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Special Issue "New Economics for the Anthropocene"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Scott Kelly

Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, Level 11, UTS Building 10, 235 Jones Street, Ultimo NSW 2007, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61-2-9514-4881
Interests: new economics; sustainable finance; sustainable development; systems thinking; energy systems modelling; climate change economics; complexity science
Guest Editor
Prof. Robert Costanza

Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University, College of Asia and the Pacific. 132 Lennox Crossing, Acton ACT 0200, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: transdisciplinary integration; systems ecology; ecological economics; landscape ecology; ecological modelling; ecological design; energy analysis; environmental policy; social traps; incentive structures and institutions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are entering a period of emerging cultural transition driven by major changes in the Earth System—changes we have forged collectively yet which remain beyond any individual’s control. The term “Anthropocene Transition” names the beginning of this transformation in the human-Earth relationship.

In response to increasing systemic turbulence, communities, organisations and regions around the world are experimenting with new approaches to production, consumption, distribution and exchange. An increasingly mechanised workforce brings challenges as well as opportunities for the future of work that is both valued and meaningful. Innovations that support peer-to-peer exchange and sharing economies are growing in prominence across the globe. Alternative digital currencies are displacing national currencies and blockchain technologies promise to fundamentally change key institutions. Grassroots movements are also taking hold, from community supported agriculture schemes like Food Connect, the global Transition Towns movement, the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies in the USA, universal basic income trials in Finland, Kenya, Canada and elsewhere, and countless community-based energy projects. Alternative tax systems, new green investment models and innovative financial instruments (e.g., green bonds) have the potential to make a significant impact on the transition to a sustainable economy.

This special issue is calling for papers that deal with both the theoretical and practical considerations of creating a new economy for the Anthropocene. An economy focused on sustainable wellbeing rather than endless, inequitable growth.

Dr. Scott Kelly
Prof. Robert Costanza
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • new economics;

  • sustainability;

  • post-growth;

  • steady state economics;

  • anthropocene;

  • limits to growth;

  • ecological economics;

  • wellbeing economics;

  • donut economics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle What Is Natural about Natural Capital during the Anthropocene?
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 806; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030806
Received: 23 February 2018 / Revised: 9 March 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 14 March 2018
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Abstract
The concept of natural capital denotes a rich variety of natural processes, such as ecosystems, that produce economically valuable goods and services. The Anthropocene signals a diminished state of nature, however, with some scholars claiming that no part of the Earth’s surface remains
[...] Read more.
The concept of natural capital denotes a rich variety of natural processes, such as ecosystems, that produce economically valuable goods and services. The Anthropocene signals a diminished state of nature, however, with some scholars claiming that no part of the Earth’s surface remains untouched. What are ecological economists to make of natural capital during the Anthropocene? Is natural capital still a coherent concept? What is the conceptual relationship between nature and natural capital? This article wrestles with John Stuart Mill’s two concepts of nature and argues that during the Anthropocene, natural capital should be understood as denoting economically valuable processes that are not absolutely—but relatively—detached from intentional human agency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Economics for the Anthropocene)
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Open AccessArticle Sustainable Development, Wellbeing and Material Consumption: A Stoic Perspective
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 474; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020474
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 30 January 2018 / Accepted: 7 February 2018 / Published: 10 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1734 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since the introduction of neoclassical economic theory, material wealth and accumulation have been linked to hedonic wellbeing. In turn, Utilitarian notions have generated the belief that infinite growth is not only good but necessary for society to prosper. Unsurprisingly, this belief system has
[...] Read more.
Since the introduction of neoclassical economic theory, material wealth and accumulation have been linked to hedonic wellbeing. In turn, Utilitarian notions have generated the belief that infinite growth is not only good but necessary for society to prosper. Unsurprisingly, this belief system has supported the considerable depletion of natural resources and has not always led to social equitability or environmental justice, two pillars of sustainable development. Given these limitations, this paper looks into eudaimonic wellbeing, as defined by Stoicism. The latter originating in Classical Greece and Ancient Rome, has been used throughout the centuries to discuss and support the flourishing of individuals, but has rarely been applied to collective wellbeing. Consequently, we explore whether, and to what extent, this virtue-based philosophy can answer questions regarding the value and the role of material acquisition in societal development, as directed by sustainable policy. We propose the idea that the Stoic emphasis on prudence, self-control, courage and justice, as the only means to achieve “happiness”, is intrinsically linked to sustainable wellbeing and that its principles can be used to demonstrate that society does not require limitless growth to flourish. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Economics for the Anthropocene)
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