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Special Issue "Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications"

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A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Werner Blau (Website)

School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
Phone: 353 1 896 1708
Fax: +353 1 8962151

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanocarbon occurs in six different basic forms: graphene, graphite, fullerenes, nanodiamond, nanotubes and nanocones. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes about two decades ago by Sumino Iijima, steady scientific and technological progress on numerous  aspects of research related to synthesis, purification, structure, properties and applications has been observed, as is typical for any new and novel material. The properties of nanotubes are truly remarkable as a result of their unusual one-dimensional structure. This results in numerous superior physical and chemical properties, such as strongest mechanical strength, highest thermal conductivity, extraordinary electrical conductivity, room temperature ballistic quantum conductance and super surface functionality. At this stage, research on carbon nanotube applications spans a wide variety of sectors, ranging from composite materials, nanoelectronics, flat panel displays, sensors, and nanomedical devices to novel instrumentation. This special issue will provide a timely and comprehensive overview of the state of Nanocarbon materials and their applications, with particular focus on Carbon Nanotubes.

Prof. Dr. Werner Blau
Guest Editor

Keywords

Topics covered will include:

  • Nanocarbons - Graphene, Graphite, Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Fibers and Fullerenes
  • Functionalisation – Covalent and Non-Covalent, Dispersion, Nanocomposites
  • Nanotube Growth – Arc Discharge, Laser Ablation, CVD, Growth Mechanisms
  • Characterization – Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy, Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy, Raman, Optical Absorption and Photoluminescence
  • Properties – Mechanical, Electrical, Thermal, Optical, Electrochemical, Toxicity and Environmental Impact
  • Applications in Chemistry, Electronics, Photonics, Optoelectronics, Energy, Biomedicine, Actuation, Aerospace, etc.

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Selective Grafting of Primary Amines onto Carbon Nanotubes via Free-Radical Treatment in Microwave Plasma Post-Discharge
Polymers 2012, 4(1), 296-315; doi:10.3390/polym4010296
Received: 1 December 2011 / Revised: 6 January 2012 / Accepted: 10 January 2012 / Published: 30 January 2012
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (662 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A novel strategy to graft functional groups at the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is discussed. Aiming at grafting nitrogen containing groups, and more specifically primary amine covalent functionalization, CNTs were exposed under atomic nitrogen flow arising from an Ar + N [...] Read more.
A novel strategy to graft functional groups at the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is discussed. Aiming at grafting nitrogen containing groups, and more specifically primary amine covalent functionalization, CNTs were exposed under atomic nitrogen flow arising from an Ar + N2 microwave plasma. The primary amine functions were identified and quantified through chemical derivatization with 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzaldehyde and characterized through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The increase of the selectivity in the primary amines grafting onto CNTs, up to 66.7% for treatment of CNT powder, was performed via the reduction of post-treatment oxygen contamination and the addition of hydrogen in the experimental set-up, more particularly in the plasma post-discharge chamber. The analyses of nitrogenated and primary amine functions grafting on the CNT surface suggest that atomic nitrogen (N•) and reduced nitrogen species (NH• and NH2•) react preferentially with defect sites of CNTs and, then, only atomic nitrogen continues to react on the CNT surface, creating defects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Microscopic and Spectroscopic Investigation of Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Interaction with Carbon Nanotubes
Polymers 2011, 3(3), 1433-1446; doi:10.3390/polym3031433
Received: 7 June 2011 / Revised: 13 July 2011 / Accepted: 24 August 2011 / Published: 29 August 2011
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (1570 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The inclusion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix has been proposed to enhance the polymer’s physical and electrical properties. In this study, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate the interaction between poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and nanotubes and the reciprocal modification of [...] Read more.
The inclusion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix has been proposed to enhance the polymer’s physical and electrical properties. In this study, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate the interaction between poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and nanotubes and the reciprocal modification of physical properties. The presence of P3HT-covered nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix has been observed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Then, the modification of P3HT optical properties due to nanotube inclusion has been evidenced with spectroscopic techniques like absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The study is completed with detailed nanoscale analysis by scanning probe techniques. The ordered self assembly of polymer adhering on the nanotube is unveiled by showing an example of helical wrapping of P3HT. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy study provides information on the electronic structure of nanotube-polymer assembly, revealing the charge transfer from P3HT to the nanotube. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes: Mixing, Sonication, Stabilization, and Composite Properties
Polymers 2012, 4(1), 275-295; doi:10.3390/polym4010275
Received: 1 December 2011 / Revised: 9 January 2012 / Accepted: 9 January 2012 / Published: 23 January 2012
Cited by 134 | PDF Full-text (1264 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Advances in functionality and reliability of carbon nanotube (CNT) composite materials require careful formulation of processing methods to ultimately realize the desired properties. To date, controlled dispersion of CNTs in a solution or a composite matrix remains a challenge, due to the [...] Read more.
Advances in functionality and reliability of carbon nanotube (CNT) composite materials require careful formulation of processing methods to ultimately realize the desired properties. To date, controlled dispersion of CNTs in a solution or a composite matrix remains a challenge, due to the strong van der Waals binding energies associated with the CNT aggregates. There is also insufficiently defined correlation between the microstructure and the physical properties of the composite. Here, we offer a review of the dispersion processes of pristine (non-covalently functionalized) CNTs in a solvent or a polymer solution. We summarize and adapt relevant theoretical analysis to guide the dispersion design and selection, from the processes of mixing/sonication, to the application of surfactants for stabilization, to the final testing of composite properties. The same approaches are expected to be also applicable to the fabrication of other composite materials involving homogeneously dispersed nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications)

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