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Special Issue "State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Denmark"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "State-of-the-Art Sensors Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 July 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jørgen Kjems

Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, C.F. Mollers Alle, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
E-Mail
Phone: +45 28992086
Interests: RNA and protein biochemistry; RNA splicing; RNA interference; siRNA delivery and therapeutic applications; aptamer technology; miRNA analysis; eukaryotic cell biology; viruses; gene expression control; fluorescence techniques in cell biology; biosensors; bioimaging; DNA; RNA and protein based nanotechnologies

Keywords

  • biosensors
  • chemical sensors
  • physical sensors
  • remote sensing sensors

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes
Sensors 2010, 10(12), 10986-11000; doi:10.3390/s101210986
Received: 20 October 2010 / Revised: 22 November 2010 / Accepted: 25 November 2010 / Published: 3 December 2010
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (725 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to
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Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Denmark)
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Open AccessArticle Fabrication and Characterization of 3D Micro- and Nanoelectrodes for Neuron Recordings
Sensors 2010, 10(11), 10339-10355; doi:10.3390/s101110339
Received: 18 October 2010 / Revised: 28 October 2010 / Accepted: 15 November 2010 / Published: 17 November 2010
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (917 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper we discuss the fabrication and characterization of three dimensional (3D) micro- and nanoelectrodes with the goal of using them for extra- and intracellular studies. Two different types of electrodes will be described: high aspect ratio microelectrodes for studying the communication
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In this paper we discuss the fabrication and characterization of three dimensional (3D) micro- and nanoelectrodes with the goal of using them for extra- and intracellular studies. Two different types of electrodes will be described: high aspect ratio microelectrodes for studying the communication between cells and ultimately for brain slice recordings and small nanoelectrodes for highly localized measurements and ultimately for intracellular studies. Electrical and electrochemical characterization of these electrodes as well as the results of PC12 cell differentiation on chip will be presented and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Denmark)
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Open AccessArticle Metaphase FISH on a Chip: Miniaturized Microfluidic Device for Fluorescence in situ Hybridization
Sensors 2010, 10(11), 9831-9846; doi:10.3390/s101109831
Received: 2 August 2010 / Revised: 23 September 2010 / Accepted: 15 October 2010 / Published: 2 November 2010
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (411 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) is a major cytogenetic technique for clinical genetic diagnosis of both inherited and acquired chromosomal abnormalities. Although FISH techniques have evolved and are often used together with other cytogenetic methods like CGH, PRINS and PNA-FISH, the process continues
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Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) is a major cytogenetic technique for clinical genetic diagnosis of both inherited and acquired chromosomal abnormalities. Although FISH techniques have evolved and are often used together with other cytogenetic methods like CGH, PRINS and PNA-FISH, the process continues to be a manual, labour intensive, expensive and time consuming technique, often taking over 3–5 days, even in dedicated labs. We have developed a novel microFISH device to perform metaphase FISH on a chip which overcomes many shortcomings of the current laboratory protocols. This work also introduces a novel splashing device for preparing metaphase spreads on a microscope glass slide, followed by a rapid adhesive tape-based bonding protocol leading to rapid fabrication of the microFISH device. The microFISH device allows for an optimized metaphase FISH protocol on a chip with over a 20-fold reduction in the reagent volume. This is the first demonstration of metaphase FISH on a microfluidic device and offers a possibility of automation and significant cost reduction of many routine diagnostic tests of genetic anomalies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Denmark)
Open AccessArticle Novel Designs for Application Specific MEMS Pressure Sensors
Sensors 2010, 10(11), 9541-9563; doi:10.3390/s101109541
Received: 2 August 2010 / Revised: 25 September 2010 / Accepted: 20 October 2010 / Published: 28 October 2010
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (1954 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the framework of developing innovative microfabricated pressure sensors, we present here three designs based on different readout principles, each one tailored for a specific application. A touch mode capacitive pressure sensor with high sensitivity (14 pF/bar), low temperature dependence and high capacitive
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In the framework of developing innovative microfabricated pressure sensors, we present here three designs based on different readout principles, each one tailored for a specific application. A touch mode capacitive pressure sensor with high sensitivity (14 pF/bar), low temperature dependence and high capacitive output signal (more than 100 pF) is depicted. An optical pressure sensor intrinsically immune to electromagnetic interference, with large pressure range (0–350 bar) and a sensitivity of 1 pm/bar is presented. Finally, a resonating wireless pressure sensor power source free with a sensitivity of 650 KHz/mmHg is described. These sensors will be related with their applications in  harsh environment, distributed systems and medical environment, respectively. For many aspects, commercially available sensors, which in vast majority are piezoresistive, are not suited for the applications proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Denmark)
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Open AccessArticle Refractive Index Sensor Based on a 1D Photonic Crystal in a Microfluidic Channel
Sensors 2010, 10(3), 2348-2358; doi:10.3390/s100302348
Received: 27 January 2010 / Revised: 10 February 2010 / Accepted: 5 March 2010 / Published: 22 March 2010
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (1313 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A refractive index sensor has been fabricated in silicon oxynitride by standard UV lithography and dry etching processes. The refractive index sensor consists of a 1D photonic crystal (PhC) embedded in a microfluidic channel addressed by fiber-terminated planar waveguides. Experimental demonstrations performed with
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A refractive index sensor has been fabricated in silicon oxynitride by standard UV lithography and dry etching processes. The refractive index sensor consists of a 1D photonic crystal (PhC) embedded in a microfluidic channel addressed by fiber-terminated planar waveguides. Experimental demonstrations performed with several ethanol solutions ranging from a purity of 96.00% (n = 1.36356) to 95.04% (n = 1.36377) yielded a sensitivity (Δλ/Δn) of 836 nm/RIU and a limit of detection (LOD) of 6 x 10-5 RIU, which is, however, still one order of magnitude higher than the theoretical lower limit of the limit of detection 1.3 x 10–6 RIU. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Denmark)

Review

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Open AccessReview Sensing-Applications of Surface-Based Single Vesicle Arrays
Sensors 2010, 10(12), 11352-11368; doi:10.3390/s101211352
Received: 23 October 2010 / Revised: 30 November 2010 / Accepted: 7 December 2010 / Published: 13 December 2010
Cited by 24 | PDF Full-text (1718 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A single lipid vesicle can be regarded as an autonomous ultra-miniaturised 3D biomimetic “scaffold” (Ø ≥ 13 nm) ideally suited for reconstitution and interrogation of biochemical processes. The enclosing lipid bilayer membrane of a vesicle can be applied for studying binding (protein/lipid or
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A single lipid vesicle can be regarded as an autonomous ultra-miniaturised 3D biomimetic “scaffold” (Ø ≥ 13 nm) ideally suited for reconstitution and interrogation of biochemical processes. The enclosing lipid bilayer membrane of a vesicle can be applied for studying binding (protein/lipid or receptor/ligand interactions) or transmembrane events (membrane permeability or ion channel activation) while the aqueous vesicle lumen can be used for confining few or single macromolecules and probe, e.g., protein folding, catalytic pathways of enzymes or more complex biochemical reactions, such as signal transduction cascades. Immobilisation (arraying) of single vesicles on a solid support is an extremely useful technique that allows detailed characterisation of vesicle preparations using surface sensitive techniques, in particular fluorescence microscopy. Surface-based single vesicle arrays allow a plethora of prototypic sensing applications in a high throughput format with high spatial and high temporal resolution. In this review we present a series of applications of single vesicle arrays for screening/sensing of: membrane curvature dependent protein-lipid interactions, bilayer tension, reactions triggered in the vesicle lumen, the activity of transmembrane protein channels and biological membrane fusion reactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Denmark)
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