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Special Issue "Diuretics"

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A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. George C. Roush

Department of Medicine, St Vincent's Medical Center, 2800 Main St, Bridgeport, CT 06606, USA
Interests: diuretics; internal medicine; preventive medicine

Special Issue Information

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceuticals is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Clinical Pharmacology of Furosemide in Neonates: A Review
Pharmaceuticals 2013, 6(9), 1094-1129; doi:10.3390/ph6091094
Received: 16 April 2013 / Revised: 28 August 2013 / Accepted: 30 August 2013 / Published: 5 September 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (212 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Furosemide is the diuretic most used in newborn infants. It blocks the Na+-K+-2Cl symporter in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle increasing urinary excretion of Na+ and Cl. This article aimed [...] Read more.
Furosemide is the diuretic most used in newborn infants. It blocks the Na+-K+-2Cl symporter in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle increasing urinary excretion of Na+ and Cl. This article aimed to review the published data on the clinical pharmacology of furosemide in neonates to provide a critical, comprehensive, authoritative and, updated survey on the metabolism, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and side-effects of furosemide in neonates. The bibliographic search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases as search engines; January 2013 was the cutoff point. Furosemide half-life (t1/2) is 6 to 20-fold longer, clearance (Cl) is 1.2 to 14-fold smaller and volume of distribution (Vd) is 1.3 to 6-fold larger than the adult values. t1/2 shortens and Cl increases as the neonatal maturation proceeds. Continuous intravenous infusion of furosemide yields more controlled diuresis than the intermittent intravenous infusion. Furosemide may be administered by inhalation to infants with chronic lung disease to improve pulmonary mechanics. Furosemide stimulates prostaglandin E2 synthesis, a potent dilator of the patent ductus arteriosus, and the administration of furosemide to any preterm infants should be carefully weighed against the risk of precipitation of a symptomatic patent ductus arteriosus. Infants with low birthweight treated with chronic furosemide are at risk for the development of intra-renal calcifications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diuretics)
Open AccessReview Role of Diuretics and Ultrafiltration in Congestive Heart Failure
Pharmaceuticals 2013, 6(7), 851-866; doi:10.3390/ph6070851
Received: 21 March 2013 / Revised: 21 May 2013 / Accepted: 14 June 2013 / Published: 4 July 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (476 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Volume overload in heart failure (HF) results from neurohumoral activation causing renal sodium and water retention secondary to arterial underfilling. Volume overload not only causes signs and symptoms of congestion, but can impact myocardial remodeling and HF progression. Thus, treating congestion is [...] Read more.
Volume overload in heart failure (HF) results from neurohumoral activation causing renal sodium and water retention secondary to arterial underfilling. Volume overload not only causes signs and symptoms of congestion, but can impact myocardial remodeling and HF progression. Thus, treating congestion is a cornerstone of HF management. Loop diuretics are the most commonly used drugs in this setting. However, up to 30% of the patients with decompensated HF present with loop-diuretic resistance. A universally accepted definition of loop diuretic resistance, however, is lacking. Several approaches to treat diuretic-resistant HF are available, including addition of distal acting thiazide diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs), or vasoactive drugs. Slow continuous veno-venous ultrafiltration is another option. Ultrafiltration, if it is started early in the course of HF decompensation, may result in prominent decongestion and a reduction in re-hospitalization. On the other hand, ultrafiltration in HF patients with worsening renal function and volume overload after aggressive treatment with loop diuretics, failed to show benefit compared to a stepwise pharmacological approach, including diuretics and vasoactive drugs. Early detection of congested HF patients for ultrafiltration treatment might improve decongestion and reduce readmission. However, the best patient characteristics and best timing of ultrafiltration requires further evaluation in randomized controlled studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diuretics)

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