Special Issue "Nanostructured Biosensors"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dimitrios P. Nikolelis

Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: analytical chemistry; chemical sensors; nanotechnology; biomembranes; lipid film based sensors; electrochemistry; nanomaterials; fluorometry differential scanning; food safety; calorimetry; scanning electron microscopy; IR and Raman spectroscopy; toxicants; toxins; pathogens; insecticides; pesticides; environmental monitoring and sciences; gas pollutants; atmospheric chemistry; doping materials; analysis of foods; analysis of fruits and vegetables; analysis of dairy products; water monitoring; artificial and natural receptors; biofuels; enzymes; antibodies; ion selective electrodes; kinetic method of analysis; flow injection analysis; optical methods of analysis; gastroenterology; chomatography; enzyme isolation; antibodies
Guest Editor
Dr. Georgia-Paraskevi Nikoleli

Laboratory of Inorganic & Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Sciences, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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Interests: analytical chemistry; nanotechnology; chemical sensors; food analysis and safety; environmental monitoring; bioanalysis; biochemical processes; biomembranes; artificial and natural receptors; lipid film based sensors; insecticides; pesticides doping materials toxins; toxicants; pathogens; antibodies; enzymes; analysis of fruits and vegetables; analysis of dairy products; gas pollutants; atmospheric chemistry; differential scanning calorimetry; electroanalysis; IR and Raman spectroscopy; new materials; scanning electron microscopy; electron scanning microscopy; tem; technological sciences; physical sciences

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues:

Nanotechnology has provided tools, methods, and materials that can be readily exploited for biosensor construction. Lab-on-chips, for example, may have become a reality for commercial systems; hand-held devices could be massively produced for field measurements; noninvasive monitoring for disease management might be successful in the near future. We invite authors to contribute original research articles or comprehensive review articles covering the current state-of-the-art and the future trends in the design of nanostructured biosensors for applications in environmental monitoring, food quality, clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, and disease monitoring. This special issue aims to cover a broad range of subjects, from device design and assembly to analytical development, implementation and commercialization prospects. The format of welcomed articles includes full papers, communications, and reviews.

Prof. Dr. Dimitros P. Nikolelis
Dr. Georgia-Paraskevi Nikoleli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • system integration
  • real-time monitoring
  • sensor assembly
  • multiplex analysis
  • lab-on-chips
  • non-invasive detection

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanoparticles Derived from Silkworm Excrement as On–Off–On Fluorescent Sensors to Detect Fe(III) and Biothiols
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(6), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8060443
Received: 28 May 2018 / Revised: 14 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 17 June 2018
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Abstract
On–off–on fluorescent sensors based on emerging carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) or carbon dots (CDs) have attracted extensive attention for their convenience and efficiency. In this study, dumped silkworm excrement was used as a novel precursor to prepare fluorescent nitrogen-doped CNPs (N-CNPs) through hydrothermal treatment.
[...] Read more.
On–off–on fluorescent sensors based on emerging carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) or carbon dots (CDs) have attracted extensive attention for their convenience and efficiency. In this study, dumped silkworm excrement was used as a novel precursor to prepare fluorescent nitrogen-doped CNPs (N-CNPs) through hydrothermal treatment. The obtained N-CNPs showed good photoluminescent properties and excellent water dispersibility. Thus, they were applied as fluorescence “on–off–on” probes for the detection of Fe(III) and biothiols. The “on–off” process was achieved by adding Fe(III) into N-CNP solution, which resulted in the selective fluorescence quenching, with the detection limit of 0.20 μM in the linear range of 1–500 μM. Following this, the introduction of biothiols could recover the fluorescence efficiently, in order to realize the “off–on” process. By using glutathione (GSH) as the representative, the linear range was in the range of 1–1000 μM, and the limit of detection was 0.13 μM. Moreover, this useful strategy was successfully applied for the determination of amounts of GSH in fetal calf serum samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle Applications of Nanomaterials Based on Magnetite and Mesoporous Silica on the Selective Detection of Zinc Ion in Live Cell Imaging
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(6), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8060434
Received: 7 May 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 14 June 2018
PDF Full-text (6345 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (FMNPs) and functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) were synthesized by the conjugation of magnetite and mesoporous silica with the small and fluorogenic benzothiazole ligand, that is, 2(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (hpbtz). The synthesized fluorescent nanoparticles were characterized by FTIR, XRD, XRF,
[...] Read more.
Functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (FMNPs) and functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) were synthesized by the conjugation of magnetite and mesoporous silica with the small and fluorogenic benzothiazole ligand, that is, 2(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (hpbtz). The synthesized fluorescent nanoparticles were characterized by FTIR, XRD, XRF, 13C CP MAS NMR, BET, and TEM. The photophysical behavior of FMNPs and FMSNs in ethanol was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy. The modification of magnetite and silica scaffolds with the highly fluorescent benzothiazole ligand enabled the nanoparticles to be used as selective and sensitive optical probes for zinc ion detection. Moreover, the presence of hpbtz in FMNPs and FMSNs induced efficient cell viability and zinc ion uptake, with desirable signaling in the normal human kidney epithelial (Hek293) cell line. The significant viability of FMNPs and FMSNs (80% and 92%, respectively) indicates a potential applicability of these nanoparticles as in vitro imaging agents. The calculated limit of detections (LODs) were found to be 2.53 × 10−6 and 2.55 × 10−6 M for Fe3O4-H@hpbtz and MSN-Et3N-IPTMS-hpbtz-f1, respectively. FMSNs showed more pronounced zinc signaling relative to FMNPs, as a result of the more efficient penetration into the cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Biosensors)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Diazotization-Coupling Reaction-Based Determination of Tyrosine in Urine Using Ag Nanocubes by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(6), 400; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8060400
Received: 5 May 2018 / Revised: 29 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 3 June 2018
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Abstract
A novel, simple, and highly sensitive method was developed to detect the concentration of tyrosine-derived azo dye indirectly using silver nanocubes (AgNCs) as a substrate on a super-hydrophobic silver film by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Diazotization-coupling reaction occurred between diazonium ions and the
[...] Read more.
A novel, simple, and highly sensitive method was developed to detect the concentration of tyrosine-derived azo dye indirectly using silver nanocubes (AgNCs) as a substrate on a super-hydrophobic silver film by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Diazotization-coupling reaction occurred between diazonium ions and the phenolic tyrosine, resulting in three new typical peaks in the SERS spectrum of the azo dye that was formed on the AgNCs, indicating strong SERS activity. Subsequently, the limit of detection of this approach was as low as 10−12 M for tyrosine. Moreover, the SERS intensities of the three typical SERS signals of the analyte were linearly correlated with the logarithm of concentration of the Tyrosine. The proposed method shows great potential for tyrosine detection in the urine samples of normal humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Biosensors)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Carbon Nanodots in Electrochemical Affinity Biosensing
Author: Paloma Yánez-Sedeño, Susana Campuzano and José M. Pingarrón
Abstract: Carbon nanodots (CNDs) are new and interesting members of carbon nanomaterials family which have attracted great attention due to their unique electrical, magnetic, and optical properties and demonstrated to contribute significantly in the development of electrochemical affinity biosensors with improved performance. Considering the great progress and interesting features arisen in the last years, this review addresses, through discussion of recent selected examples, the potential of these promising carbon nanostructures using either as signal tags or as electrode surface modifiers in electrochemical affinity biosensing strategies. The particular role of these nanomaterials in the highlighted approaches, their preparation, and the electrochemical platform designs, as well as the unique advantages they provide in the electrochemical biosensing of relevant analytes are critically discussed. Unmet challenges, research opportunities and future development trends in this rapidly evolving field are also outlined.

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