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Special Issue "Coastal Ecosystems: Monitoring, Management, Restoration, Preservation, and Valuation"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Paul C. Sutton

Department of Geography and the Environment, University of Denver, 2050 East Iliff Avenue Denver, CO 80208-0710, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: population geography; ecological economics; sustainability science; urbanization science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal ecosystems are vital to human survival and well-being. This Special Issue of Sustainability seeks papers that provide case studies of coastal ecosystems that focus on solutions to the diverse challenges associated with the following: Understanding coastal processes, mitigating damage to coastal areas, sustainable management of coastal lands, and enhancing human value of coastal ecosystems for the fundamental contributions coastal ecosystems make to human well-being.

Prof. Dr. Paul C. Sutton
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coastal Ecosystems
  • Ecosystem Service Valuation
  • Scenario Planning

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Revisiting Ecosystem Services: Assessment and Valuation as Starting Points for Environmental Politics
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1755; doi:10.3390/su9101755
Received: 21 August 2017 / Revised: 24 September 2017 / Accepted: 26 September 2017 / Published: 28 September 2017
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Abstract
The paradigm of ecosystem services (ES) and the methods of monetary valuation have become boundary objects, spanning disciplines and earning particular purchase in policy circles. However, the notion of ES and ES valuation have also been subjected to multiple critiques, ranging from their
[...] Read more.
The paradigm of ecosystem services (ES) and the methods of monetary valuation have become boundary objects, spanning disciplines and earning particular purchase in policy circles. However, the notion of ES and ES valuation have also been subjected to multiple critiques, ranging from their varying precision to the potential for neoliberalization of nature. This paper does not attempt to refute such critiques but rather revisits the potentials of the ES paradigm and the specific method of benefit transfer valuation for their utility as a form of environmental politics and sustainability practice. We find they have particular relevance in contexts where “data” are not readily available or are not legible to policy makers as well as where the imperative of “development” remains ideological. We argue for ES assessment and, specifically, rapid ES valuation as a first-pass tactic to inform evaluation of potentially environmentally degrading projects or environmental management. We demonstrate this using a simple benefit transfer analysis to offer an initial evaluation of (wet) landscape ES in a lightly touched estuary in Karnataka, India, where a state-backed proposal to develop an industrial shipping port is gathering steam. While we recognize and do not categorically reject critiques of the ES paradigm, we nonetheless argue for valuation as a starting point for politics that highlight and make visible ES benefits and users implicated by “development” and other kinds of environmental change. Full article
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Open AccessArticle LaVegMod v2: Modeling Coastal Vegetation Dynamics in Response to Proposed Coastal Restoration and Protection Projects in Louisiana, USA
Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1625; doi:10.3390/su9091625
Received: 31 July 2017 / Revised: 24 August 2017 / Accepted: 8 September 2017 / Published: 13 September 2017
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Abstract
We have developed a computer model of plant community dynamics for Louisiana’s coastal wetland ecosystems. The model was improved as a part of the Louisiana Coastal Master Plan of 2017 and is one of several linked models used to evaluate the potential effects
[...] Read more.
We have developed a computer model of plant community dynamics for Louisiana’s coastal wetland ecosystems. The model was improved as a part of the Louisiana Coastal Master Plan of 2017 and is one of several linked models used to evaluate the potential effects of climate change and sea levels rise as well as the potential effects of alternative approaches to managing the region’s natural resources to mitigate the effects of sea level rise. The model we describe here incorporates a number of improvements over the previous version of the model developed for the 2012 Master Plan, including an expansion of the number of species and habitat types represented, the inclusion of bottomland forests and barrier islands, and the incorporation of additional ecological processes such as dispersal. Here, we present results from the model used to evaluate large scale ecosystem restoration projects, as well as three alternative management scenarios to illustrate the utility of the model and the ability of current management plans to address the threats that sea level rise pose to Louisiana’s coastal wetland ecosystems. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Research on the Coupling Coordination of a Sea–Land System Based on an Integrated Approach and New Evaluation Index System: A Case Study in Hainan Province, China
Sustainability 2017, 9(5), 859; doi:10.3390/su9050859
Received: 24 February 2017 / Revised: 29 April 2017 / Accepted: 16 May 2017 / Published: 19 May 2017
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Abstract
Based on the concept of sea–land coordination and the statistical data of Hainan Province from 1999 to 2013, we establish a new evaluation index system included four aspects—economic development, social progress, environmental protection and resource efficiency—and use the integrated approach (such as the
[...] Read more.
Based on the concept of sea–land coordination and the statistical data of Hainan Province from 1999 to 2013, we establish a new evaluation index system included four aspects—economic development, social progress, environmental protection and resource efficiency—and use the integrated approach (such as the combination weight method, the coupling coordination degree model, the scissors difference model and the dynamic coupling coordination degree model) to measure the coupling coordination degree of a sea–land system. The results show that: (1) the overall development level of sea system and land system are gradually improved; (2) the coupling coordination degree of sea–land system is gradually from moderately uncoordinated to well coordinated, and the comprehensive evaluation value of sea system has a greater effect on the coupling coordination degree than that of land system; (3) the scissors difference between sea system and land system is gradually increasing; (4) the dynamic coupling coordination degree of the sea–land system which favors a parabolic shape is basically in the break-in development stage; (5) in the process of sea–land system coordination, the influencing factors of economic development, the social progress and resource efficiency should be given priority and, at the same time, strengthen the environmental protection efforts and awareness to promote the role of environmental protection in the sea–land coordination. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Retrieval of sea surface temperature from MODIS data in coastal waters

Authors: Rosa Maria Cavalli
Abstract: Literature highlights that an accurate measurement of sea surface temperature (SST) retrieved from remote images is fundamental for monitoring ocean and coastal waters. This study proposes a method for retrieving accurate measurements of SST in coastal waters. The method involves the estimation of effect of total suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration on the value of sea surface emissivity (SSE) and the inclusion of this effect in SSE value which is put into SST calculation. Data collected in three Italian coastal waters were exploited to obtain SSTskin and SSE values and to analyze SPM effects on SSE value. The method was tested on MODIS images. Satellite measurements of SST obtained with current operational algorithm, which doesn’t require SSE value as explicit input, were compared with in situ values of SSTskin and RMSD is equal to 1.13K. Moreover, SST data were retrieved with Niclos et al. [1] algorithm which allows to include SSE value with SPM effect. And these data were compared with in situ values of SSTskin and RMSD is equal to 0.68K.
Keywords: coastal water; sea surface emissivity; sea surface temperature; total suspended particulate matter.

Title: Mitigating Erosional Effects Induced by Boat Wakes with Living Shorelines
Authors: Deidre Herbert, Emily Astrom, Ada Bersoza, Pat McGovern, Scott Wasman, Christine Angelini, Alex Sheremet
Abstract: Since the creation of the Intracoastal Waterway, the Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve in St. Augustine, FL has experienced increased boat traffic along its coastlines due to the dredging of the Tolomato River. This opened the channel to bigger boats responsible for creating large, repetitive boat wakes that induce biological stress and morphological changes along the coastline. This high-energy environment has resulted in loss of surrounding oyster reefs and salt marsh vegetation, ultimately leading to shoreline erosion. To prevent further retreat of the estuary’s edges, living shorelines structures have been installed at six field sites within the GTM reserve. These are natural shoreline stabilization techniques consisting of a combination of oyster restoration structures and wooden breakwalls. We expect these two structures will work together to halt shoreline erosion and promote marsh progradation. To anticipate their performance over time, OpenFOAM, a computational fluid dynamics modeling software, will be used to simulate the erosional effects surrounding these breakwalls.

Title: The effects of low enthalpy geothermal system on groundwater of the cesine wetland.
Authors: Livia Emanuela Zuffianò
Abstract: The Cesine Wetland is located in Salento Peninsula, Southern Italy and it was recognized as “wetland of international interest”. The environmental peculiarities of the area are due to a complex hydrogeological pattern, the high contribution of groundwater outflow, and to a peculiar dynamic equilibrium with sea, also due to the role of the wide coastal aquifer of Salento. The visit center was selected for the construction of a low-enthalpy geothermal power plant as part of a pilot project funded by the EU IPA Legend 2007-2013 Adriatic and represents the unique case in a protected wetland, made to monitoring the environmental effects of heat exchange of geothermal field probes. After geological and hydrogeological characterization of the area, it was developed the heat transport numerical model with FeFlow, in order to estimate the extension of the thermal plume generated within the aquifers after a long period of heat exchange. Initial simulation results have contributed to the evaluation of geothermal plant influence on groundwater, a fundamental resource ensuring the existence of wetlands.

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