Special Issue "Proceedings of the Singapore National Clinical Pharmacy Colloquium – Health Manpower Development Planning"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Richard Parrish, BSPharm, PhD, FCCP, BCPS

Chief Pharmacist and Director - St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Department of Pharmacy Services, 160 East Erie Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19134 USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 (215) 427-5317
Fax: +1 (215) 427-5317
Interests: pharmacy paediatrics; perioperative care; medication management; health informatics
Guest Editor
Prof. Lita Chew

1. Head, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543, Singapore
2. Chief Pharmacist, Ministry of Health, Singapore 169854, Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Interests: medication management; medication adherence; pharmacy practice; workforce development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The nation of Singapore highly values its health service as well as the component of healthcare delivery that includes clinical pharmacy and administration. The Ministry of Health engaged my services to better understand the relationship between the Singaporean citizenry and its clinical pharmacists. Through a series of five lectures, four roundtables, two hands-on sessions, and three workshops, clinical pharmacy and its administrative leadership participated in “open-mic” style lectures, discussed the issues facing Singapore pharmacy in its current provision of healthcare services, and deliberated on the future resources required to meet projected healthcare needs. From three distinct perspectives, these discussions were very frank, transparent, and passionate about what practitioners and administrators thought Singaporean health leadership needed to address in terms of (1) what programs and practices to continue; (2) what ones to start; and (3) ones to reconsider. Each of the areas below will be framed using these three perspectives in order to clearly reflect the ideas and suggestions expressed in each of the 14 group sessions. In addition, I met with Ministry of Health leaders regarding non-medical prescribing (NMP), and discussed strategies and tactics that seemed successful as well as unsuccessful in other jurisdictions when adopting expanded scope models for clinical pharmacists and other qualified healthcare providers.

Dr. Richard Parrish
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Singapore
  • pharmacists
  • predictive analytics
  • population health
  • pharmacy technicians

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Other

Open AccessConference Report Briefing Note: Proceedings of the Singapore National Clinical Pharmacy Colloquium—Health Manpower Development Planning
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 7 June 2018 / Published: 12 June 2018
PDF Full-text (180 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The nation of Singapore highly values its health service as well as the component of healthcare delivery that includes clinical pharmacy and administration. The Ministry of Health (MOH) engaged the services of Dr. Richard Parrish to better understand the relationship between the Singaporean
[...] Read more.
The nation of Singapore highly values its health service as well as the component of healthcare delivery that includes clinical pharmacy and administration. The Ministry of Health (MOH) engaged the services of Dr. Richard Parrish to better understand the relationship between the Singaporean citizenry and its clinical pharmacists. Through a series of five lectures, structured from the national to local unit level, four roundtables, two hands-on sessions, and three workshops, clinical pharmacists and administrative leadership participated in “open-mic” style lectures, discussed the issues facing Singapore pharmacy in its current provision of healthcare services, and deliberated on the future resources required to meet projected healthcare needs. From three distinct perspectives, these discussions were very frank, transparent, and passionate about what practitioners and administrators thought Singaporean health leadership needed to address in terms of (1) what programs and practices to continue; (2) what ones to start; and (3) what ones to evaluate. Each of the areas below will be framed using these three perspectives in order to clearly reflect the ideas and suggestions expressed in each of the 14 group sessions. These recommendations are forwarded to MOH pharmacy leadership for consideration and action. In addition, we met with MOH leaders regarding non-medical prescribing (NMP), and discussed strategies and tactics that seemed successful as well as unsuccessful in other jurisdictions when adopting expanded scope models for clinical pharmacists and other qualified healthcare providers that include prescribing of medications. Full article
Back to Top