Special Issue "Nanomaterials with Functional Polymer Elements"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Nghia Truong Phuoc

ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: functional nanomaterials; nanoparticle shape; nanomedicines and polymer synthesis
Guest Editor
Dr. Mikey Whittaker

ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: functional soft matter; biomimetic materials; nanomedicines and manipulating the bio-nano interface
Guest Editor
Dr. John Quinn

ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: polymer synthesis; self-assembly and surface modification

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The application of advanced polymer synthesis techniques have enabled the preparation of a wide array of functional nanomaterials. These techniques have yielded a broad suite of polymeric nanomaterials that have found applications in a variety of industries and research fields. In addition, the combination of functional polymers (e.g., stimuli-responsive, anti-fouling, biocompatible, antimicrobial, etc.) with nanostructured materials (e.g., iron oxide nanoparticles, graphene, carbon nanotubes, etc.) leads to novel hybrid nanomaterials with desirable physicochemical properties. In this Special Issue of Nanomaterials, we will highlight cutting-edge research on the topic of “Nanomaterials with Functional Polymer Elements”. In particular, this Special Issue will feature new developments in the synthesis, characterization and application of all polymeric nanomaterials and polymer-functionalized nanoparticles provided functional polymers are the key elements. We look forward to receiving your contribution to this exciting Special Issue of Nanomaterials.

Dr. Nghia Truong Phuoc
Dr. Mikey Whittaker
Dr. John Quinn
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymeric nanomaterials

  • Polymeric nanoparticles

  • Hybrid nanomaterials

  • Synthesis, characterization, property and application

  • Nanotoxicology

  • Nano-bio interactions

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Preparation and Characterization of WS2@SiO2 and WS2@PANI Core-Shell Nanocomposites
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(3), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8030156
Received: 8 February 2018 / Revised: 7 March 2018 / Accepted: 8 March 2018 / Published: 10 March 2018
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Abstract
Two tungsten disulfide (WS2)-based core-shell nanocomposites were fabricated using readily available reagents and simple procedures. The surface was pre-treated with a surfactant couple in a layer-by-layer approach, enabling good dispersion of the WS2 nanostructures in aqueous media and providing a
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Two tungsten disulfide (WS2)-based core-shell nanocomposites were fabricated using readily available reagents and simple procedures. The surface was pre-treated with a surfactant couple in a layer-by-layer approach, enabling good dispersion of the WS2 nanostructures in aqueous media and providing a template for the polymerization of a silica (SiO2) shell. After a Stöber-like reaction, a conformal silica coating was achieved. Inspired by the resulting nanocomposite, a second one was prepared by reacting the surfactant-modified WS2 nanostructures with aniline and an oxidizing agent in an aqueous medium. Here too, a conformal coating of polyaniline (PANI) was obtained, giving a WS2@PANI nanocomposite. Both nanocomposites were analyzed by electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and FTIR, verifying the core-shell structure and the character of shells. The silica shell was amorphous and mesoporous and the surface area of the composite increases with shell thickness. Polyaniline shells slightly differ in their morphologies dependent on the acid used in the polymerization process and are amorphous like the silica shell. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the WS2@PANI nanocomposite showed variation between bulk PANI and the PANI shell. These two nanocomposites have great potential to expand the use of transition metals dichalcogenides (TMDCs) for new applications in different fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials with Functional Polymer Elements)
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Open AccessArticle Polymer-Based Nanocarriers for Co-Delivery and Combination of Diverse Therapies against Cancers
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(2), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8020085
Received: 18 December 2017 / Revised: 27 January 2018 / Accepted: 1 February 2018 / Published: 3 February 2018
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Abstract
Cancer gives rise to an enormous number of deaths worldwide nowadays. Therefore, it is in urgent need to develop new therapies, among which combined therapies including photothermal therapy (PTT) and chemotherapy (CHT) using polymer-based nanocarriers have attracted enormous interest due to the significantly
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Cancer gives rise to an enormous number of deaths worldwide nowadays. Therefore, it is in urgent need to develop new therapies, among which combined therapies including photothermal therapy (PTT) and chemotherapy (CHT) using polymer-based nanocarriers have attracted enormous interest due to the significantly enhanced efficacy and great progress has been made so far. The preparation of such nanocarriers is a comprehensive task involving the cooperation of nanomaterial science and biomedicine science. In this review, we try to introduce and analyze the structure, preparation and synergistic therapeutic effect of various polymer-based nanocarriers composed of anti-tumor drugs, nano-sized photothermal materials and other possible parts. Our effort may bring benefit to future exploration and potential applications of similar nanocarriers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials with Functional Polymer Elements)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Evaluation of Different Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Surface Coatings for Single-Particle Tracking Applications in Biological Environments
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(11), 393; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7110393
Received: 10 October 2017 / Revised: 7 November 2017 / Accepted: 13 November 2017 / Published: 16 November 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1692 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Fluorescence imaging of biological systems down to the single-molecule level has generated many advances in cellular biology. For applications within intact tissue, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are emerging as distinctive single-molecule nanoprobes, due to their near-infrared photoluminescence properties. For this, SWCNT surfaces must
[...] Read more.
Fluorescence imaging of biological systems down to the single-molecule level has generated many advances in cellular biology. For applications within intact tissue, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are emerging as distinctive single-molecule nanoprobes, due to their near-infrared photoluminescence properties. For this, SWCNT surfaces must be coated using adequate molecular moieties. Yet, the choice of the suspension agent is critical since it influences both the chemical and emission properties of the SWCNTs within their environment. Here, we compare the most commonly used surface coatings for encapsulating photoluminescent SWCNTs in the context of bio-imaging applications. To be applied as single-molecule nanoprobes, encapsulated nanotubes should display low cytotoxicity, and minimal unspecific interactions with cells while still being highly luminescent so as to be imaged and tracked down to the single nanotube level for long periods of time. We tested the cell proliferation and cellular viability of each surface coating and evaluated the impact of the biocompatible surface coatings on nanotube photoluminescence brightness. Our study establishes that phospholipid-polyethylene glycol-coated carbon nanotube is the best current choice for single nanotube tracking experiments in live biological samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials with Functional Polymer Elements)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Current Conjugation Methods for Immunosensors
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(5), 278; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8050278
Received: 3 April 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
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Abstract
Recent advances in the development of immunosensors using polymeric nanomaterials and nanoparticles have enabled a wide range of new functions and applications in diagnostic and prognostic research. One fundamental challenge that all immunosensors must overcome is to provide the specificity of target molecular
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Recent advances in the development of immunosensors using polymeric nanomaterials and nanoparticles have enabled a wide range of new functions and applications in diagnostic and prognostic research. One fundamental challenge that all immunosensors must overcome is to provide the specificity of target molecular recognition by immobilizing antibodies, antibody fragments, and/or other peptides or oligonucleotide molecules that are capable of antigen recognition on a compact device surface. This review presents progress in the application of immobilization strategies including the classical adsorption process, affinity attachment, random cross-linking and specific covalent linking. The choice of immobilization methods and its impact on biosensor performance in terms of capture molecule loading, orientation, stability and capture efficiency are also discussed in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials with Functional Polymer Elements)
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