Special Issue "Electrophoretic Analyses in Capillaries and Microfluidic Devices"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Timothy G. Strein

Department of Chemistry, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: in-capillary chemical reactions; electrophoretic stacking phenomena in CE; chiral separations with CE; bile salt micellar structure; aqueous NMR; Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC); microvoltammetric electrodes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Whether in capillaries or within channels on microfluidic chips, (bio)analytical analyses that employ voltage-driven mass transport mechanisms have become increasingly popular in the past two decades. Rapid and efficient electrophoretic analyses of nano- and sub-nanoliter volumes of sample can often be performed with analysis times in the minute to sub-minute time frame, while producing minimal waste. Moreover, the continued development of novel sample introduction and handling schemes, creative approaches to in-line sample pretreatment and concentration, the coupling of multiple-dimensional analyses, and the interfacing of electrophoretic assays with powerful and sensitive modes of detection make electro-driven analyses attractive to an increasingly broad range of scientists.

This Special Issue is intended to highlight recent developments in the use of electrically-driven analytical assays, including but not limited to CZE, CGE, MEKC, EMMA, cIEF, and ITP, performed on any platform (capillary, chip, paper, etc.). Fundamental and applied work will be equally welcome.

Prof. Dr. Timothy G. Strein
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE)
  • electrokinetic capillary chromatography (EKC)
  • sample stacking methods
  • isotachophoresis (ITP)
  • electrophoretically-mediated microanalysis (EMMA)
  • capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE)
  • chiral separations via CE
  • dielectrophoresis

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Minor Wheat Protein Fractions Analysis by Using Capillary Zone Electrophoresis
Separations 2016, 3(2), 17; doi:10.3390/separations3020017
Received: 18 January 2016 / Revised: 18 May 2016 / Accepted: 24 May 2016 / Published: 3 June 2016
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Abstract
The wheat proteins soluble in chloroform-methanol mixtures are associated with several kinds of food allergies. A separation method based on capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with UV detection was developed for the analysis of these mixtures. An acidic phosphoric acid/β-alanine (pH 2.5) buffer containing
[...] Read more.
The wheat proteins soluble in chloroform-methanol mixtures are associated with several kinds of food allergies. A separation method based on capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with UV detection was developed for the analysis of these mixtures. An acidic phosphoric acid/β-alanine (pH 2.5) buffer containing HPMC, urea and acetonitrile was used for the separation. The capillary electrophoresis (CE) was able to complete the analysis in six minutes. The electrophoregrams of extracts of both durum and common wheat commercial cultivars were compared. The registered cultivar (cv.) Kamut® was included as a representative of rustic cereal species. A different number of peaks were detected in the profile relative to the tetraploid and exaploid analyzed cultivars. Three main peaks were observed for all tetraploid cultivars, while four peaks were detected for the common wheat cultivars. The peak corresponding to the α-amylase inhibitor type III was identified in the common wheat electrophoregram. The possibility of quantitative determination of this inhibitor has been investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrophoretic Analyses in Capillaries and Microfluidic Devices)
Open AccessArticle Determination of Morphine and Its Metabolites in Human Urine by Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection Employing On-Column Labeling with a New Boronic Acid Functionalized Squarylium Cyanine Dye
Separations 2016, 3(1), 1; doi:10.3390/chromatography3010001
Received: 29 October 2015 / Revised: 1 December 2015 / Accepted: 3 December 2015 / Published: 5 January 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (832 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A novel method for the labeling and rapid separation of morphine, morphine-3-beta-d-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-beta-d-glucuronide (M6G) in human urine employing a new boronic acid functionalized squarylium dye (SQ-BA3) and capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) is described.
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A novel method for the labeling and rapid separation of morphine, morphine-3-beta-d-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-beta-d-glucuronide (M6G) in human urine employing a new boronic acid functionalized squarylium dye (SQ-BA3) and capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) is described. The spectrochemical properties, solution stability, pH range, and mechanisms for interactions with morphine and its metabolites were first established for SQ-BA3, followed by optimization of an on-column labeling procedure and CE-LIF method. SQ-BA3 itself was shown to be unstable and weakly fluorescent in aqueous buffers due to aggregate formation. However, SQ-BA3 showed a relative stability and dramatic increase in fluorescence intensity upon the addition of morphine, M3G, and M6G. Because of the low background fluorescence of this dye, on-column labeling was feasible, leading to a simple and rapid analytical method with the potential for clinical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrophoretic Analyses in Capillaries and Microfluidic Devices)
Open AccessArticle Field-Amplified Sample Injection-Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography for the Determination of Benzophenones in Food Simulants
Chromatography 2015, 2(3), 452-471; doi:10.3390/chromatography2030452
Received: 15 June 2015 / Revised: 13 July 2015 / Accepted: 14 July 2015 / Published: 20 July 2015
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Abstract
A field-amplified sample injection-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (FASI-MEKC) method for the determination of 14 benzophenones (BPs) in a food simulant used in migration studies of food packaging materials was developed, allowing almost baseline separation in less than 21 min. The use of a 10
[...] Read more.
A field-amplified sample injection-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (FASI-MEKC) method for the determination of 14 benzophenones (BPs) in a food simulant used in migration studies of food packaging materials was developed, allowing almost baseline separation in less than 21 min. The use of a 10 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution as sample matrix was mandatory to achieve FASI enhancement of the analyzed BPs. A 21- to 784-fold sensitivity enhancement was achieved with FASI-MEKC, obtaining limits of detection down to 5.1–68.4 µg/L, with acceptable run-to-run precisions (RSD values lower than 22.3%) and accuracy (relative errors lower than 21.0%). Method performance was evaluated by quantifying BPs in the food simulant spiked at 500 µg/L (bellow the established specific migration limit for BP (600 µg/L) by EU legislation). For a 95% confidence level, no statistical differences were observed between found and spiked concentrations (probability at the confidence level, p value, of 0.55), showing that the proposed FASI-MEKC method is suitable for the analysis of BPs in food packaging migration studies at the levels established by EU legislation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrophoretic Analyses in Capillaries and Microfluidic Devices)

Review

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Open AccessReview Exploring Gradients in Electrophoretic Separation and Preconcentration on Miniaturized Devices
Separations 2016, 3(2), 12; doi:10.3390/separations3020012
Received: 14 December 2015 / Revised: 22 February 2016 / Accepted: 2 March 2016 / Published: 1 April 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2935 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Over the last two decades, miniaturization, integration, and automation have made microfluidic systems popular. Core to advances in microfluidics are numerous electrophoretic separation and preconcentration strategies, some finding their origins on bench-top systems. Among them, gradient-based strategies are especially effective in addressing sensitivity
[...] Read more.
Over the last two decades, miniaturization, integration, and automation have made microfluidic systems popular. Core to advances in microfluidics are numerous electrophoretic separation and preconcentration strategies, some finding their origins on bench-top systems. Among them, gradient-based strategies are especially effective in addressing sensitivity challenges. This review introduces several gradient-based techniques according to a broad definition, including conductivity, field, and concentration, organized by the method of gradient generation. Each technique is introduced and described, and recent seminal advances explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrophoretic Analyses in Capillaries and Microfluidic Devices)
Figures

Open AccessReview Recent Advances in Portable Analytical Electromigration Devices
Separations 2016, 3(1), 2; doi:10.3390/chromatography3010002
Received: 19 November 2015 / Revised: 16 December 2015 / Accepted: 18 December 2015 / Published: 5 January 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2394 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article presents an overview of recent advances in the field of portable capillary electrophoresis and microchip electrophoresis equipment during the period 2013–Mid 2015. Instrumental achievements in the separation as well as the detection part of the equipment are discussed. Several applications from
[...] Read more.
This article presents an overview of recent advances in the field of portable capillary electrophoresis and microchip electrophoresis equipment during the period 2013–Mid 2015. Instrumental achievements in the separation as well as the detection part of the equipment are discussed. Several applications from a variety of fields are described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrophoretic Analyses in Capillaries and Microfluidic Devices)

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