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Special Issue "Nanobiotechnology in Medicinal Chemistry"

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu

Department of Science and Engineereing of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Politehnica University of Bucharest, RO-011061, Bucharest, Romania
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis and characterization of nanobiomaterials, pharmaceutical nanotechnology, drug targeting; drug delivery; anti-biofilm surfaces; nanomodified surfaces; thin films; natural products
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Alina Maria Holban

Microbiology Immunology Department, Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, Aleea Portocalelor no 1-3, 060101 Bucharest, Romania
Website | E-Mail
Interests: in vitro and in vivo bioevaluation of nanostructures; microbiology; immunology; molecular biology; alternative methods for modulating virulence; communication and behavior of microbial pathogens

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, nanotechnology has made significant progress in developing tailored materials and structures with nanometric size for improving different biomedical applications. Inorganic, organic, and mixed (organic–inorganic) nanomaterials currently offer unlimited perspectives for improved and new biomedical applications. The medical field has benefited, in both diagnosis and therapy, by the development of nanostructured drug delivery systems, novel tailored surfaces, and improved materials for implantable and exploratory devices. Most of the recently developed nanomaterials have improved biocompatibility and utilize green technologies for the development of functionalized materials with medical use. Moreover, this approach offers a significant impact on the development of personalized medicine by creating novel and alternative therapeutic strategies for difficult to treat and currently incurable diseases.

Regarding diagnosis, the most important progress has been made on imaging, while for therapy—on targeting. Cancer diagnosis and therapy represents one of the fields that benefited the most from the applications of nanobiotechnology in medicine. Different nanosystems utilized for the stabilization, targeting and controlled delivery or drugs have flourished in recent years. Moreover, another priority field, currently highly-investigated in the medical area—resistant infections, has benefited by the development of nanoparticles able to destroy resistant pathogens and multicellular microbial communities (biofilms), which are tolerant to high amounts of current antimicrobials. Different polymeric nanomaterials have been developed using green technologies in order to reduce the environmental damage and increase biodegradability. Many of the obtained nanomaterials with biological applications currently offer great perspectives for the development of alternative therapies, and may be successfully utilized to replace current inefficient approaches or the complete them.

The proposed topics include, but are not limited to:

-Nanotechnology for cancer therapy
-Nanoparticles in imaging and diagnosis
-Improved nanomaterials for a green medical society
-Polymeric nanobiomaterials
-Antimicrobial nanosystems
-Nanostructured coatings for biofilm control
-Nanoarchitectonics for improved drug delivery
-Inorganic versus organic nanoparticles in biomedical applications
-Surface nanomodified prosthetic devices
-Synthesis and characterization of nanoparticles for biomedical use
-Lab-on-Chip devices

Dr. Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu
Dr. Alina Maria Holban
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceuticals is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Preparation of Temozolomide-Loaded Nanoparticles for Glioblastoma Multiforme Targeting—Ideal Versus Reality
Pharmaceuticals 2016, 9(3), 54; doi:10.3390/ph9030054
Received: 13 July 2016 / Revised: 15 August 2016 / Accepted: 24 August 2016 / Published: 8 September 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (985 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Temozolomide (TMZ) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for glioblastoma multiforme, but the required high administration dose is accompanied by side effects. To overcome this problem and to further improve TMZ’s efficacy, targeted delivery of TMZ by using polymeric nanoparticles has
[...] Read more.
Temozolomide (TMZ) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for glioblastoma multiforme, but the required high administration dose is accompanied by side effects. To overcome this problem and to further improve TMZ’s efficacy, targeted delivery of TMZ by using polymeric nanoparticles has been explored. We synthesised the PLGA-PEG-FOL copolymer and attempted encapsulation of TMZ into PLGA-PEG-FOL nanoparticles using the emulsion solvent evaporation method and the nanoprecipitation method. Conjugation of PEG and FOL to PLGA has been reported to be able to increase the delivery of TMZ to the brain as well as targeting the glioma cells. However, despite making numerous modifications to these methods, the loading of TMZ in the nanoparticles only ranged between 0.2% and 2%, and the nanoparticles were between 400 nm and 600 nm in size after freeze-drying. We proceed with determining the release profile of TMZ in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Our initial data indicated that TMZ was slowly released from the nanoparticles. The metabolite of TMZ rather than the parent compound was detected in PBS. Our study suggests that while PLGA-PEG-FOL can be used as a polymeric or encapsulation material for central delivery of TMZ, a practical and cost effective formulation method is still far from reach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanobiotechnology in Medicinal Chemistry)
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Open AccessArticle Polylactic Acid—Lemongrass Essential Oil Nanocapsules with Antimicrobial Properties
Pharmaceuticals 2016, 9(3), 42; doi:10.3390/ph9030042
Received: 20 April 2016 / Revised: 27 June 2016 / Accepted: 1 July 2016 / Published: 7 July 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (5198 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polylactic acid was combined with lemongrass essential oil (EO) to produce functional nanocapsules (NCs). The obtained polylactic acid nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity both with and without the presence of lemongrass oil; however, the presence of EO improved the activity of the NCs. The
[...] Read more.
Polylactic acid was combined with lemongrass essential oil (EO) to produce functional nanocapsules (NCs). The obtained polylactic acid nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity both with and without the presence of lemongrass oil; however, the presence of EO improved the activity of the NCs. The presence of lemongrass assisted the formation of well-separated NCs and also provided enhanced antimicrobial properties, since lemongrass is known for its antimicrobial character. Fluorescence microscopy was used to optically observe the nanoparticles and NCs and revealed the attachment of lemongrass oil with the polylactic acid NCs. Dynamic light scattering was used to determine their size. UV absorption was used to determine the exact amount of lemongrass oil found in the polylactic acid—lemongrass oil NCs, which was important for understanding the minimum inhibitory concentration for the antimicrobial experiments. A series of clinically important microbial species were used in the study and the obtained NCs proved to have very good antimicrobial properties against all tested strains. Such NCs can be used for the design of ecological strategies, based on natural alternatives, which may be efficient against severe infections, including those that involve resistant pathogens and biofilms or those with difficult to reach localization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanobiotechnology in Medicinal Chemistry)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Methods of Synthesis, Properties and Biomedical Applications of CuO Nanoparticles
Pharmaceuticals 2016, 9(4), 75; doi:10.3390/ph9040075
Received: 17 August 2016 / Revised: 21 November 2016 / Accepted: 22 November 2016 / Published: 30 November 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (944 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study aims to provide an updated survey of the main synthesis methods of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles in order to obtain tailored nanosystems for various biomedical applications. The synthesis approach significantly impacts the properties of such nanoparticles and these properties in turn
[...] Read more.
This study aims to provide an updated survey of the main synthesis methods of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles in order to obtain tailored nanosystems for various biomedical applications. The synthesis approach significantly impacts the properties of such nanoparticles and these properties in turn have a significant impact on their biomedical applications. Although not widely investigated as an efficient drug delivery system, CuO nanoparticles have great biological properties including effective antimicrobial action against a wide range of pathogens and also drug resistant bacteria. These properties have led to the development of various approaches with direct applications to the biomedical field, such as tailored surfaces with antimicrobial effect, wound dressings and modified textiles. It is also believed that these nanosystems could represent efficient alternatives in the development of smart systems utilized both for the detection of pathogens and for the treatment of infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanobiotechnology in Medicinal Chemistry)
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Open AccessReview Nanosized Drug Delivery Systems in Gastrointestinal Targeting: Interactions with Microbiota
Pharmaceuticals 2016, 9(4), 62; doi:10.3390/ph9040062
Received: 24 August 2016 / Revised: 23 September 2016 / Accepted: 26 September 2016 / Published: 29 September 2016
PDF Full-text (476 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The new age of nanotechnology has signaled a stream of entrepreneurial possibilities in various areas, form industry to medicine. Drug delivery has benefited the most by introducing nanostructured systems in the transport and controlled release of therapeutic molecules at targeted sites associated with
[...] Read more.
The new age of nanotechnology has signaled a stream of entrepreneurial possibilities in various areas, form industry to medicine. Drug delivery has benefited the most by introducing nanostructured systems in the transport and controlled release of therapeutic molecules at targeted sites associated with a particular disease. As many nanosized particles reach the gastrointestinal tract by various means, their interactions with the molecular components of this highly active niche are intensively investigated. The well-characterized antimicrobial activities of numerous nanoparticles are currently being considered as a reliable and efficient alternative to the eminent world crisis in antimicrobial drug discovery. The interactions of nanosystems present in the gastrointestinal route with host microbiota is unavoidable; hence, a major research initiative is needed to explore the mechanisms and effects of these nanomaterials on microbiota and the impact that microbiota may have in the outcome of therapies entailing drug delivery nanosystems through the gastrointestinal route. These coordinated studies will provide novel techniques to replace or act synergistically with current technologies and help develop new treatments for major diseases via the discovery of unique antimicrobial molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanobiotechnology in Medicinal Chemistry)
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