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Special Issue "Decarbonised Economy"

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A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Julien Chevallier

Department of Economics, University Paris 8, 2 rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis Cedex, France
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +33 1 49 40 72 55
Interests: finance of commodity markets; applied econometrics; energy and climate change economics; environmental and resource economics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Sustainability is dedicated to the analytical solutions and development pathways that could be put forth in the mid- to long-term in order to reach a “de-carbonized economy”. Against the global warming background, the bleak future that has been promised to us by the Nobel-prize winning IPCC reports urges us to take instant action, without consideration of costs, to preserve the well-being of future generations. Alas, we are currently in a situation of “technological lock-in” in many critical sectors of production, from agriculture to transport and industrial processes, which prevents us from taking such necessary bold steps. The context of the 2008 financial crisis has also critically impacted the trends in climate change policies, with no successor to the Kyoto Protocol—to date.
To foster attention on these critical issues, we welcome submissions of theoretical and applied papers, as well as critical reviews of the extant literature, which address one or more practical (case-studies) or theoretical (economics, political science) solutions to progress towards decarbonized economies.  Topical areas for consideration include, but are not limited to, the economics of decarbonization, CO2 emissions, carbon price, low-carbon technologies and policies, power-generation, transport, agriculture, and all aspects of climate change.

Prof. Dr. Julien Chevallier
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • economics of decarbonization
  • climate stabilization
  • global warming
  • CO2 emissions
  • carbon price
  • low-carbon technologies and policies
  • power-generation
  • transport
  • agriculture
  • industry

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Sustainable Complex Triangular Cells for the Evaluation of CO2 Emissions by Individuals instead of Nations in a Scenario for 2030
Sustainability 2013, 5(5), 1944-1959; doi:10.3390/su5051944
Received: 1 March 2013 / Revised: 22 April 2013 / Accepted: 24 April 2013 / Published: 2 May 2013
PDF Full-text (676 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The concept of sustainable complex triangular cells may be applied to an individual of any human society. This concept was introduced in two recent articles. A case study was proposed to show the applicability of this new concept to Indian populations without contact
[...] Read more.
The concept of sustainable complex triangular cells may be applied to an individual of any human society. This concept was introduced in two recent articles. A case study was proposed to show the applicability of this new concept to Indian populations without contact with civilization and with a low environmental impact. Here we propose to apply this concept to a recent study, which claims that the concept of “common but differentiated responsibilities” refers to the emissions of individuals instead of nations. The income distribution of a country was used to estimate how its fossil fuel CO2 emissions are distributed among its citizens and, from that a global CO2 distribution was constructed. We propose the extension of the concept of complex triangular cells where its area would be equivalent to the CO2 emission per individual. In addition, a new three-dimensional geometric model for the regular hexagonal structure is offered in which the sharing of natural resources (human cooperation) is employed to reduce CO2 emissions in two scenarios by 2030. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Decarbonised Economy)
Open AccessArticle Sustainable Mobility: Using a Global Energy Model to Inform Vehicle Technology Choices in a Decarbonized Economy
Sustainability 2013, 5(5), 1845-1862; doi:10.3390/su5051845
Received: 25 March 2013 / Revised: 11 April 2013 / Accepted: 15 April 2013 / Published: 29 April 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2261 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The reduction of CO2 emissions associated with vehicle use is an important element of a global transition to sustainable mobility and is a major long-term challenge for society. Vehicle and fuel technologies are part of a global energy system, and assessing the
[...] Read more.
The reduction of CO2 emissions associated with vehicle use is an important element of a global transition to sustainable mobility and is a major long-term challenge for society. Vehicle and fuel technologies are part of a global energy system, and assessing the impact of the availability of clean energy technologies and advanced vehicle technologies on sustainable mobility is a complex task. The global energy transition (GET) model accounts for interactions between the different energy sectors, and we illustrate its use to inform vehicle technology choices in a decarbonizing economy. The aim of this study is to assess how uncertainties in future vehicle technology cost, as well as how developments in other energy sectors, affect cost-effective fuel and vehicle technology choices. Given the uncertainties in future costs and efficiencies for light-duty vehicle and fuel technologies, there is no clear fuel/vehicle technology winner that can be discerned at the present time. We conclude that a portfolio approach with research and development of multiple fuel and vehicle technology pathways is the best way forward to achieve the desired result of affordable and sustainable personal mobility. The practical ramifications of this analysis are illustrated in the portfolio approach to providing sustainable mobility adopted by the Ford Motor Company. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Decarbonised Economy)
Open AccessArticle Towards More Sustainable Ironmaking—An Analysis of Energy Wood Availability in Finland and the Economics of Charcoal Production
Sustainability 2013, 5(3), 1188-1207; doi:10.3390/su5031188
Received: 5 February 2013 / Revised: 5 March 2013 / Accepted: 6 March 2013 / Published: 19 March 2013
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (835 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Replacement of fossil carbon by renewable biomass-based carbon is an effective measure to mitigate CO2 emission intensity in the blast furnace ironmaking process. Depending on the substitution rate of fossil fuels, the required amount of biomass can be substantial. This raises questions
[...] Read more.
Replacement of fossil carbon by renewable biomass-based carbon is an effective measure to mitigate CO2 emission intensity in the blast furnace ironmaking process. Depending on the substitution rate of fossil fuels, the required amount of biomass can be substantial. This raises questions about the availability of biomass for multiple uses. At the same time, the economic competitiveness of biomass-based fuels in ironmaking applications should also be a key consideration. In this assessment, availability of energy wood, i.e., logging residues, small-diameter wood and stumps, in Finland is discussed. Since biomass must be submitted to a thermochemical process before use in a blast furnace, the paper describes the production chain, from biomass to charcoal, and economics related to each processing step. The economics of biomass-based reducing agents is compared to fossil-based ones by taking into account the effect of European Union Emissions Trading System (EU ETS). The assessment reveals that there would be sufficient amounts of energy wood available for current users as well as for ironmaking. At present, the economics of biomass-based reducing agents in ironmaking applications is unfavorable. High CO2 emission allowance prices would be required to make such a scheme competitive against fossil-based reducing agents at current fuel prices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Decarbonised Economy)

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