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Special Issue "Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Lisa McNeill

Department of Marketing, Otago Business School, University of Otago, New Zealand
Website | E-Mail
Interests: consumer behaviour; consumption; sustainability; manufacturing and retail; fashion consumption; consumer decision-making

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current consumption patterns worldwide are recognized as unsustainable, with efforts in recent years to address critical ecological and social problems through models that encourage the growth of environment friendly behaviours amongst consumers. Many of these models are institutional or legislative in their nature, and the broader issue of leveraging change in consumption behaviour, specifically related to sustainable action, remains a topical area for investigation. Understanding buying behaviour is an important aspect of enacting consumer change, and this Special Issue calls for submissions that explore transforming consumer practices that have negative environmental or social impacts. Further, to meet the sustainability challenges we face, theories offering broader, system-level initiatives are required of researchers. It is apparent that consumers are calling for more information on sustainability in relation to production processes and that frameworks for sustainable production can be viewed through a consumption lens, with a purpose of empowering the consumer and creating catalysts for change. This Special Issue seeks to connect literature on consumption patterns, behaviour change and socially oriented decision-making by consumers. Further, the issue will highlight the intersection between sustainable production processes and encouraging sustainable forms of consumption by individuals.

We thus invite researchers to contribute original research, as well as review articles, that address the topics of consumer action in sustainable consumption, communities of practice, agency and context in sustainable consumption, and the role of sustainable production in consumer behaviour change.

Dr. Lisa McNeill
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • consumption
  • production
  • sustainable action
  • consumption systems
  • consumer behaviour change

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Plant-Based Lunch at Work: Effects on Nutrient Intake, Environmental Impact and Tastiness—A Case Study
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 227; doi:10.3390/su10010227
Received: 13 December 2017 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 17 January 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the environmental impact, nutrient intake, appreciation and tastiness of three buffet-style lunches served at the workplace, consisting of (1) animal-based foods; (2) plant-based foods; and (3) both animal-based and plant-based foods. Employees of the National
[...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to determine the environmental impact, nutrient intake, appreciation and tastiness of three buffet-style lunches served at the workplace, consisting of (1) animal-based foods; (2) plant-based foods; and (3) both animal-based and plant-based foods. Employees of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands participated in the study. Participants scored the lunch for appreciation and tastiness (scores from 1 to 10). Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and land use associated with foods consumed were calculated using life cycle assessments. Nutrient intake was calculated using food composition data. The results show that both the plant-based and the combination lunch received higher scores for tastiness than the animal-based lunch. GHG emissions and land use were lowest for the plant-based lunch and highest for the animal-based lunch. The combination lunch was associated with increased fiber and decreased saturated fat intake compared to the animal-based lunch, but also lead to increased energy intake. The plant-based lunch did not increase energy intake, while increasing fiber intake and decreasing sodium (salt) and saturated fat intakes. These initial results show that plant-based lunches have the potential to improve nutrient intake and tastiness while reducing environmental impact. Additional research in this field is worthwhile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
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Open AccessArticle Raising Awareness on Health Impact of the Chemicals Used in Consumer Products: Empirical Evidence from East-Central Europe
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 209; doi:10.3390/su10010209
Received: 16 November 2017 / Revised: 30 December 2017 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 16 January 2018
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Abstract
Recent research and guidance provided by regulatory authorities address the growing concerns on the control of chemicals used in consumer products. In this context, this study responds to literature alerts emphasizing the need for promoting risk reduction by decreasing the use of damaging
[...] Read more.
Recent research and guidance provided by regulatory authorities address the growing concerns on the control of chemicals used in consumer products. In this context, this study responds to literature alerts emphasizing the need for promoting risk reduction by decreasing the use of damaging chemicals and raising public awareness on this issue. It focuses on East-Central Europe and investigates whether consumers are worried about the impact on health of chemicals, and whether they think there is enough information available in this sense. The study uses logistic regression in order to analyze the secondary data from Special Eurobarometer No. 416 (part of Eurobarometer Wave EB 81.3, European Commission, 2014), namely 27,998 interviews collected in all 28 EU countries, of which 11,460 are from East-Central Europe. The research reveals a profile of East-Central Europeans, who consider that they lack information on the topic, and identifies the most effective way of reaching these people according to their perceptions and habits. Reporting results on a representative sample in East-Central Europe, the study indicates the channels, sources of information, and trusted institutions in order to support a campaign for raising public awareness on the health impact of chemicals used in consumer products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
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Open AccessArticle Evaluating the Environmental Consequences of Swedish Food Consumption and Dietary Choices
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2227; doi:10.3390/su9122227
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 27 November 2017 / Accepted: 28 November 2017 / Published: 1 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2214 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In recent years, a growing interest from consumers to know the origins and contents of foods has put alternative choices, such as organic foods and dietary changes, on the agenda. Dietary choices are important to address, as many studies find that activities related
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In recent years, a growing interest from consumers to know the origins and contents of foods has put alternative choices, such as organic foods and dietary changes, on the agenda. Dietary choices are important to address, as many studies find that activities related to food production account for nearly 20–30% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Nonetheless, while GHG emissions are important, often other environmental impact categories are not considered in the assessment of the sustainability of different foods, diets and choices. This study aims to quantify the implications of dietary choices for Swedish food consumption on a broad range of environmental impact categories using life cycle assessment to provide insight into the impacts, and potential tradeoffs, associated with certain food products and dietary choices. Scenarios are used to assess the implications of diets with reduced meat, increased Swedish food consumption, increased organic foods, vegan and semi-vegetarian diets. The results indicate that tradeoffs could be possible with certain dietary choices. Increasing Swedish food production and consumption may lead to lower impacts for all impact categories by reducing imports, although limitations in growing season and availability of foods in Sweden allows only for minor increases. The results also indicate that large reductions of greenhouse gas emissions are possible by reducing meat consumption, i.e., by halving meat consumption and through vegan and vegetarian diets. Nonetheless, an increase in vegetable, legume and fruit products may lead to a potential increase in human and ecosystem toxicity. Diets based on nutritional guidelines, show reductions in all impact categories, as these guidelines call for an increase in vegetables and fruits and a reduction in meat consumption. An increase in organic foods showed no significant change in climate impact, although toxicity potential was reduced significantly. Increasing consumption of organic foods may also lead to a reduction in biodiversity damage potential, and if all food is produced organically, it risks increasing eutrophication and land use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
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