E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Impacts of Climate Change on Hydrology, Water Quality and Ecology"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Eun-Sung Chung

Department of Civil Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, South Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: climate change impacts and adaptation hydrological modelling; integrated water resources management; multi-criteria decision making; sustainability; urban drainage modelling; water resources index; water resources system engineering
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jiping Jiang

School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
E-Mail
Interests: water quality modelling; environmental system analysis; environmental informatics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In most countries, global warming or climate change has become an inevitable reality because we have suffered from tremendous serious disasters (e.g., flood, drought, groundwater depletion, water quality deterioration, ecological disturbance, etc.) resulted from inoccasionally-extreme meteorological events. Despite global efforts on the mitigation and adaptation of climate change impacts, all social, economic, environmental and ecological damages have been increasing, even in recent years. Before the implementation of any adaptive measures, it is definitely required to analyze the quantitative impacts of climate change on hydrology, water quality and ecology in both global and regional scales, as well as to precisely forecast the future climate conditions. Thus, the careful scrutiny on climate change impact can result in the selection of effective mitigation and adaptation measures.

This Special Issue will show the state-of-the-art techniques and various global applications for the impacts of climate change on flood, drought, groundwater vulnerability, water quality and ecology in a global and regional scales based on historical climate data and various climate change scenarios. Although, there have been plenty of articles on this theme for the past several decades, it should be continuously studied due to its importance. Furthermore, comprehensive review on this issue can be very helpful to all interested researchers in the world.

Now, we invite any researchers to contribute your recent research manuscripts, as well as review articles.

Prof. Dr. Eun-Sung Chung
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • climate change scenarios
  • drought
  • ecology
  • flood
  • sustainability
  • groundwater vulnerability
  • water quality

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle How Do Terrestrial Determinants Impact the Response of Water Quality to Climate Drivers?—An Elasticity Perspective on the Water–Land–Climate Nexus
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2118; doi:10.3390/su9112118
Received: 16 September 2017 / Revised: 7 November 2017 / Accepted: 15 November 2017 / Published: 17 November 2017
PDF Full-text (2456 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Investigating water–land–climate interactions is critical for urban development and watershed management. This study examined this nexus by elasticity and statistical approaches through the lens of three watersheds: The Yukon, Mekong and Murray. Here, this study reports the fundamental characteristics, explanations and ecological and
[...] Read more.
Investigating water–land–climate interactions is critical for urban development and watershed management. This study examined this nexus by elasticity and statistical approaches through the lens of three watersheds: The Yukon, Mekong and Murray. Here, this study reports the fundamental characteristics, explanations and ecological and management implications of terrestrial determinant influence on the response of water quality to climate drivers. The stability of the response, measured by climate elasticity of water quality (CEWQ), is highly dependent on terrestrial determinants, with strong impacts from anthropogenic biomes and low impacts from surficial geology. Compared to temperature elasticity, precipitation elasticity of water quality is more unstable due to its possible linkages with many terrestrial determinants. Correlation and linear models were developed for the interaction system, which uncovered many interesting scenarios. The results implied that watersheds with a higher ratio of rangeland biomes have a lower risk of instability as compared to watersheds with a higher proportion of dense settlement, cropland and forested biomes. This study discusses some of the most essential pathways where instability might adversely affect CEWQ parameters and recommends suggestions for policy makers to alleviate the instability impacts to bring sustainability to the water environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Climate Change on Hydrology, Water Quality and Ecology)
Figures

Back to Top