E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Sustainable Supply Chain System Design and Optimization"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Nidhal Rezg

Laboratory of Industrial Engineering, Production and Maintenance (LGIPM), France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: manufacturing/remanufacturing; maintenance/production; simulation; discrete event system theory
Guest Editor
Dr. Sadok Turki

Laboratory of Industrial Engineering, Production and Maintenance (LGIPM), France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainable supply chain systems; optimization methods and operations research; production and maintenance planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the increasing environmental preoccupation, potential economic benefits and legislation pressure, supply chain management has changed to focus on environmental impacts of production and Earth resource preservation. Consequently, today, many managers are working hard on improving the sustainability in their supply chain systems. Within the past decade, sustainable supply chain systems have drawn the attention of academia and manufacturers due to their great performance in raising profits and improving ecology. The research works consider costs, tax laws, material availability and resources. Thus, more attention is needed to optimize the sustainable supply chain systems, from the system design, raw material/end-of-life product management, production planning, transport and delivering, customer service, maintenance of the equipment, inventory management, coordination between the operations, etc.

From this point of view, authors are invited to submit high-quality research papers pertaining to design, analyzing, controlling, and optimizing the sustainable supply chain systems. Research related to the keyword below is welcomed.

Prof. Nidhal Rezg
Dr. Sadok Turki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optimization of sustainable supply chain systems
  • Sustainable logistics systems design
  • Sustainability in manufacturing/remanufacturing systems
  • Reverse logistics and closed loop supply chain
  • Production planning in a green supply chain
  • Green maintenance
  • Sustainable transport and delivering
  • Risk management for sustainable supply chain
  • Carbon footprint and carbon trading

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Triple Recycling Channel Strategies for Remanufacturing of Construction Machinery in a Retailer-Dominated Closed-Loop Supply Chain
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2167; doi:10.3390/su9122167
Received: 11 October 2017 / Revised: 18 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 1 December 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1693 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Firms engaged in remanufacturing activities generally adopt more than one recycling channel to collect more used products and gain more profits. This paper explores the optimal strategies for a retailer-dominated closed-loop supply chain (CLSC) with a triple recycling channel in the construction machinery
[...] Read more.
Firms engaged in remanufacturing activities generally adopt more than one recycling channel to collect more used products and gain more profits. This paper explores the optimal strategies for a retailer-dominated closed-loop supply chain (CLSC) with a triple recycling channel in the construction machinery remanufacturing context. In this special system, the retailer is the leader and authorized by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) to remanufacture. Moreover, the OEM, the retailer, and the secondary market all take part in the used products collection activities. Considering the differentiation of the OEM, the retailer, and the secondary market in collecting the used construction machinery, a mathematical model of the CLSC system based on reasonable assumptions is built, the closed-form optimal pricing decisions are derived, and the optimal collection efforts allocation strategies are explored within the framework of the game theory. In addition, the impacts of the reverse logistics cost coefficient, the competing coefficient, and the buy-back price coefficient on the supply chain performance are elaborately analyzed. These achievements provide decision makers with managerial insights and offer efficient guidelines for the construction machinery remanufacturing firms to solve similar puzzles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Supply Chain System Design and Optimization)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Dual-Recycling Channel Decision in a Closed-Loop Supply Chain with Cost Disruptions
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2004; doi:10.3390/su9112004
Received: 11 October 2017 / Revised: 29 October 2017 / Accepted: 31 October 2017 / Published: 3 November 2017
PDF Full-text (2822 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper investigates cost disruptions of new and remanufactured products in a closed-loop supply chain where a manufacturer and a third-party collector recycle used products through online-recycling and offline-recycling channels, respectively. We use a Stackelberg game to acquire the equilibrium decisions of dual-recycling
[...] Read more.
This paper investigates cost disruptions of new and remanufactured products in a closed-loop supply chain where a manufacturer and a third-party collector recycle used products through online-recycling and offline-recycling channels, respectively. We use a Stackelberg game to acquire the equilibrium decisions of dual-recycling and single-recycling channels and analyze how cost disruptions affect the manufacturer’ production and collection strategies. We show that, cost disruption of new products produces a positive impact whilst the remanufacturing cost disruption has a negative impact on collection quantity of used products and negative cost disruptions of both new and remanufactured products could be profitable to the manufacturer. As for the manufacturer’s channel choice, the dual-recycling channel dominates single-recycling channels when new product cost faces positive disruption, because the manufacturer acts as both a buyer and a competitor to the collector and can determine an appropriate acquisition price and transfer price to coordinate the online-offline recycling channel. While if cost disruption of new products is negative, the manufacturer prefers the dual-recycling channel instead of single-recycling channels only if the remanufacturing cost faces large size of negative disruption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Supply Chain System Design and Optimization)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top