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Special Issue "Nutrition Solutions for a Changing World"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jonathan Buckley

Director, Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
Joint Editor-in-Chief, Nutrients.
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61 8 8302 1853
Interests: cardiometabolic effects of nutrition; physical performance; sports nutrition
Guest Editor
Dr. Malcolm Riley

Senior Research Scientist, Health and Biosecurity, Commonwealth
Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Adelaide, Australia
Immediate Past President, Nutrition Society of Australia
E-Mail
Phone: +61 8 8303 8989
Interests: dietary intake measurement; population dietary intake; epidemiology; health of Indigenous Australians
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lisa Wood

Research Professor, School of Biomedical Science and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
President Elect, Nutrition Society of Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61 2 40420147
Fax: +612 4042 0046
Interests: nutrition; inflammation; immunity; antioxidants; fatty acids; obesity; respiratory disease; asthma; COPD
Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sheila Skeaff

Research Professor, Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
President, Nutrition Society of New Zealand.
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +643 479 7944
Interests: nutritional assessment; nutrient deficiency; minerals and trace elements; salt; lifecycle nutrition; food literacy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The focus of this Special Issue is “Nutrition Solutions for a Changing World”, which was the theme for the 10th Asia Pacific Conference on Clinical Nutrition which held in Adelaide, Australia, from 26–29 November, 2017.

The conference was a joint meeting of the Nutrition Society of Australia, the Nutrition Society of New Zealand and the Asia Pacific Society for Clinical Nutrition and this Special Issue contains selected papers from that meeting.

Prof. Dr. Jonathan Buckley
Dr. Malcolm Riley
Prof. Dr. Lisa Wood
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sheila Skeaff
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Effects of Substitution, and Adding of Carbohydrate and Fat to Whey-Protein on Energy Intake, Appetite, Gastric Emptying, Glucose, Insulin, Ghrelin, CCK and GLP-1 in Healthy Older Men—A Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2018, 10(2), 113; doi:10.3390/nu10020113 (registering DOI)
Received: 13 December 2017 / Revised: 5 January 2018 / Accepted: 18 January 2018 / Published: 23 January 2018
PDF Full-text (1352 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Protein-rich supplements are used widely for the management of malnutrition in the elderly. We reported previously that the suppression of energy intake by whey protein is less in older than younger adults. The aim was to determine the effects of substitution, and adding
[...] Read more.
Protein-rich supplements are used widely for the management of malnutrition in the elderly. We reported previously that the suppression of energy intake by whey protein is less in older than younger adults. The aim was to determine the effects of substitution, and adding of carbohydrate and fat to whey protein, on ad libitum energy intake from a buffet meal (180–210 min), gastric emptying (3D-ultrasonography), plasma gut hormone concentrations (0–180 min) and appetite (visual analogue scales), in healthy older men. In a randomized, double-blind order, 13 older men (75 ± 2 years) ingested drinks (~450 mL) containing: (i) 70 g whey protein (280 kcal; ‘P280’); (ii) 14 g protein, 28 g carbohydrate, 12.4 g fat (280 kcal; ‘M280’); (iii) 70 g protein, 28 g carbohydrate, 12.4 g fat (504 kcal; ‘M504’); or (iv) control (~2 kcal). The caloric drinks, compared to a control, did not suppress appetite or energy intake; there was an increase in total energy intake (drink + meal, p < 0.05), which was increased most by the M504-drink. P280- and M504-drink ingestion were associated with slower a gastric-emptying time (n = 9), lower ghrelin, and higher cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) than M280 (p < 0.05). Glucose and insulin were increased most by the mixed-macronutrient drinks (p < 0.05). In conclusion, energy intake was not suppressed, compared to a control, and particularly whey protein, affected gastric emptying and gut hormone responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Solutions for a Changing World)
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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Pictorial Dietary Assessment Tool for Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes: Cost, Accuracy, and User Satisfaction Analysis
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 27; doi:10.3390/nu10010027
Received: 24 November 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 22 December 2017 / Published: 28 December 2017
PDF Full-text (1176 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although nutritional screening and dietary monitoring in clinical settings are important, studies on related user satisfaction and cost benefit are still lacking. This study aimed to: (1) elucidate the cost of implementing a newly developed dietary monitoring tool, the Pictorial Dietary Assessment Tool
[...] Read more.
Although nutritional screening and dietary monitoring in clinical settings are important, studies on related user satisfaction and cost benefit are still lacking. This study aimed to: (1) elucidate the cost of implementing a newly developed dietary monitoring tool, the Pictorial Dietary Assessment Tool (PDAT); and (2) investigate the accuracy of estimation and satisfaction of healthcare staff after the use of the PDAT. A cross-over intervention study was conducted among 132 hospitalized patients with diabetes. Cost and time for the implementation of PDAT in comparison to modified Comstock was estimated using the activity-based costing approach. Accuracy was expressed as the percentages of energy and protein obtained by both methods, which were within 15% and 30%, respectively, of those obtained by the food weighing. Satisfaction of healthcare staff was measured using a standardized questionnaire. Time to complete the food intake recording of patients using PDAT (2.31 ± 0.70 min) was shorter than when modified Comstock (3.53 ± 1.27 min) was used (p < 0.001). Overall cost per patient was slightly higher for PDAT (United States Dollar 0.27 ± 0.02) than for modified Comstock (USD 0.26 ± 0.04 (p < 0.05)). The accuracy of energy intake estimated by modified Comstock was 10% lower than that of PDAT. There was poorer accuracy of protein intake estimated by modified Comstock (<40%) compared to that estimated by the PDAT (>71%) (p < 0.05). Mean user satisfaction of healthcare staff was significantly higher for PDAT than that for modified Comstock (p < 0.05). PDAT requires a shorter time to be completed and was rated better than modified Comstock. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Solutions for a Changing World)
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Figure 1

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