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Special Issue "Clean Waste to Energy"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hossam A. Gabbar (Gaber)

Energy Safety & Control Lab, Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, and Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science (Cross-Appointed), University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 905 721 3046
Fax: +1 905 721 3046
Interests: design of advanced process safety; intelligent control for smart energy grids; micro energy grids with distributed energy resources; integration of small modular reactor (smr); green energy & nuclear facilities; transportation; & production systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

All types of world waste can be effectively utilized to produce clean energy and reduce GHG emissions that can be generated from incineration, and to protect against other harms from landfill. There are different types of waste, each will have their own best ways of conversion to energy. There is a great deal of R&D, systems and process engineering, material, chemical, economical, and management challenges to achieve clean waste to energy technologies and facilities, which requires multidisciplinary studies with a number of applications in different regions around the world, and with respect to the amount of infrastructure. Environmental and sustainability analyses are also an essential part of achieving clean waste to energy and ensure improved environmental protection measures.

  • The overall focus of this Special Issue is to present state-of-the-art technologies of waste to energy, and to present papers that cover the analysis and engineering side of clean waste to energy with an emphasis on technology development, evaluation, and implementations, with verification and applications in a number of regions, and with respect to transportation fuel and infrastructure.
  • The scope of this Special Issue will be on analysis of waste to energy processes, technology development, evaluation and verification, implementation, and economical analysis. This includes planning, risk management, control systems, and chemical process systems. It will also include sustainability analyses to demonstrate clean waste to energy technologies and processes compared with other alternatives to waste management.
  • The main purpose of the Special Issue is to cover the latest research, studies, review, innovation, implementation, and applications in the different areas of waste to energy.

The Special Issue will be suitable to link to existing literature in the areas of waste management, materials science, chemical process, systems engineering, economical analysis, and sustainability analysis. It will support advances in research and development and technology implementation to promote waste to energy systems.

References:

C. Ducharme, N., 2010. Analysis of Thermal Plasma-Assisted Waste-to-Energy Processes. Florida, ASME Proceedings | Advancing Waste To Energy Through Research and Technology.

Canada, E., 1986. The national incinerator testing and evaluation program: Air pollution control technology, s.l.: Report No. EPS 3/UP/2, Ottawa.

D.Panepinto, A. G., 2016. Energy recovery from waste incineration: economic aspects. Clean Technology Environment Policy, 18(2), p. 517 – 527.

Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs, U., 2013. Incineration of municipal solid waste, s.l.: Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs.

E.Gomez, D. R. C. D. M. A., 2009. Thermal plasma technology for the treatment of wastes: A critical review. Elsevier, Journal of Hazardous Materials , Volume 161.

E.Thorin, E. B., 2012. Waste to energy– A review. Suzhou, In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Applied Energy, ICAE .

F.Kreith, G., 2002. Handbook of solid waste management. s.l.:McGraw-Hill handbooks.

F.N.C.Anyaegbunam, 2014. Thermal plasma solution for environmental waste management and power generation. Journal of Applied Physics, 6(5), pp. 8-16.

G.Bonizzoni, E., 2002. Plasma physics and technology; industrial applications. Elsevier, Vacuum 64, Volume 64.

G.C.Young, 2010. Municipal solid waste to energy conversion processes , Economic technical and renewable comparisons. Pg.9 ed. s.l.:Wiley.

H.Cheng, H. Y., 2010. Municipal solid waste (MSW) as a renewable source of energy: current and future practices in China. Elsevier, Biosource Technology, 101(11), p. 3816 – 3824.

H.Daniel & B.Tata, P., 2012. What a Waste : A Global Review of Solid Waste Management. Urban development series; knowledge papers , World Bank, Washington, Volume 15.

H.Huang, L., 2007. Treatment of organic waste using thermal plasma pyrolysis technology. Elsevier, Energy Conversion and Management 48, Volume 48.

 

Keywords

  • MSW
  • PSW
  • plastic-to-oil
  • bio-waste
  • waste cycles/recycles
  • economical analysis
  • sustainability
  • waste management
  • biofuel
  • clean fuel for transportation
  • economical analysis of waste conversion
  • waste to energy systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Power-to-Gas Implementation for a Polygeneration System in Southwestern Ontario
Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1610; doi:10.3390/su9091610
Received: 10 August 2017 / Revised: 2 September 2017 / Accepted: 7 September 2017 / Published: 10 September 2017
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Abstract
Canada has stockpiles of waste petroleum coke, a high carbon waste product leftover from oil production with little positive market value. A polygeneration process is proposed which implements “power-to-gas” technology, through the use of electrolysis and surplus grid electricity, to use waste petroleum
[...] Read more.
Canada has stockpiles of waste petroleum coke, a high carbon waste product leftover from oil production with little positive market value. A polygeneration process is proposed which implements “power-to-gas” technology, through the use of electrolysis and surplus grid electricity, to use waste petroleum coke and biomass to create a carbon monoxide-rich stream after gasification, which is then converted into a portfolio of value-added products with the addition of hydrogen. A model implementing mixed-integer linear programming integrates power-to-gas technology and AspenPlus simulates the polygeneration process. The downstream production rates are selected using particle swarm optimization. When comparing 100% electrolysis vs. 100% steam reforming as a source of hydrogen production, electrolysis provides a larger net present value due to the carbon pricing introduced in Canada and the cost reduction from removal of the air separation unit by using the oxygen from the electrolysers. The optimal percent of hydrogen produced from electrolysis is about 82% with a hydrogen input of 7600 kg/h. The maximum net present value is $332 M when over 75% production rate is dimethyl ether or $203 M when the dimethyl ether is capped at 50% production. The polygeneration plant is an example of green technology used to environmentally process Canada’s petroleum coke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clean Waste to Energy)
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Open AccessArticle Conceptual Design and Energy Analysis of Integrated Combined Cycle Gasification System
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1474; doi:10.3390/su9081474
Received: 24 July 2017 / Revised: 9 August 2017 / Accepted: 10 August 2017 / Published: 19 August 2017
PDF Full-text (5858 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, an integrated gasification combined cycle conceptual design that achieves optimum energy efficiency and 82.9% heat integration between hot and cold utilities is illustrated. The integrated combined gasification cycle (IGCC) is also modeled and evaluated for the co-production of electricity, ammonia
[...] Read more.
In this paper, an integrated gasification combined cycle conceptual design that achieves optimum energy efficiency and 82.9% heat integration between hot and cold utilities is illustrated. The integrated combined gasification cycle (IGCC) is also modeled and evaluated for the co-production of electricity, ammonia and methane for 543.13 kilo tonne per annum (KTA) of municipal solid waste (MSW). The final products are 1284.89 MW, 8731.07 kg/h of liquid ammonia at 8 °C and 32,468 kg/h of methane gas at 271 °C. The conceptual design includes advanced heat integration between syngas and hot and cold streams in all process units. The water gas shift (WGS) unit includes integration between equilibrium reactors and cold streams. The air separation unit (ASU) includes four air compressors followed by a pressure swing adsorber (PSA), which separates oxygen and nitrogen gases into separate streams. Both O2 and N2 gases are compressed and sent to gasifier and syngas cleaning unit, respectively. The overall design shows reliability and solved steady state equations for all process units with improvements in thermal efficiency in comparison with single cycle gasification plants. The environmental emissions for GHGs such CO2 and SO2 are lower due to higher overall energy efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clean Waste to Energy)
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