Special Issue "Travel Medicine"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Larry Goodyer

School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH, UK
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Travel medicine is a relatively new discipline and the founding of the International Society of Travel Medicine (www.istm.org) occurred in the early 1990s. Pharmacist have, in recent years, become increasingly involved in delivering travel medicine services in the community sector. This has evolved in a number of countries where community pharmacists are now providing a travel vaccination service and are running travel clinics to prepare travellers prior to departure. Pharmacists have also become involved in other aspects of travel medicine, such as providing specialist medical kits for travel and expeditions, and in the management of a variety of infectious diseases encountered by travellers.

In this Special Issue of Pharmacy we are seeking, in particular, reviews and case studies that describe the involvement of pharmacists in providing travel medicine services, which might relate to a particular country or region. As such, activities that are linked to general vaccination services provided through pharmacies are of interest. Authors are also invited to submit articles or original research that might relate to medicines or other health-related products used in travel medicine.

The principle aim of this Special Issue is to share good practices amongst pharmacists providing travel medicine services. We hope that this will encourage further involvement of the profession in this growing speciality

Prof. Larry Goodyer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Travel Medicine
  • Pharmacy
  • Community
  • Travel
  • Practice
  • Vaccination

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview The Role of Pharmacists in Travel Medicine in South Africa
Received: 16 June 2018 / Revised: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 19 July 2018
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Abstract
Worldwide, pharmacists, who are the most accessible health-care providers, are playing an ever increasing role in travel medicine, assisting travelers in taking the necessary precautions to ensure safe and healthy travel. This article looks at the situation in South Africa, and how pharmacists
[...] Read more.
Worldwide, pharmacists, who are the most accessible health-care providers, are playing an ever increasing role in travel medicine, assisting travelers in taking the necessary precautions to ensure safe and healthy travel. This article looks at the situation in South Africa, and how pharmacists are performing these functions within the legal constraints of the Medicines and Related Substances Act 101 of 1965, which prevents pharmacists from prescribing many of the travel vaccines and medications. The scope of practice in community pharmacies increased since the successful down-scheduling of some of the antimalarials, allowing pharmacists to supply the many travelers who frequently travel to neighboring countries. As in many other countries, travel medicine in South Africa is currently thwart with products that are out of stock, and a number of temporary guidelines were put in place to deal with these. Ways to facilitate expanding the role of pharmacists in travel medicine in South Africa need to be further explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Medicine)
Open AccessReview Impact of Pharmacy Based Travel Medicine with the Evolution of Pharmacy Practice in the UK
Received: 10 May 2018 / Revised: 28 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
PDF Full-text (331 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Pharmacy has utilised the changes in legislation since 2000 to increase the range and supply function of services such as travel health to travellers. With the number of travellers leaving the UK and trying new destinations there is an increasing need for
[...] Read more.
Background: Pharmacy has utilised the changes in legislation since 2000 to increase the range and supply function of services such as travel health to travellers. With the number of travellers leaving the UK and trying new destinations there is an increasing need for more travel health provision. Working models: The models of supply of a travel health service vary according to the size of the corporate body. The large multiples can offer assessment via a specialist nurse or doctor service and then supply through the pharmacy. Others will undertake an onsite risk assessment and supply through the pharmacist. The sole Internet suppliers of medication have been reviewed and the assessment standards questioned following survey and inspection. Education: There is no dedicated pharmacist-training programme in advanced level travel health. As a consequence one academic institution allows pharmacists to train on a multidisciplinary course to obtain an academic membership. With training for travel health not being mandatory for any travel health supply function the concern is raised with standards of care. Future: There is a consultation paper on the removal of travel vaccines from NHS supply due to be decided in the future. If these vaccines are removed then they will provide a greater demand on pharmacy services. Discussion: The starting of a travel health service can be made without any additional training and remains unregulated, giving cause for concern to the supply made to the traveller. Conclusions: Pharmacies in the UK offer a range of options for supplying travel health services; however these need to be with improved mandatory training and supply. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Medicine)
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