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Special Issue "Eutrophication and Sustainable Management of Water"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Marco Ragazzi

Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, Trento I-38123, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Management, treatment and recovery of municipal waste, sewage sludge and biomass waste collection, aerobic and anaerobic treatment, heat treatment; Management and Waste Water Treatment; Remediation of contaminated sites; Air pollution and health risk: indoor and outdoor; Eutrophication of lakes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on eutrophication with the aim of presenting this phenomenon through an integrated vision that may come both from specialized and from interdisciplinary articles. Received papers are expected to cover a wide range of topics: From the sustainable management of catchment basins of lakes (prevention) to the analysis of the suitability of in-lake solutions for the water body recovery (treatment), from the detailed study of algal species to understand the evolution of eutrophication to the study of the sediments of lakes. Of course, the sustainable management of water bodies will be not limited to lakes: Coastal areas of seas, lagoons, reservoirs will be dealt with the same attention. Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a peer review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of their contents.

Prof. Marco Ragazzi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eutrophication
  • algae
  • sediment
  • lake
  • sea
  • lagoon
  • nutrients
  • reservoir
  • recovery
  • management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Employing SWOT Analysis and Normal Cloud Model for Water Resource Sustainable Utilization Assessment and Strategy Development
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1439; doi:10.3390/su9081439
Received: 3 July 2017 / Revised: 27 July 2017 / Accepted: 13 August 2017 / Published: 15 August 2017
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Abstract
Water Resource Sustainable Utilization (WRSU) is becoming increasingly important, given growing water resource shortages and widening gaps between water supply and demand. Most existing studies have focused on WRSU levels without a dedicated strategy-oriented framework. In addition, uncertainties occur in the process of
[...] Read more.
Water Resource Sustainable Utilization (WRSU) is becoming increasingly important, given growing water resource shortages and widening gaps between water supply and demand. Most existing studies have focused on WRSU levels without a dedicated strategy-oriented framework. In addition, uncertainties occur in the process of indicator quantification and grading, leading to a lack of accuracy in the assessment results. Therefore, in this study, stemming from water resource, societal, economic, and environmental dimensions, an indicator system with qualitative description was introduced by Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis to enable development and selection of sustainable water use strategies. A normal cloud model that is capable of addressing uncertainties was used to determine WRSU levels. The comprehensive evaluation results can both reflect the WRSU levels and select the most suitable strategy. The model’s utility was demonstrated by applying it to the case of Shandong province in China. Based on the results, most areas of Shandong province appear to be facing serious unsustainable issues. Appropriate development strategies based on the WRSU levels were provided for improving sustainable use of water resources. The proposed method offers an efficient means for WRSU assessment and strategy development. Moreover, it has the potential to be applied to other water resource issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eutrophication and Sustainable Management of Water)
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Open AccessArticle Impact of Population Growth on the Water Quality of Natural Water Bodies
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1405; doi:10.3390/su9081405
Received: 10 July 2017 / Revised: 3 August 2017 / Accepted: 4 August 2017 / Published: 9 August 2017
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Abstract
Human activities pose a significant threat to the water quality of rivers when pollution exceeds the threshold limit. Urban activities in particular are highlighted as one of the major causes of contamination in surface water bodies in Asian countries. Evaluation of sustainable human
[...] Read more.
Human activities pose a significant threat to the water quality of rivers when pollution exceeds the threshold limit. Urban activities in particular are highlighted as one of the major causes of contamination in surface water bodies in Asian countries. Evaluation of sustainable human population capacities in river watersheds is necessary to maintain better freshwater ecosystems in a country while achieving its development goals as a nation. We evaluated the correlation between the growth rate of the population in a watershed area and water quality parameters of a river ecosystem. The Kelani River in Sri Lanka was selected for the study. The highest correlation coefficients of 0.7, 0.69, 0.69 (p < 0.01) corresponding to biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), dissolved oxygen (DO) and total coliform (TC) were obtained with the population in watersheds of the Kelani river in Sri Lanka. Thus, we propose a quantitative approach to estimating the population capacity of watersheds based on water quality classification standards (WQCS), employing the Bayesian network (BN) classification model. The optimum population ranges were obtained from the probability distribution table of the population node in the BN. The results showed that the population density should be approximately less than 2375 to keep the water quality in the watershed for bathing and drinking purposes and approximately less than 2672 for fish and other aquatic organisms. This research will offer a means that can used to understand the impact of population on water quality in river basins and confer direct influence on natural water bodies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eutrophication and Sustainable Management of Water)
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Open AccessArticle The Impact of Vegetative Slope on Water Flow and Pollutant Transport through Embankments
Sustainability 2017, 9(7), 1128; doi:10.3390/su9071128
Received: 22 May 2017 / Revised: 25 June 2017 / Accepted: 26 June 2017 / Published: 27 June 2017
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Abstract
Embankments are common structures along rivers or lakes in riparian zones in plain areas. They should have natural slopes instead of slopes covered by concrete or other hard materials, in order to rebuild sustainable ecosystems for riparian zones. This study was conducted to
[...] Read more.
Embankments are common structures along rivers or lakes in riparian zones in plain areas. They should have natural slopes instead of slopes covered by concrete or other hard materials, in order to rebuild sustainable ecosystems for riparian zones. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of vegetative slopes on water flow and pollutant transport through the embankments. Three embankments with different slope treatments (a bare slope, a slope covered in centipede grass, a slope covered in tall fescue) were examined, and three inflow applications of pollute water with different concentration of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) used to simulate different agricultural non-point pollution levels. The results showed that the water flux rates of the three embankments were relatively stable under all inflow events, and almost all values were higher than 80%. The embankments with vegetative slopes had better nitrogen removal than the bare slope under all events, and the one with tall fescue slope was best, but the benefits of vegetative slopes decreased with increasing inflow concentration. Moreover, there were no significant differences between the embankments on phosphorus removal, for which the reductions were all high (above 90%) with most loads remaining in the front third of embankment bodies. Overall, the embankments with vegetative slopes had positive effects on water exchange and reducing non-point pollutant into lake or river water, which provides a quantitative scientific basis for the actual layout of lakeshores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eutrophication and Sustainable Management of Water)
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