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Special Issue "Carbon Paste Electrodes"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2005)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jiri Barek

UNESCO Laboratory of Environmental Electrochemistry, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Charles University, 128 43 Prague 2, Czech Republic

Special Issue Information

Submission

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Keywords

Carbon Paste Electrodes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Brain Tissue Oxygen: In Vivo Monitoring with Carbon Paste Electrodes
Sensors 2005, 5(11), 473-487; doi:10.3390/s5110473
Received: 28 April 2005 / Accepted: 1 July 2005 / Published: 16 November 2005
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (242 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this communication we review selected experiments involving the use ofcarbon paste electrodes (CPEs) to monitor and measure brain tissue O2 levels in awakefreely-moving animals. Simultaneous measurements of rCBF were performed using the H2clearance technique. Voltammetric techniques used include [...] Read more.
In this communication we review selected experiments involving the use ofcarbon paste electrodes (CPEs) to monitor and measure brain tissue O2 levels in awakefreely-moving animals. Simultaneous measurements of rCBF were performed using the H2clearance technique. Voltammetric techniques used include both differential pulse (O2) andconstant potential amperometry (rCBF). Mild hypoxia and hyperoxia produced rapidchanges (decrease and increase respectively) in the in vivo O2 signal. Neuronal activation(tail pinch and stimulated grooming) produced similar increases in both O2 and rCBFindicating that CPE O2 currents provide an index of increases in rCBF when such increasesexceed O2 utilization. Saline injection produced a transient increase in the O2 signal whilechloral hydrate produced slower more long-lasting changes that accompanied the behavioralchanges associated with anaesthesia. Acetazolamide increased O2 levels through an increasein rCBF. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Paste Electrodes)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Long-Term Monitoring of Brain Dopamine Metabolism In Vivo with Carbon Paste Electrodes
Sensors 2005, 5(6), 317-342; doi:10.3390/s5060317
Received: 4 April 2005 / Accepted: 28 April 2005 / Published: 14 November 2005
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (207 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This review focuses on the stability of voltammetric signals recorded overperiods of months with carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) implanted in the brain. The keyinteraction underlying this stability is between the pasting oil and brain lipids that arecapable of inhibiting the fouling caused [...] Read more.
This review focuses on the stability of voltammetric signals recorded overperiods of months with carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) implanted in the brain. The keyinteraction underlying this stability is between the pasting oil and brain lipids that arecapable of inhibiting the fouling caused by proteins. In brain regions receiving a significantdopaminergic input, a peak due to the methylated metabolites of dopamine, principallyhomovanillic acid (HVA), is clearly resolved using slow sweep voltammetry. Although anumber of factors limit the time resolution for monitoring brain HVA concentrationdynamics, the stability of CPEs allows investigations of long-term effects of drugs, as wellas behavioral studies, not possible using other in-vivo monitoring techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Paste Electrodes)

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