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Special Issue "Dietary Intake and Type 2 Diabetes"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Omorogieva Ojo

Department of Adult Nursing and Paramedic Science, Faculty of Education and Health, University of Greenwich, London, SE9 2UG, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 (0)20 8331 8626
Fax: +44(0)20 8331 8060
Interests: diabetes, structured education in diabetes for ethnic minorities, evaluation of the glycaemic index of some carbohydrate rich ethnic minority foods in the uk, clinical nutrition, enteral tube feeding in the community, multi-morbidity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The prevalence of diabetes is on the rise globally, and it is estimated that about 90% of adults currently diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, 2015). According to the World Health Organisation (2016), an estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014 compared with 108 million in 1980 and this condition caused about 1.5 million deaths in 2012.

Strategies for managing type 2 diabetes often include dietary interventions. Therefore, the current Special Issue on dietary intake and type 2 diabetes aims to provide a platform for researchers to publish their research findings. It will also enable patients and others including nurses, dietitians and doctors who are involved in this area of practice to draw on the research findings for management, practice, clinical and professional development.

Dr. Omorogieva Ojo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Macronutrients intake and type 2 diabetes
  • Micronutrients intake and type 2 diabetes
  • Oral nutritional supplements and type 2 diabetes
  • Special diets including low carbohydrate diet, low fat diet, enteral nutrition, diabetes specific formulas and type 2 diabetes
  • Dietary fibre intake and type 2 diabetes
  • Low glycaemic index diet and type 2 diabetes

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effects of Tempeh Fermentation with Lactobacillus plantarum and Rhizopus oligosporus on Streptozotocin-Induced Type II Diabetes Mellitus in Rats
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1143; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091143
Received: 28 July 2018 / Revised: 13 August 2018 / Accepted: 17 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
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Abstract
The increased consumption of high fat-containing foods has been linked to the prevalence of obesity and abnormal metabolic syndromes. Rhizopus oligosporus, a fungus in the family Mucoraceae, is widely used as a starter for homemade tempeh. Although R. oligosporus can prevent the
[...] Read more.
The increased consumption of high fat-containing foods has been linked to the prevalence of obesity and abnormal metabolic syndromes. Rhizopus oligosporus, a fungus in the family Mucoraceae, is widely used as a starter for homemade tempeh. Although R. oligosporus can prevent the growth of other microorganisms, it grows well with lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Lactobacillus plantarum can produce β-glucosidase, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucoside isoflavones into aglycones (with greater bioavailability). Therefore, the development of a soybean-based functional food by the co-inoculation of R. oligosporus and L. plantarum is a promising approach to increase the bioactivity of tempeh. In this study, the ameliorative effect of L. plantarum in soy tempeh on abnormal carbohydrate metabolism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hyperglycemic rats was evaluated. The co-incubation of L. plantarum with R. oligosporus during soy tempeh fermentation reduced the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, HbA1c, serum glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, free fatty acid, insulin, and low-density lipoprotein contents, and significantly increased the high-density lipoprotein content in HFD rats. It also increased the LAB counts, as well as the bile acid, cholesterol, triglyceride, and short-chain fatty acid contents in the feces of HFD rats. Our results suggested that the modulation of serum glucose and lipid levels by LAB occurs via alterations in the internal microbiota, leading to the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis and promotion of lipolysis. Tempeh, which was produced with both L. plantarum and R. oligosporus, might be a beneficial dietary supplement for individuals with abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Type 2 Diabetes)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Dietary Approaches for Japanese Patients with Diabetes: A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 1080; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10081080
Received: 6 July 2018 / Revised: 1 August 2018 / Accepted: 8 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
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Abstract
This study aimed to elucidate the effect of an energy restricted and carbohydrate restricted diet on the management of Japanese diabetes patients. Several databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society were searched for relevant articles published prior to June 2017.
[...] Read more.
This study aimed to elucidate the effect of an energy restricted and carbohydrate restricted diet on the management of Japanese diabetes patients. Several databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society were searched for relevant articles published prior to June 2017. The articles identified were systematically reviewed. We identified 286 articles on an energy restricted diet, assessed seven and included two studies in our review. On a carbohydrate restricted diet, 75 articles were extracted, seven articles assessed and three included in the review, of which two were the studies that were selected for the energy restricted diet group, since they compared energy restricted diets with carbohydrate restricted diets. All selected studies were on Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. No studies for type 1 diabetes were found in our search. Two randomized controlled trials on an energy restricted diet were also included in the three studies for a carbohydrate restricted diet. All the three randomized controlled trials showed better glucose management with the carbohydrate restricted diet. Our study revealed that there is very little evidence on diets, particularly in Japanese patients with diabetes, and that the energy restricted diet, which has been recommended by the Japan Diabetes Society in the sole dietary management approach, is not supported by any scientific evidence. Our findings suggest that the carbohydrate restricted diet, but not the energy restricted diet, might have short term benefits for the management of diabetes in Japanese patients. However, since our analysis was based on a limited number of small randomized controlled trials, large scale and/or long term trials examining the dietary approaches in these patients are needed to confirm our findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Type 2 Diabetes)
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Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Combination of Aronia, Red Ginseng, Shiitake Mushroom and Nattokinase Potentiated Insulin Secretion and Reduced Insulin Resistance with Improving Gut Microbiome Dysbiosis in Insulin Deficient Type 2 Diabetic Rats
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070948
Received: 12 June 2018 / Revised: 3 July 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
PDF Full-text (2025 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The combination of freeze-dried aronia, red ginseng, ultraviolet-irradiated shiitake mushroom and nattokinase (AGM; 3.4:4.1:2.4:0.1) was examined to evaluate its effects on insulin resistance, insulin secretion and the gut microbiome in a non-obese type 2 diabetic animal model. Pancreatectomized (Px) rats were provided high
[...] Read more.
The combination of freeze-dried aronia, red ginseng, ultraviolet-irradiated shiitake mushroom and nattokinase (AGM; 3.4:4.1:2.4:0.1) was examined to evaluate its effects on insulin resistance, insulin secretion and the gut microbiome in a non-obese type 2 diabetic animal model. Pancreatectomized (Px) rats were provided high fat diets supplemented with either (1) 0.5 g AGM (AGM-L), (2) 1 g AGM (AGM-H), (3) 1 g dextrin (control), or (4) 1 g dextrin with 120 mg metformin (positive-control) per kg body weight for 12 weeks. AGM (1 g) contained 6.22 mg cyanidin-3-galactose, 2.5 mg ginsenoside Rg3 and 244 mg β-glucan. Px rats had decreased bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femur and lean body mass in the hip and leg compared to the normal-control and AGM-L and AGM-H prevented the decrease. Visceral fat mass was lower in the control group than the normal-control group and its decrease was smaller with AGM-L and AGM-H. HOMA-IR was lower in descending order of the control, positive-control, AGM-L, AGM-H and normal-control groups. Glucose tolerance deteriorated in the control group and was improved by AGM-L and AGM-H more than in the positive-control group. Glucose tolerance is associated with insulin resistance and insulin secretion. Insulin tolerance indicated insulin resistance was highly impaired in diabetic rats, but it was improved in the ascending order of the positive-control, AGM-L and AGM-H. Insulin secretion capacity, measured by hyperglycemic clamp, was much lower in the control group than the normal-control group and it was improved in the ascending order of the positive-control, AGM-L and AGM-H. Diabetes modulated the composition of the gut microbiome and AGM prevented the modulation of gut microbiome. In conclusion, AGM improved glucose metabolism by potentiating insulin secretion and reducing insulin resistance in insulin deficient type 2 diabetic rats. The improvement of diabetic status alleviated body composition changes and prevented changes of gut microbiome composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Type 2 Diabetes)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Author: Trevor Thompon
Affiliation: Faculty of Education and Health, University of Greenwich, London, United Kingdom
Topic: Diabetes specific formulas and type 2 diabetes

Author: Florence, N. Enyinnaya
Affiliation: Oxleas NHS foundation Trust, HMP Belmarsh, London. UK.
Topic: Dietary management and type 2 diabetes

Author: Xiao-Hua Wang
Affiliation: School of Nursing, Medical College, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Topic: Macro nutrient and type 2 diabetes

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