Special Issue "Practicing Buddhism through Film"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 June 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francisca Cho

Theology Department, Georgetown University, PO Box 571135, 120 New North, Washington, DC 20057-1135, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 202 276-8354
Fax: +1 202 6878000
Interests: Buddhism; science; aesthetics; philosophy of language; philosophy of mind

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This issue will consider the ways in which film can function in the manner of traditional Buddhist ritual practices. Ritual practice is defined here as the production of insight into Buddhist truths and the performance of Buddhist soteriological goals. While films that depict Buddhist monastics and/or lend themselves to illustrating Buddhist concepts are useful, the aim of this issue is to examine how cinema itself functions as Buddhist religious practice. Such investigation can focus on the process of filmmaking, the experience of watching films, and/or the phenomenology of cinema in its liminal status between reality and illusion.

I invite you to submit articles on any category of film—feature movies, documentaries, art films—that consider the manner in which the medium of cinema extends and reprises Buddhist religious practices. Much of the literature on Buddhism and film to date demonstrates how Buddhist themes can be applied to the interpretation of feature films. The aim of this issue is to pay more attention to the cinematic aspects of selected films in parallel to Buddhist ritual experiences and Buddhist understandings of the imaginary nature of lived experience.

Prof. Dr. Francisca Cho
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ritual
  • imagination
  • contemplation
  • insight
  • illusion

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Khyentse Norbu’s Film Travelers and Magicians: Experiencing Impermanence, No Self, and Emptiness
Religions 2018, 9(4), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9040124
Received: 13 March 2018 / Revised: 30 March 2018 / Accepted: 3 April 2018 / Published: 11 April 2018
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Abstract
This article examines the filmmaking of writer and director Khyentse Norbu (Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche), a Tibetan-Bhutanese lama with major responsibilities as a senior Vajrayana teacher, and recognized as the third incarnation of the founder of the non-sectarian Khyentse lineage. Focusing particularly on
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This article examines the filmmaking of writer and director Khyentse Norbu (Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche), a Tibetan-Bhutanese lama with major responsibilities as a senior Vajrayana teacher, and recognized as the third incarnation of the founder of the non-sectarian Khyentse lineage. Focusing particularly on his film Travelers and Magicians (2003), the article explores how Khyentse Norbu creates an experience of Buddhist seeing: an experience of impermanence [anitya], no self [anātma], dependent arising [pratītyasamutpāda], and emptiness [śūnyatā]. The filmmaker draws the audience into worlds that appear to exist and not exist, shaped as they are by these interrelated Buddhist realities. Moving back and forth between a frame story and its embedded narratives, the film invites the viewer to experience the emotional turmoil of two protagonists as emotions shape and re-shape their behavior and influence the actions of those around them. Identifying with the protagonists in Travelers and Magicians, the audience experiences the Buddhist perception that life is a myriad of mutually dependent realities: the powerful reality of illusion and the illusory nature of reality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Practicing Buddhism through Film)
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