Special Issue "Active Aging and Wellbeing: Advancement of Interdisciplinary Research"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Lucia Monacis

Department of Humanities, University of Foggia, Via Arpi 155/176, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: quality of life and health behavior; assessment; behavioural addictions; individual differences underlying adaptive and maladaptive behaviors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Population aging has been associated with the increase in life expectancy thanks to the development of socio-economic progress, lifelong education, and biomedical and psychological advancements. Indeed, the new paradigm of successful aging, or aging well and active aging, has been assumed as a key concept, based on the assumption that aging is a long process determined, not only by genetic factors (age and genes), but also by the interactions between socio-environmental factors and individual and behavioral events. In this direction, active aging has been defined as the process of optimizing opportunities for health, participation and security, in order to enhance quality of life and wellbeing as people age (WHO 2002).

The goal of this Special Issue is to advance the literature on active aging from an interdisciplinary perspective. Therefore, articles can be theoretically or empirically driven, from global to local scales, focusing on factors in each domain of active aging and on the mechanisms linking these domains.

Prof. Lucia Monacis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Active aging
  • Wellbeing
  • Protective and risk factors
  • Interdisciplinary approach

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Dynamics of Volunteering and Life Satisfaction in Midlife and Old Age: Findings from 12 European Countries
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(5), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7050078
Received: 20 March 2018 / Revised: 29 April 2018 / Accepted: 29 April 2018 / Published: 4 May 2018
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Abstract
A growing literature shows that doing voluntary work not only helps the wider community but can also improve one’s own well-being. To date, however, few studies have examined the relationship between volunteering and well-being in non-US and especially in comparative data. We study
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A growing literature shows that doing voluntary work not only helps the wider community but can also improve one’s own well-being. To date, however, few studies have examined the relationship between volunteering and well-being in non-US and especially in comparative data. We study this relationship using two waves of data of 18,559 individuals aged 50 and above from 12 European countries. We analyze life satisfaction impacts of change and stability in volunteering status and in the intensity (frequency) of volunteering, and explore whether these impacts differ according to life stage (age, employment status) and across countries with different norms and supports for voluntarism. Findings show that net life satisfaction is higher among longer-term, recent, and former volunteers than among stable (long-term) non-volunteers. There are no significant life satisfaction differences between the three groups with volunteer experience. Equally, similar levels of life satisfaction are observed among people who have increased and decreased their frequency of volunteering. It thus seems to be the experience and not the dynamics (i.e., change or persistence) of volunteering that is associated with well-being. Findings further suggest life course variation in the association between volunteering and well-being, as the relationship is stronger for older and long-term non-employed (mostly retired) individuals than for their middle-aged and working counterparts. The relationship is also stronger in countries where volunteering is less common and less institutionally supported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Aging and Wellbeing: Advancement of Interdisciplinary Research)
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