E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Disasters, Crisis, Hazards, Emergencies and Sustainable Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Ziqiang Han

Institute for Disaster Management and Reconstruction, Sichuan University-The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: risk analysis and decision making; disaster recovery; disaster preparedness
Guest Editor
Dr. William L. Waugh

Andrew Young School of Policy, Georgia State University, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: emergency management; disaster recovery; institutional preparedness

Special Issue Information

We are organizing a Special Issue on “Disasters, Crisis, Hazards, Emergencies and Sustainable Development” in Sustainability. The venue is a peer-reviewed international and open access scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the cross-disciplinary area of sustainability and sustainable development. Sustainability has a high visibility and is indexed in Clarivate Analytics (prior Thomson Reuters) Science Citation Index Expanded and the Social Sciences Citation Index database.

Hazards, disasters, crisis and emergencies are key issues threating sustainable development and sustainability. Disasters impact individuals, families, institutions, communities, and societies, not only physically, but also socially. They may cause infrastructure damage, and economic and human life loss. Thus, the wish and processes of sustainable development are always disrupted by various kinds of disasters. Another important theme under investigation is the link between recovery after disasters and sustainable development (Smith and Wenger, 2007). In order to revitalize disaster-impacted families and communities, mitigation and resilience should be integrated into the recovery process to reduce the vulnerability of communities. Therefore, in order to achieve the goal of sustainability and sustainable development, strategies, methods, and technologies for mitigating, preventing, preparing, responding and recovering from all kinds of disasters and crises are needed.

This Special Issue encourages high quality research papers and case studies on the topics of linking disasters, hazards, crisis, and emergencies with sustainability and sustainable development. Contributions on: (1) how disasters, hazards, crisis, and emergencies affect the continuity and sustainability of families, communities, institutions, or even countries; (2) how to integrate mitigation or resilience into the recovery process to build back better or to achieve sustainable development are especially welcomed. Research contributions on other related topics are also encouraged. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of disasters, hazards, crisis, and emergency research, and the cross-disciplinary nature of sustainability research, papers from all disciplines are welcomed.


Dr. Ziqiang Han
Dr. William L. Waugh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • disasters
  • emergencies
  • crises
  • hazards
  • sustainable development

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Optimization of Evacuation Warnings Prior to a Hurricane Disaster
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2152; doi:10.3390/su9112152
Received: 27 October 2017 / Revised: 18 November 2017 / Accepted: 20 November 2017 / Published: 22 November 2017
PDF Full-text (4044 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The key purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that optimization of evacuation warnings by time period and impacted zone is crucial for efficient evacuation of an area impacted by a hurricane. We assume that people behave in a manner consistent with the
[...] Read more.
The key purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that optimization of evacuation warnings by time period and impacted zone is crucial for efficient evacuation of an area impacted by a hurricane. We assume that people behave in a manner consistent with the warnings they receive. By optimizing the issuance of hurricane evacuation warnings, one can control the number of evacuees at different time intervals to avoid congestion in the process of evacuation. The warning optimization model is applied to a case study of Hurricane Sandy using the study region of Brooklyn. We first develop a model for shelter assignment and then use this outcome to model hurricane evacuation warning optimization, which prescribes an evacuation plan that maximizes the number of evacuees. A significant technical contribution is the development of an iterative greedy heuristic procedure for the nonlinear formulation, which is shown to be optimal for the case of a single evacuation zone with a single evacuee type case, while it does not guarantee optimality for multiple zones under unusual circumstances. A significant applied contribution is the demonstration of an interface of the evacuation warning method with a public transportation scheme to facilitate evacuation of a car-less population. This heuristic we employ can be readily adapted to the case where response rate is a function of evacuation number in prior periods and other variable factors. This element is also explored in the context of our experiment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disasters, Crisis, Hazards, Emergencies and Sustainable Development)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Assessing the Extent to Which the UK’s National Risk Register Supports Local Risk Management
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 1991; doi:10.3390/su9111991
Received: 6 October 2017 / Revised: 26 October 2017 / Accepted: 28 October 2017 / Published: 31 October 2017
PDF Full-text (1010 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper examines how a national risk register supports the implementation of disaster risk management practices at a local level. We present a case study of the UK’s National Risk Register of Civil Emergencies and explore stakeholder understanding, views, perceptions, opinions, and application
[...] Read more.
This paper examines how a national risk register supports the implementation of disaster risk management practices at a local level. We present a case study of the UK’s National Risk Register of Civil Emergencies and explore stakeholder understanding, views, perceptions, opinions, and application within the East of England. A semi-structured interview methodology was adopted for this paper with 14 key stakeholders from across the East of England interviewed. Thematic coding analysis was used to structure the results against a set of research questions. Interviewees were found to be largely unaware of the National Risk Register, and as such its usefulness as a risk management tool is limited. In particular, restricted local resources, limited understanding of risk, and a lack of actionable strategies were highlighted as barriers to action. Opportunities for capacity building at the local level, sharing best practice, and improved risk communication were all identified. The National Risk Register could be used to improve risk management at local levels but more engagement with it at a local level is required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disasters, Crisis, Hazards, Emergencies and Sustainable Development)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top