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Special Issue "Resilient Architectural and Urban Design"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Assistant Prof. Dr. Yi-Chang Chiang

Department of Architecture and Urban Design, Chinese Culture University, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: climate change adaptation; resilient city; green building; rural regeneration; sustainable development
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chris Zevenbergen

1. Water Science & Engineering Department, UNESCO-IHE, The Netherlands;
2. Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: flood resilience; urban planning; water management; disaster management; urban governance; climate adaptation
Guest Editor
Dr. Peter van der Keur

Department of Hydrology, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Denmark
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hydrological modelling (urban, catchment); adaptive water management; climate impact; resilience; disaster risk management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cities are already facing more frequent and severe extreme weather and climate events in recent decades. The World Bank indicated Taiwan as the place on Earth most vulnerable to natural hazards in 2005; Typhoon Morakot 2009 broke records by unleashing over 2500 millimeters of rainfall in five days in Taiwan, causing destructive landslides. Taipei City has addressed 2016 “Adaptive City—Design in Motion” as a core appeal in hosting World Design Capital that recognizes cities for their ability to effectively use “design and architecture” as a catalyst to drive economic, social, cultural, and environmental development. The shift of focus from vulnerability to adaptation introduced by Taiwan has marked a transformational societal change that seeks to explore and confront the future challenges facing sustainability.

For cities to be sustainable, they must be resilient. This Special Issue focuses on a city’s resilient performance through architectural and urban design. Introducing resilience into the architecture and design of new developments is not always straightforward, but in recent years considerable progress has been made despite the uncertainties and complexities of understanding the interacting systems and services. Retrofitting the existing urban fabric to produce resilience appears to be lagging behind and even more complex in many cities. The Special Issue seeks to synthesize state-of-the-art knowledge on theories and practices of resilient cities worldwide at the building, community, and urban–rural scales in order to better respond to natural and man-made disasters and disturbances, as well as climate change related risks from extreme events, such as heat waves, heavy precipitation, and coastal flooding.

The Special Issue will comprise selected papers from the Symposium on Resilient Architectural and Urban Design 2017 (RAUD2017) and other papers related to “Resilient Architectural and Urban Design”. Authors who will present their papers at the symposium will be invited to submit their manuscripts to the Guest Editors for preliminary evaluation. Accepted papers will be then submitted by the authors to the open access journal Sustainability and enter the peer-review process. Researchers who cannot attend the symposium are also allowed to submit manuscripts to the Special Issue.

Assistant Prof. Dr. Yi-Chang Chiang
Prof. Dr. Chris Zevenbergen
Dr. Peter van der Keur
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • resilient design
  • architecture
  • urban design
  • adaptive management

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Making Less Vulnerable Cities: Resilience as a New Paradigm of Smart Planning
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030755
Received: 30 December 2017 / Revised: 3 March 2018 / Accepted: 3 March 2018 / Published: 9 March 2018
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Abstract
Previous studies have investigated how resilience can play a pivotal role in strategic urban design in the Netherlands and in some regional and municipal planning laws in Italy. Here, we have analysed several European projects that utilised the resilience approach successfully. Dutch policies
[...] Read more.
Previous studies have investigated how resilience can play a pivotal role in strategic urban design in the Netherlands and in some regional and municipal planning laws in Italy. Here, we have analysed several European projects that utilised the resilience approach successfully. Dutch policies already include resilience and climate adaptation in urban strategies. Moreover, they share those strategies with urban communities, making the innovation of the city real and cutting-edge. In Italy, on the other hand, the concept of resilience is present only in some regional laws and is still not used as an urban tool. In this paper, we aim to demonstrate how resilience can become the new paradigm of smart planning. Furthermore, we demonstrate how resilience is fundamental at all levels of urban intervention, involving municipal authorities, architects and urban planners, firms and enterprises, citizens and communities. The urban governance must establish specific goals and objectives to create a smart and sustainable city. Resilience should be one of these main aims, in order to achieve an innovative city design. A climate strategy should also be part of urban smart planning, enabling the implementation of a safer and resilient city. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Architectural and Urban Design)
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Open AccessArticle Towards Urban Resilience through Inter-City Networks of Co-Invention: A Case Study of U.S. Cities
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020289
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 16 January 2018 / Accepted: 16 January 2018 / Published: 24 January 2018
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Abstract
Knowledge creation involves social and collaborative processes with local and extra-local partners. The space of knowledge flows functions as a system of networks where knowledge is transmitted around different alignments of agents in distant places. Scholars argue that the concept of urban resilience
[...] Read more.
Knowledge creation involves social and collaborative processes with local and extra-local partners. The space of knowledge flows functions as a system of networks where knowledge is transmitted around different alignments of agents in distant places. Scholars argue that the concept of urban resilience combines local and extra-local competencies to develop an inter-city system, this is a major strategy for cities to mitigate and adapt to climate change and economic recession. Little attention has been given to the role of networks in co-invention and few empirical studies have been conducted. This article provides insights into the structure of inter-city networks of co-invention by examining the relative importance of the network compared with spatial proximity in biotechnology co-patenting across 150 American cities from 1983 to 2013. Results show that the U.S. inter-city structure gradually becomes more explicit, apparent, and identifiable in the network-based system. Network proximity better defines the biotechnology co-patenting relationships among the U.S. cities compared with spatial proximity. The current inter-city networks of co-invention are mostly regional, with some national but few local ties. This structure provides a way to develop mitigation and adaptation policies for climate disasters or economic recessions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Architectural and Urban Design)
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Open AccessArticle Designing a Climate-Resilient Environmental Curriculum—A Transdisciplinary Challenge
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010077
Received: 7 November 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 22 December 2017 / Published: 29 December 2017
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Abstract
Building resilience is a promising transdisciplinary area that contributes to addressing the impacts of climate change. This paper focused on the design of climate-resilient environmental curriculums to enhance environmental quality. Transdisciplinary approaches have been recognized as being well-placed to assist responses to climate
[...] Read more.
Building resilience is a promising transdisciplinary area that contributes to addressing the impacts of climate change. This paper focused on the design of climate-resilient environmental curriculums to enhance environmental quality. Transdisciplinary approaches have been recognized as being well-placed to assist responses to climate change, which is a complex phenomenon and problem. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore how climate-resilient environmental education can be integrated into the design, implementation, and practice transdisciplinary manner into curriculums. Transdisciplinary curriculum design is an important factor determining the quality of modules, especially in the field of environmental design, due to its real-life setting characteristics. As students are trained with new projects, and under different socioeconomic and environmental conditions, curriculum design requires modification. Moreover, promoting transdisciplinary studies is a new trend that influences curriculum design. Compared to the interdisciplinary approach, the transdisciplinary approach is concerned with issues and subjects that exist between disciplines, across different disciplines, and beyond all the disciplines, leading to an immense space of new knowledge. This approach leads to integrated research that involves non-academic participants. We concluded that the transdisciplinary approach is beneficial for students in two ways: better performance in practical modules, and addresses the real interests of the students. Feedback from students about the curriculum design suggested that, to consider the individual student’s personal circumstances, multiple training methods should be used. The transdisciplinary approach to climate-resilient environmental curriculum design using a participative process amongst stakeholders is crucial; however, in this study, different opinions amongst interviewed tutors may obstruct the realization of the students’ wishes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Architectural and Urban Design)
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Open AccessArticle Environmental Risks or Costs? Exploring Flooding and the Urban Heat Island Effect in Planning for Policymaking: A Case Study in the Southern Taiwan Science Park
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2239; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9122239
Received: 30 September 2017 / Revised: 27 November 2017 / Accepted: 29 November 2017 / Published: 4 December 2017
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Abstract
This study examined a specific case of planning for policymaking in response to two physical environmental issues: flooding and the urban heat island effect (UHI). The Southern Taiwan Science Park (STSP) was selected as a case study. Data were primarily collected through interviews
[...] Read more.
This study examined a specific case of planning for policymaking in response to two physical environmental issues: flooding and the urban heat island effect (UHI). The Southern Taiwan Science Park (STSP) was selected as a case study. Data were primarily collected through interviews as well as through policy review. The assessment showed significant differences in policymaking when comparing these two issues. The issue of flooding was considered and managed well. The UHI, however, was poorly considered or ignored altogether in policymaking, even though it has shown an increasing trend over the last decades, to a greater degree in the STSP than in the city centre. The results implied that the neoliberal approach to planning of decision-making performed better in managing risks (i.e., flooding and relevant disasters which had occurred in the past) than costs (i.e., the UHI and the future threats resulting from development). The STSP’s spatial development strategy, underpinned by the neoliberal approach with an agenda for maximising economic growth, was questionable for environmental management toward resilience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Architectural and Urban Design)
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Open AccessArticle Exploring Psychological and Aesthetic Approaches of Bio-Retention Facilities in the Urban Open Space
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2067; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9112067
Received: 9 September 2017 / Revised: 27 October 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 10 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1200 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Over the last decades, a number of bio-retention facilities have been installed in urban areas for flood control and green amenity purposes. As urban amenity facilities for citizens, bio-retentions have a lot potential; however, the literature on bio-retentions focused mostly on physiochemical aspects
[...] Read more.
Over the last decades, a number of bio-retention facilities have been installed in urban areas for flood control and green amenity purposes. As urban amenity facilities for citizens, bio-retentions have a lot potential; however, the literature on bio-retentions focused mostly on physiochemical aspects like water quality and runoffs. Hence, this paper aims to explore psychological aspects of bio-retentions such as perceptions and landscape aesthetic value for visitors. In order to achieve this purpose, the study employed on-site interviews and questionnaires in the chosen three case studies as research methodology. For the 3 different locations of bio-retention facilities, interviews and questionnaires were carried out. The surveys of 100 bio-retention users were conducted, investigating their general perceptions and landscape aesthetics of the bio-retention facilities. The paper found that only 34% of the interviewees recognised bio-detention facilities, illustrating that most visitors were not aware of such facilities and were unable to distinguish the differences between bio-retention and conventional gardens. On the other hand, the majority of interviewees strongly supported the concept and function of bio-retentions, especially those who recognised the differences in planting species with conventional urban open spaces. Such main findings also encourage further studies of seeking quantitative values by conducting a correlation analysis between the functions and aesthetics of bio-retention facilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Architectural and Urban Design)
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Open AccessArticle The Seasonal and Diurnal Influence of Surrounding Land Use on Temperature: Findings from Seoul, South Korea
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1443; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9081443
Received: 6 June 2017 / Revised: 11 August 2017 / Accepted: 11 August 2017 / Published: 16 August 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2633 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is a growing interest in understanding how the built environment affects temperature in cities. This study explores the impact of land use on temperature and how it varies by season and time of day in Seoul, South Korea. Unlike other studies that
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There is a growing interest in understanding how the built environment affects temperature in cities. This study explores the impact of land use on temperature and how it varies by season and time of day in Seoul, South Korea. Unlike other studies that rely on extracted data from remotely sensed information, this study uses land use data from local GIS and near-ground temperature data from a network of state-run weather stations. To deal with multicollinearity among the land use variables, partial least squares regression models were used for analysis. Results suggest that residential and commercial uses and roads increase the temperature while open spaces decrease it. In detail, central commercial use, high-density residential use, and roads were influential heaters, while greenery was an influential cooler throughout the year. This study suggests the need for place-based planning and design solutions that help build climate resilience of cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Architectural and Urban Design)
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