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Special Issue "Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Biological and Chemical Sensors"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Andrea M. Armani (Website)

Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, VHE 712, University of Southern California, 3651 Watt Way, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
Interests: photonic devices and sensors; nanophotonic integrated sensors; non linear integrated optics; hybrid material systems; organic and inorganic optical materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Heather K. Hunt (Website)

Department of Bioengineering, University of Missouri, 240G Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center, 1201 Rollins St., Columbia, MO 65211-7310, USA
Phone: 573-882-8202
Interests: chemical sensors; environmental monitoring; optoelectronics; responsive materials; nanostructured materials; surface chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The combination of organic and inorganic materials with integrated devices is enabling a wide range of applications, from telecommunications to biological and chemical sensing. One of the reasons for this broad impact is the diversity of available materials, which allows researchers to develop devices with previously unachievable performance and characteristics. The aim of this special issue is to highlight many of these novel devices, focusing on applications in biological and chemical sensing. Papers addressing advances in sensing technologies as well as innovative materials systems are sought, including but not limited to the following areas: sensor devices and sensing systems for medical and environmental detection; organic and inorganic materials for sensing; novel approaches for biological and chemical detection; and innovative surface functionalization schemes.

Both review articles and original research papers relating to the application of organic/inorganic materials in sensors and transducers are solicited. There is particular interest in papers that describe enabling materials for sensing systems and devices.

Prof. Dr. Andrea M. Armani
Prof. Dr. Heather K. Hunt
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • biological sensors
  • chemical sensors
  • environmental monitoring
  • surface chemistry
  • organic materials
  • inorganic materials
  • responsive materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Electrochemical Determination of Glycoalkaloids Using a Carbon Nanotubes-Phenylboronic Acid Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode
Sensors 2013, 13(12), 16234-16244; doi:10.3390/s131216234
Received: 5 October 2013 / Revised: 12 November 2013 / Accepted: 18 November 2013 / Published: 27 November 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (370 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A versatile strategy for electrochemical determination of glycoalkaloids (GAs) was developed by using a carbon nanotubes-phenylboronic acid (CNTs-PBA) modified glassy carbon electrode. PBA reacts with α-solanine and α-chaconine to form a cyclic ester, which could be utilized to detect GAs. This method [...] Read more.
A versatile strategy for electrochemical determination of glycoalkaloids (GAs) was developed by using a carbon nanotubes-phenylboronic acid (CNTs-PBA) modified glassy carbon electrode. PBA reacts with α-solanine and α-chaconine to form a cyclic ester, which could be utilized to detect GAs. This method allowed GA detection from 1 μM to 28 μM and the detection limit was 0.3 μM. Affinity interaction of GAs and immobilized PBA caused an essential change of the peak current. The CNT-PBA modified electrodes were sensitive for detection of GAs, and the peak current values were in quite good agreement with those measured by the sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Biological and Chemical Sensors)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Hybrid Integrated Label-Free Chemical and Biological Sensors
Sensors 2014, 14(4), 5890-5928; doi:10.3390/s140405890
Received: 11 February 2014 / Revised: 10 March 2014 / Accepted: 14 March 2014 / Published: 26 March 2014
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (1030 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Label-free sensors based on electrical, mechanical and optical transduction methods have potential applications in numerous areas of society, ranging from healthcare to environmental monitoring. Initial research in the field focused on the development and optimization of various sensor platforms fabricated from a [...] Read more.
Label-free sensors based on electrical, mechanical and optical transduction methods have potential applications in numerous areas of society, ranging from healthcare to environmental monitoring. Initial research in the field focused on the development and optimization of various sensor platforms fabricated from a single material system, such as fiber-based optical sensors and silicon nanowire-based electrical sensors. However, more recent research efforts have explored designing sensors fabricated from multiple materials. For example, synthetic materials and/or biomaterials can also be added to the sensor to improve its response toward analytes of interest. By leveraging the properties of the different material systems, these hybrid sensing devices can have significantly improved performance over their single-material counterparts (better sensitivity, specificity, signal to noise, and/or detection limits). This review will briefly discuss some of the methods for creating these multi-material sensor platforms and the advances enabled by this design approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Biological and Chemical Sensors)
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Open AccessReview Conducting Polymer-Based Nanohybrid Transducers: A Potential Route to High Sensitivity and Selectivity Sensors
Sensors 2014, 14(2), 3604-3630; doi:10.3390/s140203604
Received: 15 January 2014 / Revised: 11 February 2014 / Accepted: 12 February 2014 / Published: 20 February 2014
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (1588 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The development of novel sensing materials provides good opportunities to realize previously unachievable sensor performance. In this review, conducting polymer-based nanohybrids are highlighted as innovative transducers for high-performance chemical and biological sensing devices. Synthetic strategies of the nanohybrids are categorized into four [...] Read more.
The development of novel sensing materials provides good opportunities to realize previously unachievable sensor performance. In this review, conducting polymer-based nanohybrids are highlighted as innovative transducers for high-performance chemical and biological sensing devices. Synthetic strategies of the nanohybrids are categorized into four groups: (1) impregnation, followed by reduction; (2) concurrent redox reactions; (3) electrochemical deposition; (4) seeding approach. Nanocale hybridization of conducting polymers with inorganic components can lead to improved sorption, catalytic reaction and/or transport behavior of the material systems. The nanohybrids have thus been used to detect nerve agents, toxic gases, volatile organic compounds, glucose, dopamine, and DNA. Given further advances in nanohybrids synthesis, it is expected that sensor technology will also evolve, especially in terms of sensitivity and selectivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Biological and Chemical Sensors)
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