allowance and Abatement Cost Sharing
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2110; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072110 (registering DOI)
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 12 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 21 June 2018
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Abstract
As people concern themselves with environmental problems, the right to emit carbon dioxide becomes a new resource with business value that is incorporated in firms’ budgets. This paper studies the optimal emission abatement decision for firms in a supply chain, considering emission costs.
[...] Read more.
As people concern themselves with environmental problems, the right to emit carbon dioxide becomes a new resource with business value that is incorporated in firms’ budgets. This paper studies the optimal emission abatement decision for firms in a supply chain, considering emission costs. Four Stackelberg models are established that differ in free emission allowance allocation schemes and emission abatement cost-sharing schemes. On comparing optimal solutions in the models, the results show that regardless of which free emission allowance allocation scheme or emission abatement cost-sharing scheme is adopted, upstream firms tend to set a higher emission reduction rate. If supply chain firms aim for a higher emission reduction rate, they should advocate that upstream and downstream firms establish emission abatement cost-sharing contracts. The upstream firms should undertake larger emission reduction costs, and use free emission allowance allocation schemes based on emission intensity; the optimal emission reduction rate is related to carbon price, and the relationship may not be monotonous, affected by the difficulty of reducing emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward Sustainability: Supply Chain Collaboration and Governance)
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Open AccessArticle The Influence of Collaboration Initiatives on the Sustainability of the Cashew Supply Chain
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 2075; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10062075
Received: 28 April 2018 / Revised: 12 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 19 June 2018
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Abstract
Collaboration is emerging as a requirement for strengthening relationships among supply chain members and sustainability is rising as a real-world solution for different environmental issues. There are numerous studies that approach both perspectives, but there are still many questions about their relationship, mostly
[...] Read more.
Collaboration is emerging as a requirement for strengthening relationships among supply chain members and sustainability is rising as a real-world solution for different environmental issues. There are numerous studies that approach both perspectives, but there are still many questions about their relationship, mostly in the agri-food industry. Hence, this paper aims to address the influence of collaboration initiatives on the sustainability indicators of the cashew supply chain (SC). To reach this objective, a case study was performed among farmers belonging to the Cooperative of Cashews in the Piauí state (COCAJUPI), a local cooperative in Northern Brazil. Attending to the results, it is possible to state that the collaboration initiatives that have higher levels of implementation among research companies are the “trust among supply chain members” and the “sharing of standards information”. Moreover, the size of companies in the cashew SC does not influence the level of implementation of collaboration initiatives. The findings of this study demonstrate that the farms’ area of the companies from the cashew SC does not have a significant influence on their sustainability indicators. Furthermore, a weak relationship exists between the collaboration initiatives and the indicators associated to the three dimensions of sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward Sustainability: Supply Chain Collaboration and Governance)
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Open AccessArticle The Principal–Agent Leasing Model of “Company + n Farmers” under Two Division Modes
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 2015; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10062015
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 3 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 14 June 2018
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Abstract
The principal–agent leasing model consisting of one risk-neutral company and n risk-averse farmers is proposed by taking into consideration the characteristics of contract-farming and the fulfilment issues existing in the production process of agricultural products. We also discuss the optimal incentive coefficients and
[...] Read more.
The principal–agent leasing model consisting of one risk-neutral company and n risk-averse farmers is proposed by taking into consideration the characteristics of contract-farming and the fulfilment issues existing in the production process of agricultural products. We also discuss the optimal incentive coefficients and rents for n farmers under the two strategies of decentralization and concentration. The analysis suggests that the two division modes have no influence on the determination of the optimal effort level and the incentive coefficient of each party, and under the n farmers, the incentive coefficient given by the company to a single farmer household is not affected by the conditions of other farmer households. In terms of rent, land rent in the decentralized mode is strictly higher than land rent under the centralized mode. In the two modes of division, the total income of the company and the farmers is equal. Taking into account the randomness of the production process of agricultural products, the company will prefer to choose the centralized mode, and the farmers will tend to choose the decentralized mode in cooperation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward Sustainability: Supply Chain Collaboration and Governance)
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Open AccessArticle Toward Supply Chain Sustainability: Governance and Implementation of Joint Sustainability Development
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1658; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051658
Received: 19 April 2018 / Revised: 16 May 2018 / Accepted: 18 May 2018 / Published: 21 May 2018
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Abstract
The extant sustainability literature has argued that supply chain (SC) members can gain both financial and operational benefits from a joint sustainability development (JSD) effort. However, no guidance has been provided on how SC members could collaborate on their sustainability development efforts to
[...] Read more.
The extant sustainability literature has argued that supply chain (SC) members can gain both financial and operational benefits from a joint sustainability development (JSD) effort. However, no guidance has been provided on how SC members could collaborate on their sustainability development efforts to achieve the intended economic performance. This study addressed this research gap by proposing different contractual governances, based on a game-theoretic approach, for both manufacturer and retailer to better engage in JSD. Specifically, multiple JSD contractual arrangements regarding profit and associated cost sharing between manufacturers and retailers were defined and evaluated. Our analyses show that the manufacturer behaves opportunistically when the impact of a retailer’s effort on consumer demand is low. In other words, the retailer increases its sustainability effort, but not the manufacturer. However, such opportunistic behavior can be removed under a revenue sharing arrangement. That is, the manufacturer becomes cooperative with the retailer, and both retailer and manufacturer increase their JSD efforts. Several numerical experiments were conducted to assess the effectiveness of various revenue sharing arrangements (no sharing, partial profit sharing, and total profit sharing) in devising and implementing a mutually beneficial JSD program. Accordingly, several guidelines for the SC JSD implementation are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward Sustainability: Supply Chain Collaboration and Governance)
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Open AccessArticle The Economic Effect of Virtual Warehouse-Based Inventory Information Sharing for Sustainable Supplier Management
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1547; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051547
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 8 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 13 May 2018
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Abstract
With the rapid development of information and communication technologies, inventory information sharing between a manufacturer and its suppliers is becoming easier than ever. In line with this trend, we focus on the virtual warehouse where only inventory information on all of the material
[...] Read more.
With the rapid development of information and communication technologies, inventory information sharing between a manufacturer and its suppliers is becoming easier than ever. In line with this trend, we focus on the virtual warehouse where only inventory information on all of the material provided by the suppliers can be stored and shared. Unlike traditional supplier management, the manufacturer constructs and operates this virtual warehouse to check the inventory levels of all the required material at the same time, but each supplier can access only the information about its inventory. This virtual warehouse-based approach can foster a tight relationship between the manufacturer and its suppliers and can handle suppliers as a single company without a large investment in constructing a physical warehouse. The virtual warehouse-based approach seems to be more economically sustainable. To investigate the effect of inventory information sharing via the virtual warehouse, we developed and analyzed a system dynamics-based simulation model. The experiment results show that sharing the inventory information of the suppliers via the virtual warehouse can help manufacturers to achieve better operational performance on several important measures, such as the reduction of finished goods inventory, parts purchasing quantity, degree of backlogs, and total cost. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward Sustainability: Supply Chain Collaboration and Governance)
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Open AccessArticle Cost-Sharing Contracts for Energy Saving and Emissions Reduction of a Supply Chain under the Conditions of Government Subsidies and a Carbon Tax
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 895; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030895
Received: 18 February 2018 / Revised: 10 March 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7589 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To study the cooperation of upstream and downstream enterprises of a supply chain in energy saving and emissions reduction, we establish a Stackelberg game model. The retailer moves first to decide a cost-sharing contract, then the manufacturer determines the energy-saving level, carbon-emission level,
[...] Read more.
To study the cooperation of upstream and downstream enterprises of a supply chain in energy saving and emissions reduction, we establish a Stackelberg game model. The retailer moves first to decide a cost-sharing contract, then the manufacturer determines the energy-saving level, carbon-emission level, and wholesale price successively. In the end, the retailer determines the retail price. As a regulation, the government provides subsidies for energy-saving products, while imposing a carbon tax on the carbon emitted. The results show that (1) both the energy-saving cost-sharing (ECS) and the carbon emissions reduction cost-sharing (CCS) contracts are not the dominant strategy of the two parties by which they can facilitate energy savings and emissions reductions; (2) compared with single cost-sharing contracts, the bivariate cost-sharing (BCS) contract for energy saving and emissions reduction is superior, although it still cannot realise prefect coordination of the supply chain; (3) government subsidy and carbon tax policies can promote the cooperation of both the upstream and downstream enterprises of the supply chain—a subsidy policy can always drive energy saving and emissions reductions, while a carbon tax policy does not always exert positive effects, as it depends on the initial level of pollution and the level of carbon tax; and (4) the subsidy policy reduces the coordination efficiency of the supply chain, while the influences of carbon tax policy upon the coordination efficiency relies on the initial carbon-emission level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward Sustainability: Supply Chain Collaboration and Governance)
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