E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Lisa McNeill

Department of Marketing, Otago Business School, University of Otago, New Zealand
Website | E-Mail
Interests: consumer behaviour; consumption; sustainability; manufacturing and retail; fashion consumption; consumer decision-making

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current consumption patterns worldwide are recognized as unsustainable, with efforts in recent years to address critical ecological and social problems through models that encourage the growth of environment friendly behaviours amongst consumers. Many of these models are institutional or legislative in their nature, and the broader issue of leveraging change in consumption behaviour, specifically related to sustainable action, remains a topical area for investigation. Understanding buying behaviour is an important aspect of enacting consumer change, and this Special Issue calls for submissions that explore transforming consumer practices that have negative environmental or social impacts. Further, to meet the sustainability challenges we face, theories offering broader, system-level initiatives are required of researchers. It is apparent that consumers are calling for more information on sustainability in relation to production processes and that frameworks for sustainable production can be viewed through a consumption lens, with a purpose of empowering the consumer and creating catalysts for change. This Special Issue seeks to connect literature on consumption patterns, behaviour change and socially oriented decision-making by consumers. Further, the issue will highlight the intersection between sustainable production processes and encouraging sustainable forms of consumption by individuals.

We thus invite researchers to contribute original research, as well as review articles, that address the topics of consumer action in sustainable consumption, communities of practice, agency and context in sustainable consumption, and the role of sustainable production in consumer behaviour change.

Dr. Lisa McNeill
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • consumption
  • production
  • sustainable action
  • consumption systems
  • consumer behaviour change

Published Papers (8 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-8
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Sustainable Consumption in Everyday Life: A Qualitative Study of UK Consumer Experiences of Meat Reduction
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2307; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072307
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 25 June 2018 / Accepted: 29 June 2018 / Published: 4 July 2018
PDF Full-text (206 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A reduction in meat consumption is increasingly considered fundamental to a sustainable food system. This paper contributes to understanding how meat consumers enact ‘meat reduction’ in the context of their everyday lives, exploring the motivations, strategies and experiences of eating less meat. Data
[...] Read more.
A reduction in meat consumption is increasingly considered fundamental to a sustainable food system. This paper contributes to understanding how meat consumers enact ‘meat reduction’ in the context of their everyday lives, exploring the motivations, strategies and experiences of eating less meat. Data were generated through twenty in-depth interviews with UK meat eaters, half of whom aimed to reduce their meat intake. Accounts from three meat-reducing respondents are used to present insights from the in-depth exploration of meat reduction in relation to broader practices of eating and food provision in daily life, interpreted through the lens of a practice-oriented understanding of consumption. Findings suggest that the enactment of meat reduction is determined by factors beyond individuals’ ethical stance towards environmental issues or animal welfare. Rather, meat reduction relates to understandings of nutrition and vitality of the body, concerns about the conditions of meat provision, and the personal relationships and routine activities through which meals are sourced, prepared and eaten. The study highlights the variety in understandings underpinning the motivations and strategies of consumer meat reduction. The analysis contributes to the literature on sustainable consumption and production, with a case study of the lived experience of sustainable dietary change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
Open AccessArticle “People Gather for Stranger Things, So Why Not This?” Learning Sustainable Sensibilities through Communal Garment-Mending Practices
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2218; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072218
Received: 29 April 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 8 June 2018 / Published: 28 June 2018
PDF Full-text (6459 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study uses a sociomaterial practice theoretical lens to explore the learning processes and outcomes of non-professional menders emerging through their participation in communal mending workshops. Recent years have witnessed an emergence of repair workshops that seek to provide an alternative to the
[...] Read more.
This study uses a sociomaterial practice theoretical lens to explore the learning processes and outcomes of non-professional menders emerging through their participation in communal mending workshops. Recent years have witnessed an emergence of repair workshops that seek to provide an alternative to the make-take-waste paradigm dominating the fast fashion industry in most Western countries. The paper is based on three months of extensive fieldwork in six repair workshops in two cities in New Zealand (Auckland and Wellington). Thirty-five in-depth interviews, eight follow-up surveys and field notes from participant observations were used to collect data. A triangulation of the methods and open coding helped identify three types of learning streams from the data: material learning, communal learning, and environmental learning. The learned outcomes aided in equipping participants with knowledge of how to mend, extend use of existing garments, address alternatives to garment disposal, create feelings of caring, self-reliance and empowerment in communities, and differentiate between good- and bad-quality garments. In this way, communal workshops help users to be more proactive in providing sustainable local solutions to global ecological problems and create diversified learning around sociomaterial and ecological aspects of garments and their use. This could potentially create awareness of the importance of buying better and more durable garments in the future to keep them longer in use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Consumer Intention toward Bringing Your Own Shopping Bags in Taiwan: An Application of Ethics Perspective and Theory of Planned Behavior
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 1815; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061815
Received: 29 March 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 25 May 2018 / Published: 31 May 2018
PDF Full-text (946 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Following Chan and coworkers’ (2008) research, the current study integrated Hunt and Vitell’s (1986) ethics perspective and Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to present a model that explains consumers’ intention to “Bring Your Own Shopping Bags” (BYOB) with grocery shopping. The proposed model
[...] Read more.
Following Chan and coworkers’ (2008) research, the current study integrated Hunt and Vitell’s (1986) ethics perspective and Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to present a model that explains consumers’ intention to “Bring Your Own Shopping Bags” (BYOB) with grocery shopping. The proposed model is empirically validated in Taiwan. Based on a survey of 601 respondents, the findings suggest that consumers’ deontological evaluation is positively related to their attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control, while teleological evaluation is positively related to perceived behavioral control only. In addition, the results also indicate that consumers’ attitude and perceived behavioral control has a positive relationship with BYOB intention, while subjective norm does not have a signification relationship with BYOB intention. In sum, this study contributes to the literature by providing insights for applying general ethics and theory of planned behavior to explain consumers’ BYOB behavior. The results also provide policy makers guidelines regarding BYOB. Managerial implications and research limitations are discussed at the end of this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Environmental Knowledge, Awareness, and Business School Students’ Intentions to Purchase Green Vehicles in Emerging Countries
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1534; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051534
Received: 5 March 2018 / Revised: 13 April 2018 / Accepted: 16 April 2018 / Published: 11 May 2018
PDF Full-text (542 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Environmental awareness and changing attitudes toward “green consumption” are becoming evident in emerging countries’ markets. Using an extended theory of planned behavior, this paper aims to examine emerging countries’ business students’ intentions to purchase green vehicles. Stratified random sampling was used to select
[...] Read more.
Environmental awareness and changing attitudes toward “green consumption” are becoming evident in emerging countries’ markets. Using an extended theory of planned behavior, this paper aims to examine emerging countries’ business students’ intentions to purchase green vehicles. Stratified random sampling was used to select study participants, and data were collected through face-to-face interviews. Results revealed that environmental knowledge and awareness have a significant influence on business students’ favorable attitudes toward green vehicles. Further, a significant association between attitudes toward green vehicles, perceived behavioral controls, and intentions to purchase green vehicles was observed. Findings serve to inform managers and policy makers who are formulating strategies for maximizing value creation in an era of increasingly environmentally aware consumers in emerging markets. Ultimately, this policy will help to promote green technology initiatives, and encourage higher rates of adoption of eco-friendly vehicles in emerging countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle To Cooperate or Not? An Analysis of Complementary Product Pricing in Green Supply Chain
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1392; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051392
Received: 6 March 2018 / Revised: 9 April 2018 / Accepted: 18 April 2018 / Published: 2 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1029 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper investigates the green supply chain pricing problem when two manufacturers sell complementary products to one retailer. Considering the manufacturers’ cooperation or noncooperation strategies, we first give the centralized pricing model as a benchmark. According to market power among the supply chain,
[...] Read more.
This paper investigates the green supply chain pricing problem when two manufacturers sell complementary products to one retailer. Considering the manufacturers’ cooperation or noncooperation strategies, we first give the centralized pricing model as a benchmark. According to market power among the supply chain, we analyze two types of supply chains: supplier-led type where the green driving factor comes from the suppliers and retailer-led type where the core member retailer leads the green supply chain. We then give two decentralized pricing models through considering strategic cooperation between two manufacturers and different structures. Corresponding closed-form expressions for equilibrium pricing strategies are established. Finally, many valuable managerial results are acquired through comparing the profits and equilibrium decisions of these models. Our paper shows that consumers are indifferent as to who is the leader of the two echelons when the manufacturers adopt non-cooperative action; the two complementary products get the same optimal wholesale/retail prices, maximum retail margins, and maximum demands regardless of the manufacturers’ cooperation or noncooperation strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
Figures

Figure 1a

Open AccessArticle Plant-Based Lunch at Work: Effects on Nutrient Intake, Environmental Impact and Tastiness—A Case Study
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010227
Received: 13 December 2017 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 17 January 2018
PDF Full-text (534 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the environmental impact, nutrient intake, appreciation and tastiness of three buffet-style lunches served at the workplace, consisting of (1) animal-based foods; (2) plant-based foods; and (3) both animal-based and plant-based foods. Employees of the National
[...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to determine the environmental impact, nutrient intake, appreciation and tastiness of three buffet-style lunches served at the workplace, consisting of (1) animal-based foods; (2) plant-based foods; and (3) both animal-based and plant-based foods. Employees of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands participated in the study. Participants scored the lunch for appreciation and tastiness (scores from 1 to 10). Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and land use associated with foods consumed were calculated using life cycle assessments. Nutrient intake was calculated using food composition data. The results show that both the plant-based and the combination lunch received higher scores for tastiness than the animal-based lunch. GHG emissions and land use were lowest for the plant-based lunch and highest for the animal-based lunch. The combination lunch was associated with increased fiber and decreased saturated fat intake compared to the animal-based lunch, but also lead to increased energy intake. The plant-based lunch did not increase energy intake, while increasing fiber intake and decreasing sodium (salt) and saturated fat intakes. These initial results show that plant-based lunches have the potential to improve nutrient intake and tastiness while reducing environmental impact. Additional research in this field is worthwhile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Raising Awareness on Health Impact of the Chemicals Used in Consumer Products: Empirical Evidence from East-Central Europe
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010209
Received: 16 November 2017 / Revised: 30 December 2017 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 16 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (377 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent research and guidance provided by regulatory authorities address the growing concerns on the control of chemicals used in consumer products. In this context, this study responds to literature alerts emphasizing the need for promoting risk reduction by decreasing the use of damaging
[...] Read more.
Recent research and guidance provided by regulatory authorities address the growing concerns on the control of chemicals used in consumer products. In this context, this study responds to literature alerts emphasizing the need for promoting risk reduction by decreasing the use of damaging chemicals and raising public awareness on this issue. It focuses on East-Central Europe and investigates whether consumers are worried about the impact on health of chemicals, and whether they think there is enough information available in this sense. The study uses logistic regression in order to analyze the secondary data from Special Eurobarometer No. 416 (part of Eurobarometer Wave EB 81.3, European Commission, 2014), namely 27,998 interviews collected in all 28 EU countries, of which 11,460 are from East-Central Europe. The research reveals a profile of East-Central Europeans, who consider that they lack information on the topic, and identifies the most effective way of reaching these people according to their perceptions and habits. Reporting results on a representative sample in East-Central Europe, the study indicates the channels, sources of information, and trusted institutions in order to support a campaign for raising public awareness on the health impact of chemicals used in consumer products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Evaluating the Environmental Consequences of Swedish Food Consumption and Dietary Choices
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2227; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9122227
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 27 November 2017 / Accepted: 28 November 2017 / Published: 1 December 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2214 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In recent years, a growing interest from consumers to know the origins and contents of foods has put alternative choices, such as organic foods and dietary changes, on the agenda. Dietary choices are important to address, as many studies find that activities related
[...] Read more.
In recent years, a growing interest from consumers to know the origins and contents of foods has put alternative choices, such as organic foods and dietary changes, on the agenda. Dietary choices are important to address, as many studies find that activities related to food production account for nearly 20–30% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Nonetheless, while GHG emissions are important, often other environmental impact categories are not considered in the assessment of the sustainability of different foods, diets and choices. This study aims to quantify the implications of dietary choices for Swedish food consumption on a broad range of environmental impact categories using life cycle assessment to provide insight into the impacts, and potential tradeoffs, associated with certain food products and dietary choices. Scenarios are used to assess the implications of diets with reduced meat, increased Swedish food consumption, increased organic foods, vegan and semi-vegetarian diets. The results indicate that tradeoffs could be possible with certain dietary choices. Increasing Swedish food production and consumption may lead to lower impacts for all impact categories by reducing imports, although limitations in growing season and availability of foods in Sweden allows only for minor increases. The results also indicate that large reductions of greenhouse gas emissions are possible by reducing meat consumption, i.e., by halving meat consumption and through vegan and vegetarian diets. Nonetheless, an increase in vegetable, legume and fruit products may lead to a potential increase in human and ecosystem toxicity. Diets based on nutritional guidelines, show reductions in all impact categories, as these guidelines call for an increase in vegetables and fruits and a reduction in meat consumption. An increase in organic foods showed no significant change in climate impact, although toxicity potential was reduced significantly. Increasing consumption of organic foods may also lead to a reduction in biodiversity damage potential, and if all food is produced organically, it risks increasing eutrophication and land use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Action in Consumption and Production)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top