E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Recent Advances for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Reuse with Emphasis in Applications in Vulnerable Communities"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assist. Prof. Dr. Ioannis A. Katsoyiannis

Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 116, 54124, Thessaloniki, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +30-2310-97977
Interests: water treatment processes for removal of inorganic and organic contaminants: role of sorption and oxidation in contaminant removal; design and application of novel sorbents; oxidation processes in drinking water treatment, wastewater treatment and reuse, solid waste managemen

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Freshwater is crucial for human well-being and sustainable socio-economic development. Worldwide, an estimated 748 million people remain without access to an improved source of drinking water, and water demand for manufacturing is expected to increase by 400 percent between 2000 and 2050, globally. About 2.5 billion people remain without access to improved sanitation, especially in Sub-Saharan countries. A large quantity of water is wasted as wastewater, arising from several activities, such as industrial and agricultural activities. Environmental pollution, arising from the discharge of untreated wastewater, is increasing, and the quest for finding different water and wastewater treatment methods is highly encouraged, especially for developing countries and for areas which lack community piped drinking water and sufficient energy supply. Therefore, this Special Issue seeks to highlight new studies and research highlighting recent advancements with regard to water and wastewater treatment and re-use.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • New techniques for water and wastewater treatment
  • Methods for water analysis and water quality monitoring
  • Development of different materials for water and wastewater treatment
  • Application of nanotechnology in wastewater treatment process
  • Description of water utilities in developing countries
  • Case studies for the application of adsorption process for real wastewater treatment:
  • Optimization of the treatment process
  • Production of biofilters
  • Reuse of treated water and its environmental impact
  • Contaminants in water and wastewater
  • Biological wastewater treatment:
  • Zero liquid discharge
  • Brine treatment

Prof. Dr. Ioannis A. Katsoyiannis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hybrid treatment units
  • adsorption
  • oxidation
  • energy demand
  • biological water treatment
  • wastewater reuse

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Disinfection in Wastewater Treatment Plants: Evaluation of Effectiveness and Acute Toxicity Effects
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1704; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9101704
Received: 10 July 2017 / Revised: 7 September 2017 / Accepted: 19 September 2017 / Published: 22 September 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2245 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In Italy, urban wastewater disinfection is regulated in the third part of Legislative Decree n. 152/2006, which states that wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) must include a disinfection unit, with a capacity exceeding 2000 Population Equivalent (PE). This treatment shall ensure microbial quality and
[...] Read more.
In Italy, urban wastewater disinfection is regulated in the third part of Legislative Decree n. 152/2006, which states that wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) must include a disinfection unit, with a capacity exceeding 2000 Population Equivalent (PE). This treatment shall ensure microbial quality and health security. The legislation provides the following limits for wastewater: Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration below 5000 CFU 100 mL−1 (recommended value), active chlorine concentration below 0.2 mg L−1 and lack of acute toxicity. The compliance with these conditions is shown by means of the study of correct disinfectant dosage, which also depends on wastewater characteristics. An investigation at the regional level (from 2013 to 2016) shows a correlation between acute toxicity discharge and disinfection treatment through chemical reagents (mainly with the use of chlorine compounds and peracetic acid). The experimental work concerns two active sludge WWTPs in northern Italy with small capacity (10,000–12,000 PE). The activities provide the assessment of microbiological quality and toxicity of WWTPs effluents in relation to the dosage of sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid, by means of the use of batch tests. The results show that with similar disinfectant dosage and comparable initial E. coli concentration, peracetic acid exhibits the best performance in terms of microbial removal (with removal yields up to 99.99%). Moreover, the acute toxicity was evident at higher doses and therefore with higher residuals of peracetic acid (2.68 mg L−1) compared to the free residual chlorine (0.17 mg L−1). Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Use of Novel Composite Coagulants for Arsenic Removal from Waters—Experimental Insight for the Application of Polyferric Sulfate (PFS)
Sustainability 2017, 9(4), 590; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9040590
Received: 13 February 2017 / Revised: 9 April 2017 / Accepted: 10 April 2017 / Published: 12 April 2017
PDF Full-text (964 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the present study, several pre-polymerized coagulants of iron and aluminum were tested for their efficiency towards As(V) and As(III) removal from water sources. The results showed that the pre-polymerized coagulants of iron, such as poly-ferric sulfate and poly-ferric silicate chloride, were very
[...] Read more.
In the present study, several pre-polymerized coagulants of iron and aluminum were tested for their efficiency towards As(V) and As(III) removal from water sources. The results showed that the pre-polymerized coagulants of iron, such as poly-ferric sulfate and poly-ferric silicate chloride, were very efficient for As(V) removal. With regard to As(III) removal, among all examined coagulants, including the conventional ferric chloride, only the poly-ferric sulfate (PFS) was able to reduce As(III) to concentrations below the drinking water regulation limit of 10 μg/L. In contrast, all tested composite coagulants based on aluminum were not capable of removing efficiently both species of arsenic. PFS addition in water containing 4 mM of alkalinity and 25 μg/L of As(V) and As(III) (i.e., total arsenic concentration 50 μg/L) resulted in finished water with less than 5 μg/L arsenic, only by dosing 5 mg Fe-PFS/L at pH 7, whereas, simultaneously, the residual iron concentration was found well below its drinking water regulation limit of 200 μg/L. The use of PFS could provide a viable alternative for As(III) and As(V) removal at household treatment level for application in vulnerable communities, without the need of any additional treatment, such as oxidation of As(III) to As(V). Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Efficiency of Iron-Based Oxy-Hydroxides in Removing Antimony from Groundwater to Levels below the Drinking Water Regulation Limits
Sustainability 2017, 9(2), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9020238
Received: 22 November 2016 / Revised: 16 January 2017 / Accepted: 5 February 2017 / Published: 10 February 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3041 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study evaluates the efficiency of iron-based oxy-hydroxides to remove antimony from groundwater to meet the requirements of drinking water regulations. Results obtained by batch adsorption experiments indicated that the qualified iron oxy-hydroxide (FeOOH), synthesized at pH 4 for maintaining a high positive
[...] Read more.
This study evaluates the efficiency of iron-based oxy-hydroxides to remove antimony from groundwater to meet the requirements of drinking water regulations. Results obtained by batch adsorption experiments indicated that the qualified iron oxy-hydroxide (FeOOH), synthesized at pH 4 for maintaining a high positive charge density (2.5 mmol OH/g) achieved a residual concentration of Sb(III) below the EU drinking water regulation limit of 5 μg/L by providing an adsorption capacity of 3.1 mg/g. This is more than twice greater compared either to similar commercial FeOOHs (GFH, Bayoxide) or to tetravalent manganese feroxyhyte (Fe-MnOOH) adsorbents. In contrast, all tested adsorbents failed to achieve a residual concentration below 5 μg/L for Sb(V). The higher efficiency of the qualified FeOOH was confirmed by rapid small-scale column tests, since an adsorption capacity of 3 mg Sb(III)/g was determined at a breakthrough concentration of 5 μg/L. However, it completely failed to achieve Sb(V) concentrations below 5 μg/L even at the beginning of the column experiments. The results of leaching tests classified the spent qualified FeOOH to inert wastes. Considering the rapid kinetics of this process (i.e., 85% of total removal was performed within 10 min), the developed qualified adsorbent may be promoted as a prospective material for point-of-use Sb(III) removal from water in vulnerable communities, since the adsorbent’s cost was estimated to be close to 30 ± 3.4 €/103 m3 for every 10 μg Sb(III)/L removed. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top