Special Issue "Polysaccharide-Based Nanosorbent Materials: Fundamental Science and Beyond"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lee D. Wilson

Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-306-966-2961
Fax: +1-306-966-4730
Interests: water; solution chemistry; macromolecules; polymers; biomaterials; membranes; porous materials; sorption phenomena; hydrophobic effect; carbohydrates; self-assembly; colloid and surface chemistry; molecular recognition; materials and environmental science; physical chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is ongoing interest in the scientific and technological development of polysaccharide adsorbent materials (e.g., linear/branched/cyclic amylose, cellulose, chitosan, chitin, etc.) with improved physicochemical properties to address a range of fundamental and applied scientific problems.
This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will examine various topics related to the structure and functional properties of polysaccharide nanomaterials. The topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Synthesis, fabrication, and structural characterization of polysaccharide nanostructures
  • Characterization of the physicochemical properties of polysaccharide nanostructures
  • Kinetic and thermodynamic sorption-based phenomena of heterogeneous systems
  • Hydrogel and soft-matter nanostructured polysaccharide materials, molecular aggregates, etc.
  • Applications of polysaccharide-based adsorbent materials in catalysis, chemical separations, energy storage, environmental remediation, controlled-release, etc.
  • Future prospects and applications of polysaccharide sorbent materials

 

Dr. Lee D. Wilson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polysaccharides
  • nanosorbent materials
  • physicochemical properties
  • structure and functional properties
  • characterization
  • sorption phenomena

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Green Synthesis of Hierarchically Structured Silver-Polymer Nanocomposites with Antibacterial Activity
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(8), 137; doi:10.3390/nano6080137
Received: 11 April 2016 / Revised: 8 July 2016 / Accepted: 15 July 2016 / Published: 25 July 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (5121 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The in situ formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) aided by chondroitin sulfate and the preparation of a hierarchically structured silver-polymer nanocomposite with antimicrobial activity is shown. Green synthesis of AgNPs is carried out by thermal treatment (80 and 90 °C) or UV irradiation
[...] Read more.
The in situ formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) aided by chondroitin sulfate and the preparation of a hierarchically structured silver-polymer nanocomposite with antimicrobial activity is shown. Green synthesis of AgNPs is carried out by thermal treatment (80 and 90 °C) or UV irradiation of a chondroitin sulfate solution containing AgNO3 without using any further reducing agents or stabilizers. Best control of the AgNPs size and polydispersity was achieved by UV irradiation. The ice-segregation-induced self-assembly (ISISA) process, in which the polymer solution containing the AgNPs is frozen unidirectionally, and successively freeze-drying were employed to produce the chondroitin sulfate 3D scaffolds. The scaffolds were further crosslinked with hexamethylene diisocyanate vapors to avoid water solubility of the 3D structures in aqueous environments. The antimicrobial activity of the scaffolds was tested against Escherichia coli. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) found for AgNPs-CS (chondroitin sulfate) scaffolds was ca. 6 ppm. Full article
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Open AccessArticle A Label-Free Microelectrode Array Based on One-Step Synthesis of Chitosan–Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Thionine for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(7), 132; doi:10.3390/nano6070132
Received: 17 May 2016 / Revised: 1 July 2016 / Accepted: 6 July 2016 / Published: 11 July 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2975 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been an extensively used tumor marker responsible for clinical early diagnosis of cervical carcinomas, and pancreatic, colorectal, gastric and lung cancer. Combined with micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS) technology, it is important to develop a novel immune microelectrode array (MEA)
[...] Read more.
Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been an extensively used tumor marker responsible for clinical early diagnosis of cervical carcinomas, and pancreatic, colorectal, gastric and lung cancer. Combined with micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS) technology, it is important to develop a novel immune microelectrode array (MEA) not only for rapid analysis of serum samples, but also for cell detection in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we depict a simple approach to modify chitosan–multi-walled carbon nanotubes–thionine (CS–MWCNTs–THI) hybrid film through one-step electrochemical deposition and the CS-MWCNTs-THI hybrid films are successfully employed to immobilize anti-CEA for fabricating simple, label-free, and highly sensitive electro-chemical immune MEAs. The detection principle of immune MEA was based on the fact that the increasing formation of the antigen-antibody immunocomplex resulted in the decreased response currents and the relationship between the current reductions with the corresponding CEA concentrations was directly proportional. Experimental results indicated that the label-free MEA had good selectivity and the limit of detection for CEA is 0.5 pg/mL signal to noise ratio (SNR) = 3. A linear calibration plot for the detection of CEA was obtained in a wide concentration range from 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL (r = 0.996). This novel MEA has potential applications for detecting CEA for the research on cancer cells and cancer tissue slices as well as for effective early diagnosis. Full article
Open AccessArticle Nanostructures Derived from Starch and Chitosan for Fluorescence Bio-Imaging
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(7), 130; doi:10.3390/nano6070130
Received: 18 April 2016 / Revised: 25 June 2016 / Accepted: 30 June 2016 / Published: 5 July 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4319 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Fluorescent nanostructures (NSs) derived from polysaccharides have drawn great attention as novel fluorescent probes for potential bio-imaging applications. Herein, we reported a facile alkali-assisted hydrothermal method to fabricate polysaccharide NSs using starch and chitosan as raw materials. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that
[...] Read more.
Fluorescent nanostructures (NSs) derived from polysaccharides have drawn great attention as novel fluorescent probes for potential bio-imaging applications. Herein, we reported a facile alkali-assisted hydrothermal method to fabricate polysaccharide NSs using starch and chitosan as raw materials. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the average particle sizes are 14 nm and 75 nm for starch and chitosan NSs, respectively. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis showed that there are a large number of hydroxyl or amino groups on the surface of these polysaccharide-based NSs. Strong fluorescence with an excitation-dependent emission behaviour was observed under ultraviolet excitation. Interestingly, the photostability of the NSs was found to be superior to fluorescein and rhodamine B. The quantum yield of starch NSs could reach 11.12% under the excitation of 360 nm. The oxidative metal ions including Cu(II), Hg(II)and Fe(III) exhibited a quench effect on the fluorescence intensity of the prepared NSs. Both of the two kinds of the multicoloured NSs showed a maximum fluorescence intensity at pH 7, while the fluorescence intensity decreased dramatically when they were put in an either acidic or basic environment (at pH 3 or 11). The cytotoxicity study of starch NSs showed that low cell cytotoxicity and 80% viability was found after 24 h incubation, when their concentration was less than 10 mg/mL. The study also showed the possibility of using the multicoloured starch NSs for mouse melanoma cells and guppy fish imaging. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Quaternized Chitosan-Capped Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as Nanocarriers for Controlled Pesticide Release
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(7), 126; doi:10.3390/nano6070126
Received: 14 May 2016 / Revised: 16 June 2016 / Accepted: 22 June 2016 / Published: 28 June 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3752 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nanotechnology-based pesticide formulations would ensure effective utilization of agricultural inputs. In the present work, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with particle diameters of ~110 nm and pore sizes of ~3.7 nm were synthesized via a liquid crystal templating mechanism. A water-soluble chitosan (CS) derivative
[...] Read more.
Nanotechnology-based pesticide formulations would ensure effective utilization of agricultural inputs. In the present work, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with particle diameters of ~110 nm and pore sizes of ~3.7 nm were synthesized via a liquid crystal templating mechanism. A water-soluble chitosan (CS) derivative (N-(2-hydroxyl)propyl-3-trimethyl ammonium CS chloride, HTCC) was successfully capped on the surface of pyraclostrobin-loaded MSNs. The physicochemical and structural analyses showed that the electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding were the major forces responsible for the formation of HTCC-capped MSNs. HTCC coating greatly improved the loading efficiency (LC) (to 40.3%) compared to using bare MSNs as a single encapsulant (26.7%). The microstructure of the nanoparticles was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The pyraclostrobin-loaded nanoparticles showed an initial burst and subsequent sustained release behavior. HTCC-capped MSNs released faster than bare MSNs in the initial stage. Pyraclostrobin-loaded HTCC-capped MSNs with half doses of pyraclostrobin technical demonstrated almost the same fungicidal activity against Phomopsis asparagi (Sacc.), which obviously reduced the applied pesticide and enhanced the utilization efficiency. Therefore, HTCC-decorated MSNs demonstrated great potential as nanocarriers in agrochemical applications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Quaternized Carboxymethyl Chitosan-Based Silver Nanoparticles Hybrid: Microwave-Assisted Synthesis, Characterization and Antibacterial Activity
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(6), 118; doi:10.3390/nano6060118
Received: 3 May 2016 / Revised: 24 May 2016 / Accepted: 1 June 2016 / Published: 17 June 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5271 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A facile, efficient, and eco-friendly approach for the preparation of uniform silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) was developed. The synthesis was conducted in an aqueous medium exposed to microwave irradiation for 8 min, using laboratory-prepared, water-soluble quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan (QCMC) as a chemical reducer
[...] Read more.
A facile, efficient, and eco-friendly approach for the preparation of uniform silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) was developed. The synthesis was conducted in an aqueous medium exposed to microwave irradiation for 8 min, using laboratory-prepared, water-soluble quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan (QCMC) as a chemical reducer and stabilizer and silver nitrate as the silver source. The structure of the prepared QCMC was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The formation, size distribution, and dispersion of the Ag NPs in the QCMC matrix were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) analysis, and the thermal stability and antibacterial properties of the synthesized QCMC-based Ag NPs composite (QCMC-Ag) were also explored. The results revealed that (1) QCMC was successfully prepared by grafting quaternary ammonium groups onto carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) chains under microwave irradiation in water for 90 min and this substitution appeared to have occurred at -NH2 sites on C2 position of the pyranoid ring; (2) uniform and stable spherical Ag NPs could be synthesized when QCMC was used as the reducing and stabilizing agent; (3) Ag NPs were well dispersed in the QCMC matrix with a narrow size distribiution in the range of 17–31 nm without aggregation; and (4) due to the presence of Ag NPs, the thermal stability and antibacterial activity of QCMC-Ag were dramatically improved relative to QCMC. Full article
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