Special Issue "Social Inequality and the Global Slave Trade"

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A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Valerie Zawilski

Department of Sociology, King's University College, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 2M3, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: social inequality; social movements; social justice in post-conflict societies; global health and human trafficking

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Social inequality is a politically, economically and socially constructed social phenomenon. Scholars recognize that social inequality is an international social problem that affects people through multiple sites of oppression, which comprise a matrix of domination. Intersections of inequality may include categories such as race, gender, class, sexual orientation, age, size, mental and physical disabilities, religious, regional and cultural identities. This special issue on social inequality will focus on the rise of the Global Slave Trade. Papers that examine the global and transnational links and neo-colonial origins of human trafficking, sexual slavery, the feminization of poverty, and child poverty especially in the Global South, will be considered for publication. This issue will focus on the socio-political origins of Global Slavery which is one of the most serious social problems in the world today.

Dr. Valerie Zawilski
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • slavery
  • matrix of domination
  • human trafficking

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Public Discourse on Human Trafficking in International Issue Arenas
Societies 2015, 5(1), 14-42; doi:10.3390/soc5010014
Received: 19 June 2014 / Accepted: 4 January 2015 / Published: 12 January 2015
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Abstract
The purpose of this study is to better understand how the complex problem of human trafficking is addressed in international debates. How the discussion about human trafficking develops and how it is debated ultimately influences how the decision-making process unfolds. In order to
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The purpose of this study is to better understand how the complex problem of human trafficking is addressed in international debates. How the discussion about human trafficking develops and how it is debated ultimately influences how the decision-making process unfolds. In order to understand the formation of public policy and laws, therefore, it is important to study the debate that occurs prior to decision making. This analysis focuses on the narratives used by major, well-established human rights and political actors that argue for necessary actions to be undertaken—such as the formation of new policies and laws in the European Union—as an attempt to protect citizens of the EU and other regions in the world from becoming victims of trafficking networks. Our research examines how the topic of human trafficking is framed and how this framework is intertwined in the debate with other social problems. We focus on how human trafficking is discussed by two well-established human rights Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), Amnesty International (Amnesty) and Human Rights Watch (HRW), in addition to the European Parliament (EP). The research questions for this study include: (1) In what context is human trafficking discussed by the three actors? (2) How do these actors frame the definition of human trafficking in their presentations? To answer these questions, we have conducted a systematic content analysis of documents that include official statements and research reports of the NGOs, as well as resolutions and recommendations of the EP. Altogether, 240 documents were analyzed in detail. These findings indicate that the two human rights organizations, Amnesty and Human Rights Watch, along with the European Parliament, all address human trafficking as an important social problem, albeit to varying degrees. Each actor has a different method of correlating human trafficking with many other social problems, thereby emphasizing different causes and effects. In our analysis, we examine the concept of framing and, in particular, responsibility framing in order to understand the causal relationships between actors and events. The findings of this study suggest that the formation of various social policies and laws in the international political forum are deeply affected by the dynamic interrelatedness between the political issues, actors, and form and content of the debates about human trafficking that precede the formation or revision of a policy and law. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Inequality and the Global Slave Trade)
Open AccessArticle “Victims of Trafficking”: The Feminisation of Poverty and Migration in the Gendered Narratives of Human Trafficking
Societies 2014, 4(4), 532-548; doi:10.3390/soc4040532
Received: 1 April 2014 / Revised: 11 July 2014 / Accepted: 8 October 2014 / Published: 13 October 2014
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Abstract
This paper argues that the feminisation of migration has heightened the awareness of human trafficking, yet the feminisation of poverty is a social concept that is yet to be fully understood within the context of human trafficking. The false notion of “return” has
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This paper argues that the feminisation of migration has heightened the awareness of human trafficking, yet the feminisation of poverty is a social concept that is yet to be fully understood within the context of human trafficking. The false notion of “return” has been given as a solution to those individuals who are “out of place” or have been displaced as “victims of trafficking”. This article will discuss the Right to Remain visa applications of 12 women who were trafficked from post-Soviet countries to Israel, by examining the impact that gender, level of poverty and each woman’s decision to migrate has had on her life. In addition, this article will analyse the life experiences of the 12 women who experienced human trafficking. It will explore the idea that each woman is a “victim of trafficking” and that, conversely, this may be understood as a means to negate a more nuanced understanding of women’s mobility. Finally, this article will provide an intersectional analysis of trafficking flows in the world today. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Inequality and the Global Slave Trade)

Other

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Open AccessConcept Paper Socio-Economic Inequality, Human Trafficking, and the Global Slave Trade
Societies 2014, 4(2), 148-160; doi:10.3390/soc4020148
Received: 21 January 2014 / Revised: 8 April 2014 / Accepted: 21 April 2014 / Published: 28 April 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (278 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to discuss human trafficking within the broader framework of socio-economic inequality. The presence of socio-economic inequality in the world creates a system where those in power very easily dominate and take advantage of those people without power.
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The purpose of this paper is to discuss human trafficking within the broader framework of socio-economic inequality. The presence of socio-economic inequality in the world creates a system where those in power very easily dominate and take advantage of those people without power. One of the most serious contemporary effects of inequalities between and within nations is the phenomenon of global sex trade or human trafficking for the purposes of sex. Deriving from unequal power relations, human trafficking is a serious global crime that involves the exploitation of many, but mostly females and children. This paper provides an extensive discussion of inequality and its links with human trafficking as contemporary slavery. In conclusion, the paper provides a list of selected intra-national and multi-national service organizations that are adopting strategies for combating trafficking through the reduction of social and economic inequality. Implications for social welfare advocates and international collaborative efforts are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Inequality and the Global Slave Trade)

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