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Special Issue "Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability of Culture and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Heather Mair

Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: leisure, tourism and sport policy development; food and leisure; the politics of tourism and rural development; leisure, tourism, sport and community development; critical and qualitative inquiry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Any exploration of the relationship between leisure and the various facets of sustainability must underscore its complexity. Indeed, activities related to leisure, tourism, and sport can be understood as both undermining sustainability (e.g., the impact of long-haul airline flights on climate change) while also offering opportunities for fostering change to enhance sustainability (e.g., leisure-related social movements can focus on environmental consciousness-raising). Further, investigations of the role of leisure, sport and tourism in community development illuminate how communities can be built and sustained through leisure (e.g., community gardens can generate social capital) but also the ways in which communities can be destabilised or exclusionary (e.g., fees for community sport programs can limit participation). Efforts to situate our understanding of how leisure, tourism and sport affect community development within the broader context of sustainability, then, must be willing to embrace and navigate these complexities. This Special Issue aims to link broad understandings of sustainability and community development through a direct engagement with topics related to leisure, tourism and sport. Authors are invited to contribute to this issue by submitting conceptual or research articles that engage these tensions and complexities. Papers selected for this Special Issue are subject to a rigorous peer review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Prof. Dr. Heather Mair
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Community-based approaches to tourism, sport and leisure programs or development
  • Impacts of tourism, sport and/or leisure on sustainability and community
  • Sustainable communities
  • Critical perspectives on sustainability
  • Critical perspectives on tourism, sport and leisure in the context of community development

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Sport for Development and Peace and the Environment: The Case for Policy, Practice, and Research
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2241; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072241
Received: 6 June 2018 / Revised: 19 June 2018 / Accepted: 20 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
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Abstract
This paper highlights the need for critical attention and reflection within the Sport for Development and Peace (SDP) sector regarding the physical environment. Drawing on fieldwork that examined a variety of SDP initiatives in five different countries, we argue that instrumental concerns at
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This paper highlights the need for critical attention and reflection within the Sport for Development and Peace (SDP) sector regarding the physical environment. Drawing on fieldwork that examined a variety of SDP initiatives in five different countries, we argue that instrumental concerns at local levels often mean that the physical environment takes a back seat to other development priorities within SDP activity. This is despite the critical importance of issues, such as environmental degradation and the threats posed by climate change, as well as the fact that sport is directly linked to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals and the 2030 Agenda. After providing examples of the relegation of the physical environment in different SDP contexts, we put forth three conceptual frameworks that would be useful within SDP scholarship for advancing critical discussion on this issue within the sector. The final section discusses both the implications of these initial findings and suggests questions and topics for future research around this timely issue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)
Open AccessArticle Employee Fitness Programs: Exploring Relationships between Perceived Organizational Support toward Employee Fitness and Organizational Sustainability Performance
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 1930; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061930
Received: 2 April 2018 / Revised: 1 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 8 June 2018
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Abstract
This study investigates the influence of employee fitness programs on organizational sustainability performance from the perspective of organizational support as perceived by employees. Organizational sustainability performance was specified as a second-order factor, which was affected by three first-order factors: financial performance, social performance,
[...] Read more.
This study investigates the influence of employee fitness programs on organizational sustainability performance from the perspective of organizational support as perceived by employees. Organizational sustainability performance was specified as a second-order factor, which was affected by three first-order factors: financial performance, social performance, and environmental performance. A snowball sampling method was employed to conduct an online survey of working adults in Shanghai to test the proposed hypotheses. Results show that perceived organizational support toward employee fitness has a positive and significant effect on organizational sustainability performance, and the positive effect is mediated by job satisfaction and organizational commitment. This study also provides theoretical and managerial implications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)
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Open AccessArticle Sport Involvement Analysis in Hungary, in the North Great Plain Region
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1629; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051629
Received: 1 April 2018 / Revised: 9 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 18 May 2018
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Abstract
On a global level, a healthy lifestyle is experienced more where sport and physical activity as a way of life has gained more importance. European Union documents (such as the White Paper on Sport—2007) further stressed the important role of physical activity, and
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On a global level, a healthy lifestyle is experienced more where sport and physical activity as a way of life has gained more importance. European Union documents (such as the White Paper on Sport—2007) further stressed the important role of physical activity, and member states have declared the same opinion. Almost all scientific research approaches the topic by measuring the sport-related activity rate and incidence. The findings of Eurobarometer (2014) revealed that 41% of responding European citizens pursue some kinds of sport or do some form of body movement once a week, while 59% rarely or never do. In Hungary, compared to the findings of 2009, activity improved. Still, 44% of Hungarian citizens never undertake any sports activity. Pursuing sport and showing interests in a more active lifestyle are indicators that may truly reflect the social connection between sport and the society itself, and we may apply both terms in the framework of engagement. These terms lead us to the topic of sport related involvement, including social, psychological, and economic dimensions. In a large sample representative survey, carried out among Hungarian people in the North Great plain region, we aimed to reveal the specifications of sport engagement and our empirical findings have proved a very strong connection between sport and the population itself. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)
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Open AccessArticle Analyzing the Coopetition between Tourism and Leisure Suppliers—A Case Study of the Leisure Card Tirol
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1447; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051447
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 25 April 2018 / Accepted: 2 May 2018 / Published: 7 May 2018
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Abstract
Even though coopetition in the context of tourism is not new, research lacks concrete examples within the leisure business and about its effects on local communities. Hence, this study investigates a super-regional alliance of tourism and leisure suppliers as well as its effects
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Even though coopetition in the context of tourism is not new, research lacks concrete examples within the leisure business and about its effects on local communities. Hence, this study investigates a super-regional alliance of tourism and leisure suppliers as well as its effects on the community in the region of Tyrol, Austria. In the framework of 60 guided interviews, all organizations engaged in the Leisure Card Tirol (LCT) were contacted and questioned. The analysis of the qualitative data shows the motives for joining the alliance are either economic or non-economic in nature, and thus the alliance is evaluated differently by the various suppliers. Several corporations including swimming pools, ice skating rinks, museums, a football stadium (limited access), and mountain railway companies attract more locals to consume leisure (a partly merit good) due to their membership in the LCT alliance. However, the suppliers’ heterogeneity in respect of their management (governmental, private, and mixed forms) is suggested to be the reason behind the LCT’s financial survival. In summary, intentional coopetition in the context of a super-regional year-around pass may be a sustainable model of increasing a local community’s welfare by providing affordable leisure activities, although some minor and major issues on the part of the suppliers might occur. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)
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Open AccessArticle Korean Golf Tourism in China: Place, Perception and Narratives
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1055; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041055
Received: 12 March 2018 / Revised: 29 March 2018 / Accepted: 30 March 2018 / Published: 3 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2181 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tourism is a critical, cross-cultural social behavior in contemporary society and provides diverse experiences based on different regional resources in destinations. This research identified the attributes associated with Korean golf tourists’ images of seven destination regions in Mainland China. A content analysis of
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Tourism is a critical, cross-cultural social behavior in contemporary society and provides diverse experiences based on different regional resources in destinations. This research identified the attributes associated with Korean golf tourists’ images of seven destination regions in Mainland China. A content analysis of 328 golf tourists’ blogs indicated that each region had different combinations of destination attributes, but these were partially hidden in vivid descriptions of playing experiences. The narratives were coded with 15 golf destination attributes with 136 headwords and they reflected both place-centred images and interactions through perceptual experiences with different social groups. The golfers greatly appreciated congestion control at courses and social interaction during their tours, including the services of local human resources and play partners. The seven Chinese golf destinations had different perceived characteristics and relationships with South Korean society. Thus, they had dissimilar destination images for Korean golf tourists. Historical ties and geographical proximity played important roles, including, for example, the significant presence of ethnic Koreans in northeast China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)
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Open AccessArticle The Impact of the 2010 Women’s Rugby World Cup on Sustained Volunteering in the Rugby Community
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1030; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041030
Received: 19 March 2018 / Revised: 19 March 2018 / Accepted: 28 March 2018 / Published: 30 March 2018
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Abstract
Major sport events increasingly rely on volunteers to sustain their operations. Thus, event organisers are concerned with the task of identifying volunteers and utilising appropriate strategies to retain them. The purpose of the study is to explore the potential of harnessing volunteer activity
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Major sport events increasingly rely on volunteers to sustain their operations. Thus, event organisers are concerned with the task of identifying volunteers and utilising appropriate strategies to retain them. The purpose of the study is to explore the potential of harnessing volunteer activity in different contexts, as a result of previous single-sport event experience, and to determine which factors influence future volunteering decisions. Data that was related to volunteers’ profile, motivations, satisfaction, and future volunteer intentions was gathered through an online survey on 70 volunteers of the 2010 Women’s Rugby World Cup. Factor analysis was employed to summarise volunteers’ motivations and satisfaction with their experience. Regression analysis was then applied to identify which of these factors, for example, which motivations, aspects of satisfaction with the experience, socio-demographic characteristics, and previous sport engagement determine future intentions to volunteer in similar events or in sport clubs. The implications of the findings for event organisers are then discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)
Open AccessArticle The Relationships among Leisure Involvement, Organizational Commitment and Well-Being: Viewpoints from Sport Fans in Asia
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 740; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030740
Received: 18 February 2018 / Revised: 27 February 2018 / Accepted: 28 February 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1371 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Baseball spectating is one of the most popular leisure activities in Asia. Leisure participants with high well-being levels usually demonstrate loyal behavior to the teams they follow. Previous research indicates that professional sport fans are serious leisure participants and their participation has career
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Baseball spectating is one of the most popular leisure activities in Asia. Leisure participants with high well-being levels usually demonstrate loyal behavior to the teams they follow. Previous research indicates that professional sport fans are serious leisure participants and their participation has career qualities. The goal of this research was to investigate the relationship of leisure involvement with the well-being of professional sport fans and the possible mediating effect of organizational commitment, a career-related characteristic, on well-being. Some 406 fans of the Brother Elephants Baseball Team in Taiwan were surveyed. The results showed that leisure involvement positively and significantly influenced fans’ well-being and organizational commitment partially mediated the influence of leisure involvement on well-being. This study pioneers the integration of leisure involvement, well-being and organizational commitment in the context of a Professional Baseball League team within Asia. Implications and future research directions are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)
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Open AccessArticle Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Spectators’ Transportation in Collegiate Sporting Events: Comparing On-Campus and Off-Campus Stadium Locations
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010241
Received: 9 November 2017 / Revised: 6 January 2018 / Accepted: 12 January 2018 / Published: 18 January 2018
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Abstract
Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions related to spectator’s transportation to collegiate football events is a significant consideration in the overall carbon footprint of collegiate sporting events. Transportation mode affects CO2 emissions per spectator and stadium location, specifically on- and off-campus locations
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Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions related to spectator’s transportation to collegiate football events is a significant consideration in the overall carbon footprint of collegiate sporting events. Transportation mode affects CO2 emissions per spectator and stadium location, specifically on- and off-campus locations affect the transportation mode chosen by spectators. The quantity of CO2 emissions generated from spectators’ transportation to collegiate sporting events at an on-campus university stadium is compared to off-campus stadium. The transportation modes and miles traveled by spectators were modeled with GREET 2016 to estimate CO2 emissions. Significant differences were found between the two stadium locations regarding the spectators’ choice of transportation mode and distance traveled. Implications are presented for environmental sustainability and planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Exploring Critical Alternatives for Youth Development through Lifestyle Sport: Surfing and Community Development in Aotearoa/New Zealand
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2298; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9122298
Received: 16 November 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 5 December 2017 / Published: 11 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (239 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While competition-based team sports remain dominant in community and sport-for-development programs, researchers are exploring the value of alternative, less “sportized” activities such as lifestyle/action sports. In this paper, we explore the ways in which surfing is being used in development programs in Aotearoa/New
[...] Read more.
While competition-based team sports remain dominant in community and sport-for-development programs, researchers are exploring the value of alternative, less “sportized” activities such as lifestyle/action sports. In this paper, we explore the ways in which surfing is being used in development programs in Aotearoa/New Zealand, examining the perceived social benefits and impact. Our methods involved: (a) mapping the range of surfing projects; and (b) 8 in-depth interviews with program personnel. Widespread conviction in the positive developmental benefits of surfing was evident, and that surfing had a “special” capacity to reform or heal those who participate in it. However, the ways in which individuals’ self-developments were promoted appear to be following the traditional sport/youth development path. They focus on policies aimed at improved life chances, equipping youth with the tools for self-improvement and self-management, inculcating self-governance and self-reliance. However, a counter narrative co-existed, highlighting surfing as a freeing experience, which, rather than restoring social order, works to instigate a personal transformation or awakening. Despite the range of challenges presented by surfing as a tool for positive development, surfing presents a potentially “critical alternative” which if sport-for-development programs are to be a form of social change, we should remain open to exploring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)

Other

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Open AccessConcept Paper Eating Our Way to Sustainability? Leisure, Food and Community Economic Development
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1422; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051422
Received: 24 March 2018 / Revised: 25 April 2018 / Accepted: 2 May 2018 / Published: 4 May 2018
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Abstract
This article reviews and synthesizes critical literature in the areas of food, leisure, sustainability and community economic development to answer the question of whether we can eat our way to sustainability. It begins with the work of John Loxley and his approach to
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This article reviews and synthesizes critical literature in the areas of food, leisure, sustainability and community economic development to answer the question of whether we can eat our way to sustainability. It begins with the work of John Loxley and his approach to community economic development, by emphasizing linkages, leakages and leveraging. It then turns to the imprecise concept of sustainability and gives it a more precise meaning, linking it with McMurtry’s idea of the civil commons. The article goes on to apply this new meaning to three important terms: sustainable leisure, sustainable communities and sustainable community economic development. With these understandings in place, it then examines four examples of using leisure activities in the realm of food to support sustainable community economic development: community gardens, community-supported agriculture, gleaning and community kitchens. The article concludes that we can indeed eat our way to sustainability if we choose food-related leisure activities that enable others to eat as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leisure, Tourism, Sport and Community Development)
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