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Special Issue "Green Logistics"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Russell G Thompson

Department of Infrastructure Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: city logistics; sustainable urban freight systems; intelligent transport systems
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Benjamin T. Hazen

1. Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
2. Department of Operational Sciences, Air Force Institute of Technology, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: closed-loop supply chains; reverse logistics; innovation; supply chain information systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Logistics refers to the forward and reverse flow of goods, services, and related information between points of interest. Considering the rapidly expanding global population and economy, logistics represents a key area that governments, businesses and the general population can improve upon to enhance environmental sustainability. Whether it is a company doing business offshore and requires raw materials or finished goods to be transported across continents, or a government looking to incentivize behavior, implications of green logistics practices are far reaching. Globalisation, e-commerce, aging population and urbanisation present real challenges for improving the sustainability of logistics systems. New approaches are required for reducing the negative impacts of production, storage, consumption and distribution of goods.

This Special Issue on Green Logistics will address this vast, emerging area by emphasising more environmentally sustainable ways to transport, store, and distribute goods, services, people and information. Any research the covers a topic encompassed by the keywords below is welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Russell G. Thompson
Prof. Dr. Benjamin T. Hazen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • green logistics
  • reverse logistics
  • green transportation
  • green warehousing and distribution
  • sustainable urban development
  • closed-loop supply chains
  • city logistics
  • green passenger transportation
  • green urban freight
  • collaborative consumption in logistics and transportation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Low-Carbon Warehousing: Examining Impacts of Building and Intra-Logistics Design Options on Energy Demand and the CO2 Emissions of Logistics Centers
Sustainability 2016, 8(5), 448; doi:10.3390/su8050448
Received: 15 February 2016 / Revised: 27 April 2016 / Accepted: 29 April 2016 / Published: 6 May 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6398 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Logistics centers contribute to CO2 emissions in the building and logistics sector and therefore share a responsibility to decarbonize not only the supply chain. Synergy effects in both building and intra-logistics should be considered as suitable levers to lower energy demand and
[...] Read more.
Logistics centers contribute to CO2 emissions in the building and logistics sector and therefore share a responsibility to decarbonize not only the supply chain. Synergy effects in both building and intra-logistics should be considered as suitable levers to lower energy demand and related CO2 emissions. This research develops firs t with a systemic approach an integrated analytical model for energy calculation and reference building models for different types of logistics centers to provide basic knowledge and a methodological framework for planners and managers to aid in the selection of different intra-logistics and building design options for optimum energy efficiency. It then determines the energy demand in reference building models and performs parameter studies to examine interrelations and impacts of design options for intra-logistics, building technology, and building skin on energy demand. It combines these to optimized reference building models to show the extent to which energy and CO2 emission savings can be reached. The results show that it is possible to significantly lower CO2 emissions. However, there are clear differences between the different types of logistics centers and the impacts of different design options. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Logistics)
Figures

Open AccessArticle To Green or Not to Green: A Political, Economic and Social Analysis for the Past Failure of Green Logistics
Sustainability 2016, 8(5), 441; doi:10.3390/su8050441
Received: 13 February 2016 / Revised: 20 April 2016 / Accepted: 26 April 2016 / Published: 4 May 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2590 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of green logistics has thus far failed. For example, the share of greenhouse gas emissions by the transportation and logistics sector in Europe rose from 16.6% in 1990 to 24.3% in 2012. This article analyzes the reasons behind this failure by
[...] Read more.
The objective of green logistics has thus far failed. For example, the share of greenhouse gas emissions by the transportation and logistics sector in Europe rose from 16.6% in 1990 to 24.3% in 2012. This article analyzes the reasons behind this failure by drawing on political, economic and business as well as social motivations and examples. At the core of this analysis are the established theorems of the Jevons paradox and the median voter (Black, Downs) in combination with time-distorted preferences of voters and consumers. Adding to the hurdles of green logistics are the problems of short-term political programs and decisions versus long-term business investments in transportation and logistics. Two cases from Germany are outlined regarding this political “meddling through” with a recent 2015 truck toll decision and the support for electric trucks and vehicles. Finally, the article proposes two ways forward: public control and restriction of carbon raw materials (coal, oil), as well as public investment in low-emission transport infrastructure or biofuels as the more feasible and likely alternative. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Logistics)
Open AccessArticle Urban Freight Transport Planning towards Green Goals: Synthetic Environmental Evidence from Tested Results
Sustainability 2016, 8(4), 381; doi:10.3390/su8040381
Received: 15 February 2016 / Revised: 3 April 2016 / Accepted: 6 April 2016 / Published: 19 April 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1475 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reviews the ex-post assessment of city logistics measures implemented in some European cities and, in a “what if” framework, proposes an analysis of tested environmental effects which may be useful in defining city logistics scenarios to be evaluated ex ante by
[...] Read more.
This paper reviews the ex-post assessment of city logistics measures implemented in some European cities and, in a “what if” framework, proposes an analysis of tested environmental effects which may be useful in defining city logistics scenarios to be evaluated ex ante by simulation models. The analysis is performed in relation to the goals of environmental sustainability to pursue and the main characteristics of the cities in question (i.e., population and density). The paper aims to provide a tool that could be used in an ex-ante assessment methodology to identify a priori which measures (or set of measures) could best work in a specific city with respect to the environmental sustainability goals to pursue. Future scenarios can, thus, be readily defined and subsequently assessed by simulation tools in order to verify whether they meet the planned objectives. Although all measures can produce considerable environmental effects, the study shows that the choice of their implementation should be driven by the type of pollutant to detect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Logistics)
Open AccessArticle Green Transport Balanced Scorecard Model with Analytic Network Process Support
Sustainability 2015, 7(11), 15243-15261; doi:10.3390/su71115243
Received: 8 September 2015 / Revised: 5 November 2015 / Accepted: 6 November 2015 / Published: 18 November 2015
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1056 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent decades, the performance of economic and non-economic activities has required them to be friendly with the environment. Transport is one of the areas having considerable potential within the scope. The main assumption to achieve ambitious green goals is an effective green
[...] Read more.
In recent decades, the performance of economic and non-economic activities has required them to be friendly with the environment. Transport is one of the areas having considerable potential within the scope. The main assumption to achieve ambitious green goals is an effective green transport evaluation system. However, these systems are researched from the industrial company and supply chain perspective only sporadically. The aim of the paper is to design a conceptual framework for creating the Green Transport (GT) Balanced Scorecard (BSC) models from the viewpoint of industrial companies and supply chains using an appropriate multi-criteria decision making method. The models should allow green transport performance evaluation and support of an effective implementation of green transport strategies. Since performance measures used in Balanced Scorecard models are interdependent, the Analytic Network Process (ANP) was used as the appropriate multi-criteria decision making method. The verification of the designed conceptual framework was performed on a real supply chain of the European automotive industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Logistics)
Open AccessArticle Predicting Public Bicycle Adoption Using the Technology Acceptance Model
Sustainability 2015, 7(11), 14558-14573; doi:10.3390/su71114558
Received: 8 September 2015 / Revised: 23 October 2015 / Accepted: 26 October 2015 / Published: 30 October 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (840 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bicycle sharing programs provide a sustainable mode of urban transportation. Although cities across the globe have developed these systems for their citizens and visitors, usage rates are not as high as anticipated. This research uses the technology acceptance model as the basis to
[...] Read more.
Bicycle sharing programs provide a sustainable mode of urban transportation. Although cities across the globe have developed these systems for their citizens and visitors, usage rates are not as high as anticipated. This research uses the technology acceptance model as the basis to understand one’s intention to adopt bicycle sharing programs. Using survey data derived from 421 participants in Beijing, China, the proposed covariance-based structural equation model consisting of perceived quality, perceived convenience, and perceived value is found to predict 50.5% of the variance in adoption intention. The findings of this research contribute to theory and practice in the burgeoning literature on public bicycle systems and sustainable urban transportation by offering a theoretical lens through which to consider system adoption, and providing information to practitioners as to what factors might contribute most to adoption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Logistics)

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