Special Issue "Colloidal Quantum Dots (QDs) for Display, Solar Cells and Bio-Image Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hao-chung Kuo

Department of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
E-Mail
Phone: +886-3-5712121 ext 31986
Fax: +886-3-5716631
Interests: quantum dots; LED; nanotechnology
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chien-chung Lin

Institute of Photonics system, National Chiao-Tung University, Tainan, Taiwan
E-Mail
Phone: +886-6-3032121 ext 57754
Fax: +886-6-303-2535
Interests: hybrid quantum dot enhanced solar cells; hybrid quantum dot enhanced LEDs; novel semiconductor based solar cells fabrication and simulation
Guest Editor
Assist. Prof. Dr. Kai Wang

Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
E-Mail
Phone: +86-755-88018181
Fax: +86-755-88010000
Interests: luminescent nanocrystals (e.g. quantum dots/rods) and related optoelectronic devices for displays; lighting and solar energy (e.g. QLED, QR display, QD-LSC)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) have been widely studied in the past few decades. Researchers and scientists have made great efforts to research and develop QDs for next generation displays (include micro-display), with ultra-wide color gamut and high performance QD photovoltaics. However, there are still existing difficulties and problem which need to be overcome and solved, such as scalable synthetic process, better carrier transport, stability and reliability, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for QDs and nanostructures.

We invite authors to contribute original research articles and review articles covering current progress on the preparation and the usage of QDs for displays and solar cells Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Cadmium Free Quantum Dots
  • Quantum Dots for Live Cells, in Vivo Imaging, and Diagnostics
  • Quantum dots to drive flexible displays
  • Quantum dots stability and reliability
  • Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for QDs and nanostructures
  • Quantum dot light emitting diodes
  • Quantum dot solar cells
  • Quantum dot luminescent solar concentrator

Prof. Dr. Hao-chung Kuo
Prof. Dr. Chien-chung Lin
Dr. Kai Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Semiconductor nanocrystals
  • colloidal quantum dots
  • solar cell
  • assembly
  • micro display
  • optoelectronic devices

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication Improving the Power Conversion Efficiency of Carbon Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells by Growing the Dots on a TiO2 Photoanode In Situ
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(6), 130; doi:10.3390/nano7060130
Received: 1 April 2017 / Revised: 19 May 2017 / Accepted: 24 May 2017 / Published: 31 May 2017
PDF Full-text (5293 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are highly promising since they can potentially solve global energy issues. The development of new photosensitizers is the key to fully realizing perspectives proposed to DSSCs. Being cheap and nontoxic, carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have emerged as attractive candidates
[...] Read more.
Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are highly promising since they can potentially solve global energy issues. The development of new photosensitizers is the key to fully realizing perspectives proposed to DSSCs. Being cheap and nontoxic, carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have emerged as attractive candidates for this purpose. However, current methodologies to build up CQD-sensitized solar cells (CQDSCs) result in an imperfect apparatus with extremely low power conversion efficiencies (PCEs). Herein, we present a simple strategy of growing carbon quantum dots (CQDs) onto TiO2 surfaces in situ. The CQDs/TiO2 hybridized photoanode was then used to construct solar cell with an improved PCE of 0.87%, which is higher than all of the reported CQDSCs adopting the simple post-adsorption method. This result indicates that an in situ growing strategy has great advantages in terms of optimizing the performance of CQDSCs. In addition, we have also found that the mechanisms dominating the performance of CQDSCs are different from those behind the solar cells using inorganic semiconductor quantum dots (ISQDs) as the photosensitizers, which re-confirms the conclusion that the characteristics of CQDs differ from those of ISQDs. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication CdTe Nanocrystal Hetero-Junction Solar Cells with High Open Circuit Voltage Based on Sb-doped TiO2 Electron Acceptor Materials
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(5), 101; doi:10.3390/nano7050101
Received: 13 April 2017 / Revised: 27 April 2017 / Accepted: 28 April 2017 / Published: 3 May 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3700 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We propose Sb-doped TiO2 as electron acceptor material for depleted CdTe nanocrystal (NC) hetero-junction solar cells. Novel devices with the architecture of FTO/ZnO/Sb:TiO2/CdTe/Au based on CdTe NC and TiO2 precursor are fabricated by rational ambient solution process. By introducing
[...] Read more.
We propose Sb-doped TiO2 as electron acceptor material for depleted CdTe nanocrystal (NC) hetero-junction solar cells. Novel devices with the architecture of FTO/ZnO/Sb:TiO2/CdTe/Au based on CdTe NC and TiO2 precursor are fabricated by rational ambient solution process. By introducing TiO2 with dopant concentration, we are able to tailor the optoelectronic properties of NC solar cells. Our novel devices demonstrate a very high open circuit voltage of 0.74 V, which is the highest Voc reported for any CdTe NC based solar cells. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of solar cells increases with the increase of Sb-doped content from 1% to 3%, then decreases almost linearly with further increase of Sb content due to the recombination effect. The champion device shows Jsc, Voc, FF, and PCE of 14.65 mA/cm2, 0.70 V, 34.44, and 3.53% respectively, which is prospective for solution processed NC solar cells with high Voc. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(4), 78; doi:10.3390/nano7040078
Received: 2 December 2016 / Revised: 24 February 2017 / Accepted: 23 March 2017 / Published: 6 April 2017
PDF Full-text (2825 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new ”paradigm shift” non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles
[...] Read more.
Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new ”paradigm shift” non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) as used by the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase. Full article
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Open AccessArticle An Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Composed of Carbon-Coated Nano Tin Sulfide
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(2), 39; doi:10.3390/nano7020039
Received: 5 January 2017 / Revised: 9 February 2017 / Accepted: 11 February 2017 / Published: 15 February 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5126 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, a biosensor, based on a glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized, carbon-coated tin sulfide (SnS) assembled on a glass carbon electrode (GCE) was developed, and its direct electrochemistry was investigated. The carbon coated SnS (C-SnS) nanoparticle was prepared through a
[...] Read more.
In this study, a biosensor, based on a glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized, carbon-coated tin sulfide (SnS) assembled on a glass carbon electrode (GCE) was developed, and its direct electrochemistry was investigated. The carbon coated SnS (C-SnS) nanoparticle was prepared through a simple two-step process, using hydrothermal and chemical vapor deposition methods. The large reactive surface area and unique electrical potential of C-SnS could offer a favorable microenvironment for facilitating electron transfer between enzymes and the electrode surface. The structure and sensor ability of the proposed GOx/C-SnS electrode were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and cyclic voltammetry study (CV). Full article
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Open AccessArticle Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Composed of Carbon-Coated Nano-Zinc Oxide
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(2), 36; doi:10.3390/nano7020036
Received: 5 January 2017 / Revised: 31 January 2017 / Accepted: 7 February 2017 / Published: 10 February 2017
PDF Full-text (4707 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nowadays glucose detection is of great importance in the fields of biological, environmental, and clinical analyzes. In this research, we report a zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod powder surface-coated with carbon material for non-enzymatic glucose sensor applications through a hydrothermal process and chemical vapor
[...] Read more.
Nowadays glucose detection is of great importance in the fields of biological, environmental, and clinical analyzes. In this research, we report a zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod powder surface-coated with carbon material for non-enzymatic glucose sensor applications through a hydrothermal process and chemical vapor deposition method. A series of tests, including crystallinity analysis, microstructure observation, and electrochemical property investigations were carried out. For the cyclic voltammetric (CV) glucose detection, the low detection limit of 1 mM with a linear range from 0.1 mM to 10 mM was attained. The sensitivity was 2.97 μA/cm2mM, which is the most optimized ever reported. With such good analytical performance from a simple process, it is believed that the nanocomposites composed of ZnO nanorod powder surface-coated with carbon material are promising for the development of cost-effective non-enzymatic electrochemical glucose biosensors with high sensitivity. Full article
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Open AccessArticle A Study of Inverted-Type Perovskite Solar Cells with Various Composition Ratios of (FAPbI3)1−x(MAPbBr3)x
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(10), 183; doi:10.3390/nano6100183
Received: 5 September 2016 / Revised: 24 September 2016 / Accepted: 10 October 2016 / Published: 13 October 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2156 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work presents mixed (FAPbI3)1−x(MAPbBr3)x perovskite films with various composition ratios, x (x = 0–1), which are formed using the spin coating method. The structural, optical, and electronic behaviors of the mixed (FAPbI3
[...] Read more.
This work presents mixed (FAPbI3)1−x(MAPbBr3)x perovskite films with various composition ratios, x (x = 0–1), which are formed using the spin coating method. The structural, optical, and electronic behaviors of the mixed (FAPbI3)1−x(MAPbBr3)x perovskite films are discussed. A device with structure glass/indium tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/mixed perovskite/C60/BCP/Ag was fabricated. The mixed perovskite film was an active light-harvesting layer. PEDOT:PSS was a hole transporting layer between the ITO and perovskite. Both C60 and bathocuproine (BCP) were electron transporting layers. MAPbBr3 was added to FAPbI3 with a composition ratio of x = 0.2, stabilizing the perovskite phase, which exhibited a uniform and dense morphology. The optimal device exhibited band matching with C60, resulting in a low series resistance (Rsh) and a high fill factor (FF). Therefore, the device with composition (FAPbI3)1−x(MAPbBr3)x and x = 0.2 exhibited outstanding performance. Full article
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