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Special Issue "Gas Sensors Based on the Field Effect"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Mats Eriksson

Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +46 (0)13 281252
Interests: chemical sensors; electrochemical sensors; field-effect devices; scanning light pulse technique; surface and interface physics; catalytic reactions; thin film physics and semiconductor physics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gas sensors based on the field effect, in particular field effect transistors, can be used in a wide range of applications. They are well known for sensitive and selective detection of hydrogen and ammonia, but are also designed to sense many other gases and gas mixtures. Originally based on silicon as the semiconductor, silicon dioxide as the insulator and precious metals as gate materials, field effect gas sensors today come in a wide variety of materials and structures. Use of nanostructured materials, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, in the gate of field effect devices is one such trend. The use of wide bandgap materials for the semiconductor part is another. Applying temperature modulation is also a way to extend the sensing capabilities.

The aim of this special issue is to bring together innovative applications of field effect gas sensors, new sensor materials and sensor designs, as well as basic investigations of response mechanisms. Both review articles and original research papers relating to gas sensing with field effect devices are welcome. Papers concerning applications and/or measurement conditions where field effect gas sensors have properties that exceed those of other gas sensor technologies are of particular interest.

Dr. Mats Eriksson
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • field effect
  • gas sensor
  • chemFET
  • wide bandgap field effect devices
  • high temperature sensing
  • hydrogen sensing
  • ammonia sensing
  • temperature modulation
  • response mechanism
  • field effect transistor
  • field effect capacitor
  • schottky diode

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Comparative Study of the Gas Sensing Behavior in P3HT- and PBTTT-Based OTFTs: The Influence of Film Morphology and Contact Electrode Position
Sensors 2014, 14(9), 16869-16880; doi:10.3390/s140916869
Received: 2 July 2014 / Revised: 11 August 2014 / Accepted: 2 September 2014 / Published: 11 September 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (12308 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bottom- and top-contact organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) were fabricated, using poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene] (PBTTT-C16) as p-type channel semiconductors. Four different types of OTFTs were fabricated and investigated as gas sensors against three volatile organic compounds, with different associated dipole moments.
[...] Read more.
Bottom- and top-contact organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) were fabricated, using poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene] (PBTTT-C16) as p-type channel semiconductors. Four different types of OTFTs were fabricated and investigated as gas sensors against three volatile organic compounds, with different associated dipole moments. The OTFT-based sensor responses were evaluated with static and transient current measurements. A comparison between the different architectures and the relative organic semiconductor was made. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Sensors Based on the Field Effect)
Open AccessArticle Achieving a Good Life Time in a Vertical-Organic-Diode Gas Sensor
Sensors 2014, 14(9), 16287-16295; doi:10.3390/s140916287
Received: 15 June 2014 / Revised: 7 August 2014 / Accepted: 26 August 2014 / Published: 2 September 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4514 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, we investigate the keys to obtain a sensitive ammonia sensor with high air stability by using a low-cost polythiophene diode with a vertical channel and a porous top electrode. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and air-stable poly(5,5'-bis(3-dodecyl-2-thienyl)-2,2'-bithiophene) (PQT-12) are both evaluated as the
[...] Read more.
In this study, we investigate the keys to obtain a sensitive ammonia sensor with high air stability by using a low-cost polythiophene diode with a vertical channel and a porous top electrode. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and air-stable poly(5,5'-bis(3-dodecyl-2-thienyl)-2,2'-bithiophene) (PQT-12) are both evaluated as the active sensing layer. Two-dimensional current simulation reveals that the proposed device exhibits numerous connected vertical nanometer junctions (VNJ). Due to the de-doping reaction between ammonia molecules and the bulk current flowing through the vertical channel, both PQT-12 and P3HT VNJ-diodes exhibit detection limits of 50-ppb ammonia. The P3HT VNJ-diode, however, becomes unstable after being stored in air for two days. On the contrary, the PQT-12 VNJ-diode keeps an almost unchanged response to 50-ppb ammonia after being stored in air for 25 days. The improved storage lifetime of an organic-semiconductor-based gas sensor in air is successfully demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Sensors Based on the Field Effect)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Gas Sensors Based on Semiconducting Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors
Sensors 2014, 14(9), 17406-17429; doi:10.3390/s140917406
Received: 29 June 2014 / Revised: 23 July 2014 / Accepted: 28 July 2014 / Published: 17 September 2014
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (3250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are unique sensing materials for the fabrication of gas sensors. In this article, gas sensors based on semiconducting nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) are comprehensively reviewed. Individual nanowires or nanowire network films are usually used as the active detecting channels. In
[...] Read more.
One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are unique sensing materials for the fabrication of gas sensors. In this article, gas sensors based on semiconducting nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) are comprehensively reviewed. Individual nanowires or nanowire network films are usually used as the active detecting channels. In these sensors, a third electrode, which serves as the gate, is used to tune the carrier concentration of the nanowires to realize better sensing performance, including sensitivity, selectivity and response time, etc. The FET parameters can be modulated by the presence of the target gases and their change relate closely to the type and concentration of the gas molecules. In addition, extra controls such as metal decoration, local heating and light irradiation can be combined with the gate electrode to tune the nanowire channel and realize more effective gas sensing. With the help of micro-fabrication techniques, these sensors can be integrated into smart systems. Finally, some challenges for the future investigation and application of nanowire field-effect gas sensors are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Sensors Based on the Field Effect)
Figures

Open AccessReview One-Dimensional Nanostructure Field-Effect Sensors for Gas Detection
Sensors 2014, 14(8), 13999-14020; doi:10.3390/s140813999
Received: 18 June 2014 / Revised: 29 June 2014 / Accepted: 15 July 2014 / Published: 31 July 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (4866 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recently; one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure field-effect transistors (FETs) have attracted much attention because of their potential application in gas sensing. Micro/nanoscaled field-effect sensors combine the advantages of 1D nanostructures and the characteristic of field modulation. 1D nanostructures provide a large surface area-volume ratio; which
[...] Read more.
Recently; one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure field-effect transistors (FETs) have attracted much attention because of their potential application in gas sensing. Micro/nanoscaled field-effect sensors combine the advantages of 1D nanostructures and the characteristic of field modulation. 1D nanostructures provide a large surface area-volume ratio; which is an outstanding advantage for gas sensors with high sensitivity and fast response. In addition; the nature of the single crystals is favorable for the studies of the response mechanism. On the other hand; one main merit of the field-effect sensors is to provide an extra gate electrode to realize the current modulation; so that the sensitivity can be dramatically enhanced by changing the conductivity when operating the sensors in the subthreshold regime. This article reviews the recent developments in the field of 1D nanostructure FET for gas detection. The sensor configuration; the performance as well as their sensing mechanism are evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Sensors Based on the Field Effect)
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