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Special Issue "Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Developing Countries: Current Trends and Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Mohammad Nurunnabi

College of Business Administration, Prince Sultan University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: CSR; sustainability; governance; business and society; policy; culture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is designed to spotlight contemporary research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developing countries, with preference given to research emphasizing local or context. Previous research on CSR has been focused principally based on the western-contexts in the last 40 years. The Special Issue will, therefore, provide an opportunity for contributors to spotlight their contributions to the broad fields of business, economics, political science, law accounting, finance, marketing, supply chain, international business and management are all welcome. The following themes would be of particular interest (NB: this list is not exhaustive):

  • What are the current trends of CSR research in developing countries?
  • What are the important developments of CSR so far in developing countries?
  • What questions needed to be asked to develop fruitful future research directions on CSR in developing countries?
  • What are theoretical implications of CSR in developing countries?
  • How can CSR be specified and compared in different developing countries contexts?
  • Where can CSR research offer best practices in developing countries?
  • What are the practical and methodological challenges of conducting CSR research?
  • What are the practical challenges of implementing CSR strategy in developing countries?

 Dr. Mohammad Nurunnabi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • CSR
  • Developing Countries
  • Challenge
  • Opportunities
  • Development

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle CSR Reporting Practices in Visegrad Group Countries and the Quality of Disclosure
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2322; doi:10.3390/su9122322
Received: 23 November 2017 / Revised: 7 December 2017 / Accepted: 8 December 2017 / Published: 13 December 2017
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Abstract
Companies around the world more often issue publicly available reports to disclose how responsibly they conduct their business. The practices of corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting are more popular in western part of Europe then in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries and
[...] Read more.
Companies around the world more often issue publicly available reports to disclose how responsibly they conduct their business. The practices of corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting are more popular in western part of Europe then in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries and empirical studies related to these practices in the region are sporadic and fragmented. The Visegrad Group countries have undergone tremendous changes in political, environmental and social area during the last twenty years. The CSR concept in these countries is relatively new but is rapidly spreading, in particular as part of their integration with the European Union, as well as under the influence of transnational corporations (TNCs) and foreign investors. Therefore, acquisition of knowledge, which presents the functioning of CSR reporting practices in the region seems to be of interest to both the scientific community and enterprises themselves. An important part of the analysis conducted in the study was the assessment of quality of CSR reports issued in this region. The quality indicator of the studied reports was based on seventeen criteria related to relevance and credibility of disclosed information. The findings indicate that CSR reporting practices are not widespread among V4 countries and suggest some area of improvements. Furthermore, the achieved results confirm the existence of a relationship between two factors (external verification of a report and usage of the GRI guidelines when developing a report) and the level of quality of the CSR report. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Organizational Identification Perspective of CSR on Creative Performance: The Moderating Role of Creative Self-Efficacy
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2125; doi:10.3390/su9112125
Received: 19 October 2017 / Revised: 12 November 2017 / Accepted: 14 November 2017 / Published: 18 November 2017
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Abstract
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an emerging and fast-growing concept for both academic research and organizations. In recent years, the far-reaching influence of CSR practices on stakeholders has made both researchers and practitioners pay heed to this dimension. Employees are one of the
[...] Read more.
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an emerging and fast-growing concept for both academic research and organizations. In recent years, the far-reaching influence of CSR practices on stakeholders has made both researchers and practitioners pay heed to this dimension. Employees are one of the most important stakeholders influenced by CSR practices. CSR brings in many ideas, concepts, and techniques. In the past, different antecedents and consequences of corporate social responsibility have been studied, but there is still a deficit in regard to whether employee creative performance is an outcome of corporate social responsibility, and the interlinked variables that might enhance this relationship. The main objective of this study is to examine how CSR practices enhance employee performances within the organization, and which other variables may enhance this relationship. The literature suggests that employees who value CSR campaigns and other practices identify with their company to a greater degree, work with more devotion and loyalty, and show more creativity in their work performance. In this study, organizational identification has been taken as the mediator, and creative self-efficacy has been taken as the moderator. The hypotheses were tested within the sample of companies engaging in CSR practices in Pakistan. A questionnaire survey was conducted using simple random sampling. Simple linear regression, hierarchical regression, and Barron and Kenny tests were applied through SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Science) for data analysis, and results were found according to the proposed model of the study. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Signaling Product Quality Information in Supply Chains via Corporate Social Responsibility Choices
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2113; doi:10.3390/su9112113
Received: 10 September 2017 / Revised: 10 November 2017 / Accepted: 14 November 2017 / Published: 18 November 2017
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Abstract
This study focuses on how an upstream supplier signals the private information of its product quality with corporate social responsibility (CSR) choices to a downstream retailer and uninformed consumers in the final market. We build a signaling model to: capture the strategic interactions
[...] Read more.
This study focuses on how an upstream supplier signals the private information of its product quality with corporate social responsibility (CSR) choices to a downstream retailer and uninformed consumers in the final market. We build a signaling model to: capture the strategic interactions among the supplier, the retailer, and the final consumers in the supply chain; characterize completely the set of all separating perfect Bayesian equilibriums (PBEs); and finally, select a unique equilibrium that satisfies the intuitive criterion for exploring some comparative statics. The equilibrium results show that under some technical conditions: (1) a set of moderate levels of CSR conduct signal the upstream supplier’s high quality in the sense of separating PBEs; (2) the unique separating PBE satisfying the intuitive criterion is the one with the lowest CSR level that separates a high-quality supplier from a low-quality supplier; (3) the lowest CSR level decreases in the proportion of informed consumers and the low-quality supplier’s marginal CSR cost, but is independent of the high-quality supplier’s marginal CSR cost; (4) the profits of the high-quality supplier increase in proportion to the number of informed consumers and the low-quality supplier’s marginal cost CSR, but decrease in proportion to the high-quality supplier’s marginal CSR cost. Managerial insights are also discussed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on the Workforce of Selected Business Firms in the United Arab Emirates: A Nascent Economy
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2077; doi:10.3390/su9112077
Received: 15 October 2017 / Revised: 3 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 12 November 2017
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Abstract
The main purpose of this study is to explore the impact of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) on employees working in two United Arab Emirates (UAE)-based companies. “Hilti Emirates” and “EROS Group” are the two companies that engage in a number of CSR applications
[...] Read more.
The main purpose of this study is to explore the impact of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) on employees working in two United Arab Emirates (UAE)-based companies. “Hilti Emirates” and “EROS Group” are the two companies that engage in a number of CSR applications which were focused on India in 2015. The impact of CSR on the companies is the key focus in this study by gauging employees’ and managers’ perceptions. Primary data were collected by means of a prepared questionnaire that concentrated on employee and managerial behavior and attitudes, while secondary data were collected from theoretical articles and published company reports. Data were analyzed by means of statistical analysis using SPSS software. Methods like factor analysis, descriptive analysis and ANOVA in SPSS software are helpful in assessing the effect of CSR on employees, and hence companies, in the UAE. The main findings of the study are that employees can develop a behavioral change depending on the nature of CSR practices within the company. In turn, CSR polices are sustainable in relation to company profit which may vary from one company to another and one financial year to another. Therefore, this study concludes that employee behavior regarding CSR policies has notable and positive implications, relevant to the company as well as to the employees and management. The two leading UAE companies demonstrate a confluent pattern of CSR practices and effects that may also relate to employee behavior in other economies, although the researchers encourage more investigations to corroborate that view. Full article
Open AccessArticle Do Peer Firms Affect Firm Corporate Social Responsibility?
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 1967; doi:10.3390/su9111967
Received: 7 October 2017 / Revised: 24 October 2017 / Accepted: 26 October 2017 / Published: 29 October 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (181 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Peer-firm strategies are a critical factor for corporate finance, and corporate social responsibility (CSR) is the main trend for evaluating the behavior of firms. On the basis of the connection between peer strategy and CSR, this paper explores the CSR strategies employed by
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Peer-firm strategies are a critical factor for corporate finance, and corporate social responsibility (CSR) is the main trend for evaluating the behavior of firms. On the basis of the connection between peer strategy and CSR, this paper explores the CSR strategies employed by a sample of Chinese firms during the 2008–2015 period. Our two main empirical findings are as follows. First, the CSR strategies of firms have a positive effect on their CSR behavior. Second, when there is the CSR gap between firms and peer firms, firms will feel the pressure from stakeholders and the public and improve the level of CSR performance. Our paper enriches empirical research on the CSR behavior of Chinese firms. Full article
Open AccessArticle Exploring the Organizational Culture’s Moderating Role of Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) on Firm Performance: Focused on Corporate Contributions in Korea
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1883; doi:10.3390/su9101883
Received: 11 September 2017 / Revised: 12 October 2017 / Accepted: 16 October 2017 / Published: 19 October 2017
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the role of organizational culture in helping to translate corporate social responsibility (CSR) into firm performance. We employed arguments from the CSR strategy view to highlight the effectiveness of CSR and the contingency approach to
[...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine the role of organizational culture in helping to translate corporate social responsibility (CSR) into firm performance. We employed arguments from the CSR strategy view to highlight the effectiveness of CSR and the contingency approach to explain the vertical fit between CSR and the organizational culture in a firm. Furthermore, we examined the moderating influence of organizational culture on the CSR–firm performance linkage. The results suggest that some organizational cultures moderate the relationship between CSR and financial outcomes, and that organizational culture may play an important role in enhancing a positive relationship between CSR and firm performance. Full article
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