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Special Issue "State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Austria"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "State-of-the-Art Sensors Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Franz L. Dickert (Website1, Website2)

Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Strasse 38, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Phone: +43-1-4277-52317
Fax: +431 4277 9520
Interests: chemical sensors; physical sensors; metrology; supramolecular chemistry; molecular imprinting; molecular recognition; intermolecular interactions; anisotropic phases; physicochemical basis of sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this special issue is to provide a comprehensive view on the state-of-the-art sensors technology in Austria. Research articles are solicited which will provide a consolidated state-of-the-art in this area. The Special Issue will publish those full research, review and high rated manuscripts addressing the above topic.

Prof. Dr. Franz Dickert
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • biosensors
  • chemical sensors
  • physical sensors
  • remote sensing sensors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle QCM-Arrays for Sensing Terpenes in Fresh and Dried Herbs via Bio-Mimetic MIP Layers
Sensors 2010, 10(7), 6361-6376; doi:10.3390/s100706361
Received: 10 May 2010 / Revised: 25 May 2010 / Accepted: 15 June 2010 / Published: 28 June 2010
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (470 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A piezoelectric 10 MHz multichannel quartz crystal microbalance (MQCM), coated with six molecularly imprinted polystyrene artificial recognition membranes have been developed for selective quantification of terpenes emanated from fresh and dried Lamiaceae family species, i.e., rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinalis L.), [...] Read more.
A piezoelectric 10 MHz multichannel quartz crystal microbalance (MQCM), coated with six molecularly imprinted polystyrene artificial recognition membranes have been developed for selective quantification of terpenes emanated from fresh and dried Lamiaceae family species, i.e., rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinalis L.), basil (Ocimum Basilicum) and sage (Salvia Officinalis). Optimal e-nose parameters, such as layer heights (1–6 KHz), sensitivity Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Austria)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology
Sensors 2010, 10(6), 5724-5757; doi:10.3390/s100605724
Received: 3 March 2010 / Revised: 2 April 2010 / Accepted: 17 May 2010 / Published: 8 June 2010
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3169 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and [...] Read more.
Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Austria)
Open AccessArticle On the Use of Piezoelectric Sensors in Structural Mechanics: Some Novel Strategies
Sensors 2010, 10(6), 5626-5641; doi:10.3390/s100605626
Received: 30 March 2010 / Revised: 26 April 2010 / Accepted: 27 April 2010 / Published: 3 June 2010
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the present paper, a review on piezoelectric sensing of mechanical deformations and vibrations of so-called smart or intelligent structures is given. After a short introduction into piezoelectric sensing and actuation of such controlled structures, we pay special emphasis on the description [...] Read more.
In the present paper, a review on piezoelectric sensing of mechanical deformations and vibrations of so-called smart or intelligent structures is given. After a short introduction into piezoelectric sensing and actuation of such controlled structures, we pay special emphasis on the description of some own work, which has been performed at the Institute of Technical Mechanics of the Johannes Kepler University of Linz (JKU) in the last years. Among other aspects, this work has been motivated by the fact that collocated control of smart structures requires a sensor output that is work-conjugated to the input by the actuator. This fact in turn brings into the play the more general question of how to measure mechanically meaningful structural quantities, such as displacements, slopes, or other quantities, which form the work-conjugated quantities of the actuation, by means piezoelectric sensors. At least in the range of small strains, there is confidence that distributed piezoelectric sensors or sensor patches in smart structures do measure weighted integrals over their domain. Therefore, there is a need of distributing or shaping the sensor activity in order to be able to re-interpret the sensor signals in the desired mechanical sense. We sketch a general strategy that is based on a special application of work principles, more generally on displacement virials. We also review our work in the past on bringing this concept to application in smart structures, such as beams, rods and plates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Austria)
Open AccessArticle An Overview of Recent Application of Medical Infrared Thermography in Sports Medicine in Austria
Sensors 2010, 10(5), 4700-4715; doi:10.3390/s100504700
Received: 10 March 2010 / Revised: 2 April 2010 / Accepted: 20 April 2010 / Published: 7 May 2010
Cited by 37 | PDF Full-text (456 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Medical infrared thermography (MIT) is used for analyzing physiological functions related to skin temperature. Technological advances have made MIT a reliable medical measurement tool. This paper provides an overview of MIT´s technical requirements and usefulness in sports medicine, with a special focus [...] Read more.
Medical infrared thermography (MIT) is used for analyzing physiological functions related to skin temperature. Technological advances have made MIT a reliable medical measurement tool. This paper provides an overview of MIT´s technical requirements and usefulness in sports medicine, with a special focus on overuse and traumatic knee injuries. Case studies are used to illustrate the clinical applicability and limitations of MIT. It is concluded that MIT is a non-invasive, non-radiating, low cost detection tool which should be applied for pre-scanning athletes in sports medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Austria)

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