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Special Issue "Tropical Medicine"

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A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Peter A. Leggat

College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, Division of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville Qld 4811, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: occupational health and safety; injury prevention; pharmaceuticals; aerospace medicine; geographic and travel medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tropical medicines encompass conditions that occur solely or principally in the tropics, as well as those that are more difficult to manage or control in the tropics, which might include a range of communicable as well as non-communicable diseases. Communicable diseases include a number of infectious and parasitic diseases, such as malaria, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, Chagas disease, African trypanosomiasis, and dengue, as well as some of the emerging infectious diseases, such as Ebola. A number of diseases are regarded as neglected tropical diseases by the World Health Organization. Non-communicable diseases often include a number of chronic diseases of growing importance in the tropics, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory diseases and diabetes. This Special Issue will focus on improving our understanding of the global burden on these problems, as well as new developments in pathology, diagnosis, management and prevention of these conditions. It will also include novel mechanisms of drug delivery and treatment.

Prof. Dr. Peter A. Leggat
Guest Editor

Prof. Dr. Peter A. Leggat

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceuticals is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • tropical medicine
  • tropical diseases
  • neglected tropical diseases
  • pharmaceuticals
  • treatment
  • epidemiology
  • infectious diseases
  • filariasis
  • international health

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Displaying articles 1-4
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Review

Open AccessReview Malaria Prophylaxis: A Comprehensive Review
Pharmaceuticals 2010, 3(10), 3212-3239; doi:10.3390/ph3103212
Received: 1 September 2010 / Revised: 7 October 2010 / Accepted: 11 October 2010 / Published: 13 October 2010
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The flow of international travellers to and from malaria-endemic areas, especially Africa, has increased in recent years. Apart from the very high morbidity and mortality burden imposed on malaria-endemic areas, imported malaria is the main cause of fever possibly causing severe disease and
[...] Read more.
The flow of international travellers to and from malaria-endemic areas, especially Africa, has increased in recent years. Apart from the very high morbidity and mortality burden imposed on malaria-endemic areas, imported malaria is the main cause of fever possibly causing severe disease and death in travellers coming from tropical and subtropical areas, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa. The importance of behavioural preventive measures (bed nets, repellents, etc.), adequate chemoprophylaxis and, in selected circumstances, stand-by emergency treatment may not be overemphasized. However, no prophylactic regimen may offer complete protection. Expert advice is needed to tailor prophylactic advice according to traveller (age, baseline clinical conditions, etc.) and travel (destination, season, etc.) characteristics in order to reduce malaria risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tropical Medicine)
Open AccessReview Chemoprophylaxis of Tropical Infectious Diseases
Pharmaceuticals 2010, 3(5), 1561-1575; doi:10.3390/ph3051561
Received: 8 April 2010 / Revised: 28 April 2010 / Accepted: 10 May 2010 / Published: 18 May 2010
PDF Full-text (73 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Travelers to tropical countries are at risk for a variety of infectious diseases. In some cases effective vaccinations are available, but for other infections chemoprophylaxis can be offered. Malaria prevention has become increasingly complex as Plasmodium species become resistant to available drugs. In
[...] Read more.
Travelers to tropical countries are at risk for a variety of infectious diseases. In some cases effective vaccinations are available, but for other infections chemoprophylaxis can be offered. Malaria prevention has become increasingly complex as Plasmodium species become resistant to available drugs. In certain high risk settings, antibiotics can be used to prevent leptospirosis, scrub typhus and other infections. Post-exposure prophylaxis is appropriate for selected virulent infections. In this article the evidence for chemoprophylaxis will be reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tropical Medicine)
Open AccessReview The Treatment of Melioidosis
Pharmaceuticals 2010, 3(5), 1296-1303; doi:10.3390/ph3051296
Received: 19 January 2010 / Revised: 29 March 2010 / Accepted: 20 April 2010 / Published: 27 April 2010
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (102 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Melioidosis is a complex bacterial infection, treatment of which combines the urgency of treating rapidly fatal Gram negative septicaemia with the need for eradication of long-term persistent disease in pulmonary, soft tissue, skeletal and other organ systems. Incremental improvements in treatment have been
[...] Read more.
Melioidosis is a complex bacterial infection, treatment of which combines the urgency of treating rapidly fatal Gram negative septicaemia with the need for eradication of long-term persistent disease in pulmonary, soft tissue, skeletal and other organ systems. Incremental improvements in treatment have been made as a result of multicentre collaboration across the main endemic region of Southeast Asia and northern Australia. There is an emerging consensus on the three main patterns of antimicrobial chemotherapy; initial (Phase 1) treatment, subsequent eradication (Phase 2) therapy and most recently post-exposure (Phase 0) prophylaxis. The combination of agents used, duration of therapy and need for adjunct modalities depends on the type, severity and antimicrobial susceptibility of infection. New antibiotic and adjunct therapies are at an investigational stage but on currently available data are unlikely to make a significant impact on this potentially fatal infection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tropical Medicine)
Open AccessReview Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry in Chagas’ Disease: Compounds at The Final Stage of “Hit-To-Lead” Phase
Pharmaceuticals 2010, 3(4), 810-838; doi:10.3390/ph3040810
Received: 1 February 2010 / Revised: 15 March 2010 / Accepted: 19 March 2010 / Published: 25 March 2010
Cited by 40 | PDF Full-text (638 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chagas’ disease, or American trypanosomosiasis, has been the most relevant illness produced by protozoa in Latin America. Synthetic medicinal chemistry efforts have provided an extensive number of chemodiverse hits at the “active-to-hit” stage. However, only a more limited number of these have been
[...] Read more.
Chagas’ disease, or American trypanosomosiasis, has been the most relevant illness produced by protozoa in Latin America. Synthetic medicinal chemistry efforts have provided an extensive number of chemodiverse hits at the “active-to-hit” stage. However, only a more limited number of these have been studied in vivo in models of Chagas’ disease. Herein, we survey some of the cantidates able to surpass the “hit-to-lead” stage discussing their limitations or merit to enter in clinical trials in the short term. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tropical Medicine)
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