Special Issue "Microscale Separation and Analysis"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Christopher Palmer

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Humanities and Sciences, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: electrokinetic chromatography; polymeric nanoparticles; environmental analytical chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microscale separation and analysis has generated significant interest in recent years, due to significant advantages in analyses time and cost, sample size requirements, performance, and compatibility with detection and analysis technologies, such as mass spectrometry. The development and integration of capillary and microfluidic approaches, including pressure-driven and electro-driven capillary chromatography, electrophoresis and dielectrophoresis, electrokinetic chromatography, micro-scale extraction, and microfluidics has resulted in improvements in performance, functionality, and throughput. This Special Issue will feature recent and significant developments in microscale separation and analysis technologies.

Prof. Dr. Christopher Palmer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • micro-scale analysis
  • analytical performance
  • capillary chromatography
  • microfluidics
  • capillary electrophoresis
  • sample ereparation

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Evaluation of 5 μm Superficially Porous Particles for Capillary and Microfluidic LC Columns
Chromatography 2015, 2(3), 502-514; doi:10.3390/chromatography2030502
Received: 26 May 2015 / Revised: 10 July 2015 / Accepted: 24 July 2015 / Published: 4 August 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1286 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Large-size (4–5 µm) superficially porous particles yield lower plate heights (e.g., the minimal reduced plate height or hmin ≈ 1.5) than fully porous particles of a similar size when packed into large-bore columns. This property allows for better chromatographic performance without the
[...] Read more.
Large-size (4–5 µm) superficially porous particles yield lower plate heights (e.g., the minimal reduced plate height or hmin ≈ 1.5) than fully porous particles of a similar size when packed into large-bore columns. This property allows for better chromatographic performance without the higher pressures required for smaller particles. This study explores the use of such particles in microfluidic LC columns where materials and fitting pressure limits can constrain the size of particle used. The theoretically predicted performance improvements compared to fully porous particles were not demonstrated in capillary columns (with hmin ≈ 2 for both particle types), in agreement with previous studies that examined smaller superficially porous particles. Microfluidic columns were then compared to capillary columns. Capillary columns significantly outperformed microfluidic columns due to imperfections imposed by microfluidic channel asymmetry and world-to-chip connection at the optimal flow rate; however, superficially porous particles packed in microfluidic LC columns had flatter plate height versus flow rate curves indicating potential for better performance at high reduced velocities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microscale Separation and Analysis)
Open AccessArticle A Novel Micro Pressurized Liquid Extraction Method for Rapid Sample Preparation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Various Solids
Chromatography 2015, 2(3), 488-501; doi:10.3390/chromatography2030488
Received: 8 May 2015 / Revised: 2 July 2015 / Accepted: 24 July 2015 / Published: 3 August 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (797 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of a novel micro pressurized liquid extraction (µPLE) method for the isolation of 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from various solid samples is explored. The technique employs rapid heating in a single static extraction mode to remove analytes in
[...] Read more.
The use of a novel micro pressurized liquid extraction (µPLE) method for the isolation of 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from various solid samples is explored. The technique employs rapid heating in a single static extraction mode to remove analytes in a matter of seconds from 5–10 mg samples using only 125 µL of solvent. For example, results show that 30 s extractions with toluene at 200 °C produce respective PAH recovery ranges of 90%–130% and 88%–114% from samples of soil and smoked chicken. Comparatively, solids containing significant amounts of biochar were more challenging to extract from. For instance, when using a pure biochar sample matrix, recoveries for the 16 PAHs range from only 33%–66% after 60 s of extraction with toluene at 200 °C. Overall, these extraction results agree very well with those reported when using conventional methods on similar samples. Therefore, the findings indicate that µPLE can potentially provide an alternative sample preparation method for PAHs that is both very rapid and requires little solvent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microscale Separation and Analysis)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Separations Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Separations Edit a special issue Review for Separations
logo
loading...
Back to Top