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Special Issue "Dairy Nutrition"

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A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Karen Murphy

Nutritional Physiology Research Centre, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dairy is an important source of nutrients such as calcium, protein, peptides, amino acids, vitamins and minerals. However consumption of dairy may be discouraged by concern about the risk of obesity and other chronic disease. Dairy may in fact be associated with reduced obesity, risk of heart disease, better cognitive health and increased satiety in addition to benefits to bone health.  Progress has been made to help scientifically substantiate the potential health benefits associated with dairy consumption but more is needed to help change the negative perception that dairy sometimes appears to have.  The purpose of this special issue is to provide a summary of new research highlighting the potential health benefits associated with dairy consumption.

Dr. Karen Murphy
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • blood pressure
  • blood cholesterol
  • body weight
  • body composition
  • osteoporosis
  • bone health
  • cognitive function
  • dairy and healthy diets
  • dietary intakes
  • calcium
  • vitamin D
  • protein
  • vitamins
  • minerals
  • fat
  • satiety
  • exercise

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Dairy Foods and Dairy Protein Consumption Is Inversely Related to Markers of Adiposity in Obese Men and Women
Nutrients 2013, 5(11), 4665-4684; doi:10.3390/nu5114665
Received: 16 October 2013 / Revised: 11 November 2013 / Accepted: 13 November 2013 / Published: 20 November 2013
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (221 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A number of intervention studies have reported that the prevalence of obesity may be in part inversely related to dairy food consumption while others report no association. We sought to examine relationships between energy, protein and calcium consumption from dairy foods (milk, yoghurt,
[...] Read more.
A number of intervention studies have reported that the prevalence of obesity may be in part inversely related to dairy food consumption while others report no association. We sought to examine relationships between energy, protein and calcium consumption from dairy foods (milk, yoghurt, cheese, dairy spreads, ice-cream) and adiposity including body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip circumference (HC), and direct measures of body composition using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (% body fat and abdominal fat) in an opportunistic sample of 720 overweight/obese Australian men and women. Mean (SD) age, weight and BMI of the population were 51 ± 10 year, 94 ± 18 kg and 32.4 ± 5.7 kg/m2, respectively. Reduced fat milk was the most commonly consumed dairy product (235 ± 200 g/day), followed by whole milk (63 ± 128 g/day) and yoghurt (53 ± 66 g/day). Overall dairy food consumption (g/day) was inversely associated with BMI, % body fat and WC (all p < 0.05). Dairy protein and dairy calcium (g/day) were both inversely associated with all adiposity measures (all p < 0.05). Yoghurt consumption (g/day) was inversely associated with % body fat, abdominal fat, WC and HC (all p < 0.05), while reduced fat milk consumption was inversely associated with BMI, WC, HC and % body fat (all p < 0.05). Within a sample of obese adults, consumption of dairy products, dairy protein, and calcium was associated with more favourable body composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle Food Sources of Energy and Nutrients among Children in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2006
Nutrients 2013, 5(1), 283-301; doi:10.3390/nu5010283
Received: 8 November 2012 / Revised: 3 January 2013 / Accepted: 7 January 2013 / Published: 22 January 2013
Cited by 46 | PDF Full-text (583 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Background: Recent detailed analyses of data on dietary sources of energy and nutrients in US children are lacking. The objective of this study was to identify food sources of energy and 28 nutrients for children in the United States. Methods: Analyses of food
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Background: Recent detailed analyses of data on dietary sources of energy and nutrients in US children are lacking. The objective of this study was to identify food sources of energy and 28 nutrients for children in the United States. Methods: Analyses of food sources were conducted using a single 24-h recall collected from children 2 to 18 years old (n = 7332) in the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Sources of nutrients contained in foods were determined using nutrient composition databases. Food grouping included ingredients from disaggregated mixtures. Mean energy and nutrient intakes from the total diet and from each food group were adjusted for the sample design using appropriate weights. Percentages of the total dietary intake that food sources contributed were tabulated by rank order. Results: The two top ranked food/food group sources of energy and nutrients were: energy — milk (7% of energy) and cake/cookies/quick bread/pastry/pie (7%); protein — milk (13.2%) and poultry (12.8%); total carbohydrate — soft drinks/soda (10.5%) and yeast bread/rolls (9.1%); total sugars — soft drinks/soda (19.2%) and yeast breads and rolls (12.7%); added sugars — soft drinks/soda (29.7%) and candy/sugar/sugary foods (18.6%); dietary fiber — fruit (10.4%) and yeast bread/rolls (10.3%); total fat — cheese (9.3%) and crackers/popcorn/pretzels/chips (8.4%); saturated fatty acids — cheese (16.3%) and milk (13.3%); cholesterol — eggs (24.2%) and poultry (13.2%); vitamin D — milk (60.4%) and milk drinks (8.3%); calcium — milk (33.2%) and cheese (19.4%); potassium — milk (18.8%) and fruit juice (8.0%); and sodium — salt (18.5%) and yeast bread and rolls (8.4%). Conclusions: Results suggest that many foods/food groupings consumed by children were energy dense, nutrient poor. Awareness of dietary sources of energy and nutrients can help health professionals design effective strategies to reduce energy consumption and increase the nutrient density of children’s diets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle Food Sources of Energy and Nutrients among Adults in the US: NHANES 2003–2006
Nutrients 2012, 4(12), 2097-2120; doi:10.3390/nu4122097
Received: 22 October 2012 / Revised: 28 November 2012 / Accepted: 6 December 2012 / Published: 19 December 2012
Cited by 43 | PDF Full-text (838 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Identification of current food sources of energy and nutrients among US adults is needed to help with public health efforts to implement feasible and appropriate dietary recommendations. To determine the food sources of energy and 26 nutrients consumed by US adults the 2003–2006
[...] Read more.
Identification of current food sources of energy and nutrients among US adults is needed to help with public health efforts to implement feasible and appropriate dietary recommendations. To determine the food sources of energy and 26 nutrients consumed by US adults the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 24-h recall (Day 1) dietary intake data from a nationally representative sample of adults 19+ years of age (y) (n = 9490) were analyzed. An updated USDA Dietary Source Nutrient Database was developed for NHANES 2003–2006 using current food composition databases. Food grouping included ingredients from disaggregated mixtures. Mean energy and nutrient intakes from food sources were sample-weighted. Percentages of total dietary intake contributed from food sources were ranked. The highest ranked sources of energy and nutrients among adults more than 19 years old were: energy — yeast bread/rolls (7.2%) and cake/cookies/quick bread/pastry/pie (7.2%); protein—poultry (14.4%) and beef (14.0%); total fat — other fats and oils (9.8%); saturated fatty acids — cheese (16.5%) and beef (9.1%); carbohydrate — soft drinks/soda (11.4%) and yeast breads/rolls (10.9%); dietary fiber — yeast breads/rolls (10.9%) and fruit (10.2%); calcium — milk (22.5%) and cheese (21.6%); vitamin D — milk (45.1%) and fish/shellfish (14.4%); and potassium — milk (9.6%) and coffee/tea/other non-alcoholic beverages (8.4%). Knowledge of primary food sources of energy and nutrients can help health professionals design effective strategies to reduce excess energy consumed by US adults and increase the nutrient adequacy of their diets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle Changes in Dairy Food and Nutrient Intakes in Australian Adolescents
Nutrients 2012, 4(12), 1794-1811; doi:10.3390/nu4121794
Received: 22 August 2012 / Revised: 16 October 2012 / Accepted: 5 November 2012 / Published: 22 November 2012
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (743 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dairy nutrients, such as calcium, are particularly important in adolescence, a critical time for growth and development. There are limited Australian data following individuals through adolescence, evaluating changes in dairy nutrient and dairy product consumption. We used a validated food frequency questionnaire to
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Dairy nutrients, such as calcium, are particularly important in adolescence, a critical time for growth and development. There are limited Australian data following individuals through adolescence, evaluating changes in dairy nutrient and dairy product consumption. We used a validated food frequency questionnaire to investigate consumption in adolescents participating in both the 14 and 17 year follow-ups of the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Most adolescents did not reach age and gender specific recommended daily intakes for calcium or magnesium at 14 years, and this decreased as they aged to 17 years (from 33.0% to 29.2% meeting for calcium, P < 0.05, and from 33.6% to 20.5% meeting for magnesium, P < 0.01). Mean intakes of calcium, potassium, riboflavin and vitamin A also decreased with age (P < 0.01). Mean dairy intake decreased from 536 ± 343 g/day to 464 ± 339 g/day (P < 0.01), due mostly to a decrease in regular milk, although flavoured milk consumption increased in boys. Cheese and butter were the only products to show a significantly increased consumption over the period. Girls decreased from 2.2 to 1.9 serves/day of dairy, while boys remained relatively steady at 2.9 to 2.8 serves/day. Our findings suggest that dairy product consumption decreases over adolescence. This may have implications for bone mass, development and later health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Nutrition)

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