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Special Issue "Sustainable Management of Geomorphological Heritage"

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A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability of Culture and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maria Helena Henriques

Departamento de Ciências da Terra, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia (Polo II), Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Sílvio Lima, 3039-790 Coimbra, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +351 239 860 501
Interests: palaeontology; biostratigraphy; jurassic; geoconservation; education for sustainable development; science communication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability is probably the most important goal for mankind in this century. It requires the huge challenge of achieving fragile balances: between people and communities, fostering social and economic development, and between people and the earth, aiming at the appropriate use of its resources. The growing population of the planet and the increasing consumption of its resources make conservation difficult for future generations. Therefore, heightened social responsibility towards the use of Earth’s resources is needed, specifically of its geomorphological elements with exceptional scientific, educational, touristic or cultural value—the geomorphological heritage—represented by geomorphosites.

This Special Issue aims to focus on the scope and methods of conservation of geomorphological heritage, as well as the knowledge, problems, materials, instruments and/or services that it provides to mankind as a tool to implement sustainable development. Research on the use of the geomorphological heritage to promote the establishment of strong links with society is welcome, whether they refer to actions under the frame of nature conservation policy and land-use planning, education for sustainable development, and/or geotourism.

Thus, this Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive overview of current research activities related to this topical theme.

Prof. Dr. Maria Helena Henriques
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • geodiversity
  • geomorphosite
  • landscape
  • territory
  • inventory
  • mapping
  • assessment
  • management
  • monitoring
  • communication
  • education for sustainable development
  • nature conservation policy
  • land-use planning
  • geotourism

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Assessing and Monitoring the Sustainability in Rural World Heritage Sites
Sustainability 2015, 7(10), 14186-14210; doi:10.3390/su71014186
Received: 27 February 2015 / Revised: 12 October 2015 / Accepted: 15 October 2015 / Published: 21 October 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1162 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In 2002, the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) established the importance of the sustainability and the need of management plans for the safeguard of cultural heritage. No models, rules or specific definitions have been provided for this purpose. By 2014,
[...] Read more.
In 2002, the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) established the importance of the sustainability and the need of management plans for the safeguard of cultural heritage. No models, rules or specific definitions have been provided for this purpose. By 2014, UNESCO had recognized 16 rural landscapes as cultural heritage sites. This paper aims to understand the management systems adopted by the rural World Heritage Sites over time in order to identify the best practices, strategies, actions and measures applied for the conservation of their universal value with a particular focus on sustainability. A comparative study, analyzing the management plans for these sites, was conducted. The drawing up of site management plans for such rural landscapes is a difficult process. In fact, private and public authorities and several stakeholders are involved, and all of them should participate actively in the decision making process. To ensure the sustainability of these sites, it is important to evaluate several parameters and to design an integrated plan. We focused on assessing and monitoring sustainability in rural World Heritage Sites, and our results could be useful for the implementation of existing plans and processes for drawing up management plans for future UNESCO cultural heritage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Geomorphological Heritage)
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Open AccessArticle Assessment and Management of the Geomorphological Heritage of Monte Pindo (NW Spain): A Landscape as a Symbol of Identity
Sustainability 2015, 7(6), 7049-7085; doi:10.3390/su7067049
Received: 13 March 2015 / Revised: 4 May 2015 / Accepted: 21 May 2015 / Published: 2 June 2015
PDF Full-text (1047 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study focuses on the granite mountain known as Monte Pindo (627 m above sea level) in the Autonomous Community of Galicia (NW Spain). This territory is included in the area classified as “Costa da Morte” in the “Politica de
[...] Read more.
This study focuses on the granite mountain known as Monte Pindo (627 m above sea level) in the Autonomous Community of Galicia (NW Spain). This territory is included in the area classified as “Costa da Morte” in the “Politica de Ordenación Litoral” (POL) (Coastal Planning Policy) for the region of Galicia. This coastal unit, located between “Rías Baixas” and “Cape Fisterra” has great potential for demonstrating geological processes and its geomorphological heritage is characterized by a high degree of geodiversity of granite landforms. The main objective of our work is to assess the geomorphological heritage of the site, thus revealing its wide geodiversity. We shall analyze and highlight: its scientific value, developing an inventory of granite landforms; its educational valuel and its geotouristic potential. It must be ensured that the Administration understands that natural diversity is composed of both geodiversity and biodiversity. Only then will the sustainable management of Monte Pindo become possible by integrating natural and cultural heritage values. The goal is to ensure that Monte Pindo and its immediate surroundings become a geopark with the aim of promoting local development projects based on the conservation and valorization of its geological heritage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Geomorphological Heritage)
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Open AccessArticle Community Involvement in Geoconservation: A Conceptual Approach Based on the Geoheritage of South Angola
Sustainability 2015, 7(5), 4893-4918; doi:10.3390/su7054893
Received: 24 March 2015 / Revised: 17 April 2015 / Accepted: 20 April 2015 / Published: 24 April 2015
PDF Full-text (6301 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, it is argued that effective protection of geological objects displaying heritage value requires the local community’s involvement in all geoconservation actions, i.e., inventory, evaluation, conservation, valuation and monitoring procedures, and not only at the final part of the process,
[...] Read more.
In this work, it is argued that effective protection of geological objects displaying heritage value requires the local community’s involvement in all geoconservation actions, i.e., inventory, evaluation, conservation, valuation and monitoring procedures, and not only at the final part of the process, when it is expected from local communities that the physical integrity of such objects is guaranteed. Community involvement in geoheritage inventory and evaluation procedures can be appraised by using a classification system that integrates both the geoheritage properties displayed by the geological objects and usually recognized by geoscientists (i.e., relevance grade) and the social role attributed to geological objects by communities outside Earth scientists that arise from the public perception of such objects (i.e., abstract perceptiveness). Using two case studies from southern Angola (Huíla Province) where both social and scientific components were taken into account in geoheritage evaluation procedures (Tundavala and Leba geosites), we propose a conceptual community-based model, which can be applicable to geoconservation purposes and actions in other African regions and converging with the main goals of the “African Alive Corridors” initiative. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Geomorphological Heritage)
Open AccessArticle The Geological Characterization of Landscape in Major TV Series: A Suggested Approach to Involve the Public in the Geological Heritage Promotion
Sustainability 2015, 7(4), 4100-4119; doi:10.3390/su7044100
Received: 26 February 2015 / Revised: 26 March 2015 / Accepted: 30 March 2015 / Published: 8 April 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5118 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The characterization of natural and cultural heritage using popular entertainment, such as TV movies and series, can become an effective and original way to involve society in protecting territory and enhancing local development, thanks to the dissemination of knowledge. The aim is to
[...] Read more.
The characterization of natural and cultural heritage using popular entertainment, such as TV movies and series, can become an effective and original way to involve society in protecting territory and enhancing local development, thanks to the dissemination of knowledge. The aim is to make the complex aspects of landscape related to its geological and ecological assessment understandable to the public. The tools here proposed are the episodes of the TV series “Inspector Montalbano” filmed in Sicily. The stories, written by Andrea Camilleri, are located in Sicily (the biggest Italian island in the southern Mediterranean Sea), in particular with some World Heritage Sites. The natural and cultural landscapes, which provide fascinating scenery to the films, represent a meaning in the representation of the plot. At the same time, if recognized and understood, they become part of the cultural heritage of each component of the local community and of society. The cognitive process activates a virtuous circle revitalizing the links between humanity and environment. Moreover, it promotes a creative participation of the public in new policies, oriented towards sustainable development, and tourism—especially geotourism and ecotourism—becomes an important resource, especially in these times of crisis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Geomorphological Heritage)
Open AccessArticle Geoheritage at the Equator: Selected Geosites of São Tomé Island (Cameron Line, Central Africa)
Sustainability 2015, 7(1), 648-667; doi:10.3390/su7010648
Received: 2 December 2014 / Accepted: 30 December 2014 / Published: 7 January 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (4133 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work presents, for the first time, an overview of the rich geodiversity outcropping in the São Tomé island, one of the two islands that make up the archipelago of São Tomé and Príncipe, the second smallest state of Africa in area. Located
[...] Read more.
This work presents, for the first time, an overview of the rich geodiversity outcropping in the São Tomé island, one of the two islands that make up the archipelago of São Tomé and Príncipe, the second smallest state of Africa in area. Located at the equator, in the alignment known as the “Cameroon Volcanic Line”, this archipelago represents a privileged area for the comparative study between oceanic and continental alkaline volcanism, and therefore between the subcontinental and suboceanic mantle. Ten geosites of São Tomé island were selected, described and evaluated on the basis of their geoheritage value and using a qualitative system of classification, which integrates both the meaning attributed to the objects by scientific communities and the public understanding of such meanings related to its social use. The selected geosites display different heritage values (documental, scenic, symbolic, iconographic and indicial) potentially usable for different purposes, namely scientific and educational, but mostly tourism. Geotourism can play a key role in the promotion of sustainable development in the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe, and the geosites here described are likely to ground a geo-itinerary on this “pearl” of the Cameron Line. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Geomorphological Heritage)
Open AccessArticle 3D Virtual Itinerary for Education Using Google Earth as a Tool for the Recovery of the Geological Heritage of Natural Areas: Application in the “Las Batuecas Valley” Nature Park (Salamanca, Spain)
Sustainability 2014, 6(12), 8567-8591; doi:10.3390/su6128567
Received: 11 October 2014 / Revised: 18 November 2014 / Accepted: 19 November 2014 / Published: 27 November 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (13730 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this study is to develop a methodology that enhances the value and position of the geological heritage of any natural area in the world using a 3D virtual itinerary. Field applications of this geological itinerary enable students to participate actively
[...] Read more.
The objective of this study is to develop a methodology that enhances the value and position of the geological heritage of any natural area in the world using a 3D virtual itinerary. Field applications of this geological itinerary enable students to participate actively in teaching and learning theoretical concepts in the earth sciences and engineering. The educational resources, which include a virtual itinerary, a flight simulator, a field notebook with questionnaires, videos, and an augmented reality developed with Google Earth, provide a familiar and effective learning environment that can be implemented by students daily using new technologies (smartphones, tablets, and iPods) and can leverage the power of computer games to achieve the objectives of a specific curriculum. The implementation of geological content in an interactive, educational game has been employed in compulsory levels of secondary education, high school, and college in Batuecas Valley. The geomatic applications are free as they can be accessed from existing computer labs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Geomorphological Heritage)
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Review

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Open AccessReview The Vie Cave Geomorphological Site in Southern Tuscany (Italy): Problems of Decay and Conservation
Sustainability 2015, 7(6), 7530-7547; doi:10.3390/su7067530
Received: 20 March 2015 / Revised: 28 April 2015 / Accepted: 1 June 2015 / Published: 11 June 2015
PDF Full-text (744 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Vie Cave are a suggestive network of roads deeply entrenched in the rock, dating back to the Etruscan civilization; these ancient roads connect various settlements and necropolises existing mainly in the area of Sovana, Sorano and Pitigliano towns (Southern Tuscany, Italy). The
[...] Read more.
The Vie Cave are a suggestive network of roads deeply entrenched in the rock, dating back to the Etruscan civilization; these ancient roads connect various settlements and necropolises existing mainly in the area of Sovana, Sorano and Pitigliano towns (Southern Tuscany, Italy). The Vie Cave are located in a peculiar geomorphological site, characterized by the presence of extensive pyroclastic deposits, which have been incised by a parallel network of deep gorges. In this paper, the geomorphological, geological and lithological setting of the Vie Cave area, where several Etruscan archaeological sites are found, are described. The precarious stability of the Vie Cave walls and the several archaeological structures carved into them, the high grade of decay shown by the constituent materials, together with the dense vegetation that has developed over the rocky scarps, are taken into account with the aim to provide a complete assessment of the conditions in which the site lies. Finally, we propose some targeted actions related to the preservation of this territory, showing so distinctive morphology, in order to protect the area from further decay to which it would be subjected if it remained abandoned. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Geomorphological Heritage)

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