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Special Issue "Early Life Nutrition: From Nutrients to Systems"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 March 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Rebecca Golley

School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences (Nutrition), University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: behavioural nutrition; diet quality; obesity prevention; children

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The first five years of life is a period when dietary behaviours that promote optimal nutrition, growth and development are established or begin to track over the life course. The influence of early nutrition on health reflects the complex interplay between child and family factors with the broader social, physical, political and institutional environments in which children live, learn and eat. Nutrition promotion and health interventions, including obesity prevention, need to leverage a broad evidence-base spanning nutrition science, behavioural nutrition and public health nutrition policy and practice. This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled; "Early Life Nutrition: From Nutrients to Systems" welcomes the submission of manuscripts describing either epidemiological, behavioural, methodological, qualitative, intervention or policy research.

Potential topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Food intake and dietary behaviours of infants, toddlers and pre-school children
  • Parent feeding practices, particularly in vulnerable populations
  • Socio ecological predictors of early life nutrition
  • Early life nutrition interventions targeting diet quality, growth (e.g., obesity), health (e.g., dental caries) and development (e.g., cognitive development)
  • Measuring diet in young children
  • Early life nutrition service delivery: policy, economic and practice implications
Dr. Rebecca Golley
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dietary intake
  • Socio-ecological model
  • Infant, toddler and pre-schoolers
  • Obesity prevention

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Differential Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Status and Placental Transport in Adolescent Pregnancies
Nutrients 2018, 10(2), 220; doi:10.3390/nu10020220
Received: 7 December 2017 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 15 February 2018
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Abstract
Adolescent pregnancy increases risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. Placental delivery of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) is essential for fetal growth and development. In this pilot study, we aimed to assess maternal and fetal status of fatty acids (FA) measured at birth and
[...] Read more.
Adolescent pregnancy increases risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. Placental delivery of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) is essential for fetal growth and development. In this pilot study, we aimed to assess maternal and fetal status of fatty acids (FA) measured at birth and the expression of key genes involved in FA uptake, transport and metabolism in the placenta of fifteen adolescents and fifteen adults. FA were quantified by gas-liquid chromatography. Placental expression of FA transporters was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) was quantified by Western Blot. Adolescents had lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) and total n-3 FA levels in maternal erythrocytes and placenta, but these were not different in fetal erythrocytes. Arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4 n-6) concentration was increased in placenta but lower in fetal circulation. Plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein (FABPpm) and fatty acid transport protein (FATP) 4 mRNA expressions were not different, however FATP1, fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) mRNA and PPARγ protein levels were decreased in placenta of adolescents. Despite significant downregulation of FATP1, CD36 and FABP3, there was only a modest decrease in LCPUFA (10%) and AA (12%) and no difference in DHA content in cord blood, suggesting that FA transfer to the fetus was partially protected by other factors in adolescents from this cohort. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Early Life Nutrition: From Nutrients to Systems)
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Open AccessArticle Relative Validity of a 24-h Recall in Assessing Intake of Key Nutrients in a Cohort of Australian Toddlers
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 80; doi:10.3390/nu10010080
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 9 January 2018 / Accepted: 11 January 2018 / Published: 12 January 2018
PDF Full-text (1250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
There is limited information concerning the dietary intake of toddlers in Australia. Consequently, there is a need for studies investigating toddler intake that use dietary assessment measures that are valid and place a low participant burden on caregivers. The aim of this study
[...] Read more.
There is limited information concerning the dietary intake of toddlers in Australia. Consequently, there is a need for studies investigating toddler intake that use dietary assessment measures that are valid and place a low participant burden on caregivers. The aim of this study was to determine the relative validity of a single 24-h dietary recall (24HR) in measuring the intake of five nutrients in a cohort of Australian toddlers compared to a combined 24HR and 2-day estimated food record (2DFR). A single 24HR and a 2DFR were collected from a cohort of Australian toddlers (n = 699) at approximately 12 months of age as part of the Study of Mothers’ and Infants’ Life Events affecting oral health (SMILE) project. Relative validity of one day of dietary data (24HR) in assessing intake of energy, protein, calcium, iron, and added sugars was tested against three days of dietary data (24HR + 2DFR) using paired t-tests, Bland–Altman analysis, cross-classification, and weighted Kappa statistic. Classification analysis found good agreement between the 24HR and 24HR + 2DFR for all nutrients with the percentage classified in the same tertile at 57.9% and above. The weighted Kappa statistic found acceptable agreement for all nutrients. This study suggests that a 24HR is a valid assessment tool for estimating the relative intake of energy, protein, calcium, iron, and added sugars among Australian toddlers at the individual level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Early Life Nutrition: From Nutrients to Systems)
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